Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Trek 1000 vs Giant OCR1 vs others...

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Trek 1000 vs Giant OCR1 vs others...

Old 07-07-02, 03:11 PM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Trek 1000 vs Giant OCR1 vs others...

Hi all, I'm getting my research down or a roadbike I hope to get in a couple of months time, but I've got a couple of questions that google is being to random with, so hopefully you can help

First off, the (hopefully) easy one:

My budget will probably be around £750 absoloute max. Also: I'll prolly have to buy new, since I dont know off any huge stockists of S/H bikes & Ebays not to great in Scotland. Anyway:

Trek1000 (£650)


vs Giant OCR1(£700)


In particular, I'm curious about the frames. The trek features the mysterious "Alpha Aluminum", whereas the Giant is in 6061 Aluminum, which (according to my hastily-assembled net-wisdom) is superior to 7005 (why?).

Aditionally, there are a few bikes I've noticed like this one, with 7005 frames, but carbon forks. Should this sway me in any way? Bearing in mind I'm a super-tight-fisted Scotsman & want my meager wages (oh, I'm so underpaid ) to go as far as possible.

I can always replace the forks, but ditching a frame would be a real pain in the future. Any words of wisdom out there?

Oh, one more thing: does anyone know of any UK based reputable S/H bikes, or a good classifieds mag? I've seen a Look that I'm in no position to buy, but it'd be great if I could squeeze yet more value out of my wallet
ONEN is offline  
Old 07-07-02, 03:12 PM
  #2  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Oh, and this is my first post: Go ME!
ONEN is offline  
Old 07-07-02, 04:19 PM
  #3  
Almost Immortal
 
The Rob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 820

Bikes: 2004 Trek 7500FX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yeah, Go You! I have no wisdom for you (not knowing road bikes), but welcome to the forums!

-Rob
__________________
"Ignorance begets confidence more frequently than does knowledge." -Charles Darwin


https://blog.myspace.com/robcatg

https://therob.wordpress.com
The Rob is offline  
Old 07-07-02, 04:52 PM
  #4  
A Heart Needs a Home
 
Rich Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Posts: 1,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The most important thing, by far, is fit. Frame material in this price range is a red herring (except that you might want to try some steel frames to see if you can feel a difference).

Giant makes fewer frame sizes and expects to achieve fit by offering lots of choices in seatpost and stem sizes, including that ugly adjustable stem thing. That can work well for some people (sloping top tubes are sometimes helpful for the shortlegged/long-torsoed set) and others will simply fall between sizes and will never be comfortable on a Giant.

Getting obsessed with details like this aluminum vs that aluminum or double-butted vs stratght gauge spokes and all this other arcana obscures what matters most: if the bike doesn't fit, it will caus discomfort or even pain. If it's painful to ride, you won't ride it. If you don't ride it, it's no bargain.

Proper fit is so important in road bikes that the bit extra you might pay at a good bike shop that understands how to accomplish it is actually a bargain. I would never recommend a neophyte buy a road bike sight-unseen. Later on, when you know your ideal frame geometry perfectly, you might be able to tell from a table of specifications whether a bike will fit and a little bit about how it might feel to ride it. But not yet.

I don't know enough about what's available in the UK to be able to recommend a specific make or model, but I think the above principles apply anywhere. In your price range, just about any decent road bike will make you happy if it fits well. And agonizing over details will be a waste of time and money if it doesn't.

Luck,
RichC
Rich Clark is offline  
Old 07-07-02, 05:09 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 80
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hi Onen,

I was buying my first road bike last year and looked at the exactly the same bikes. I was just about to suggest the Dawes when I got to the mention of it on your post.

I don't know the difference between the types of alloy other than that 7005 has zinc in it and 6061 magnesium and silicon but the main thing is to have a go on all of them and see which geometry suits you best. My opinions after doing so were different from my expectations. Here's what other info I can offer:

The Trek has only a Sora group set with shifters that are annoying for some (myself included) as the up shift uses a thumb lever. The 1200 (£750) has a mainly Tiagra group though with Taiwanese brakes (and an alloy fork I think).

The Giant is great and I enjoyed riding it. Only thing is that it comes in three sizes and your body size could quite easily fall between these, as mine did. It has a triple chain ring - see other threads for endless debate. It also has a quilled headset which is a tad more fiddly than the AHead on the Dawes and Trek 1200.

The carbon fork on the Dawes (which I eventually bought) seems to soak up quite a bit of road vibration, it also has a full Tiagra goup set. I have been very happy with mine. Getting hold of one may be a problem due to supply problems. Also Dawes don't make bikes for anyone in the peleton so some may view it with scorn.

I've also come to the conclusion (and I reckon this applies to all of them, not just the Dawes) that at this level when the time comes to upgrade you'd be better of saving for a whole new bike and keeping the old one as a commuter or trainer. I say this as I recently considered buying some bits and found that a 105 group set and Mavic open Pros (let alone higher spec stuff) will cost £500 - 600, well over half the initial cost again and come the next upgrade I might as well have bought a better bike ready-fit with the better bits.

Both my parents are Scottish but I say spend the money now as it will be more expensive later - go in intending to spend less and get the bike shop to throw in some decent pedals when you go for the more expensive bike, it worked for me (although it wasn't pre-calculated).

PS sorry about extensive yet uniformative post, have tendency to ramble
Niall is offline  
Old 07-07-02, 05:12 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 80
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ah, just doubled much of Rich Clark's info - sorry but yes fit is the most important thing.
Niall is offline  
Old 07-08-02, 12:56 AM
  #7  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 20
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks, all. I suppose worrying about materials is pretty meaningless at such a price point. Might be worth buying a lesser bike now & putting the remnants of my savings into an Ultimate Bike Fund for when I'm super-fit... which should leave plenty of time for saving
ONEN is offline  
Old 07-10-02, 07:28 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
You are wasting your time worrying about the difference between 6061 and 7005. Worry about fit. Many buy steel forked bikes and then spend more money upgrading to CF. save money and buy right the first time.The OCR-1 has totally better parts spec than the Trek 1000 and is also 9 speed,making furure upgrades easier and probably less expensive.
pokey is offline  
Old 07-10-02, 12:01 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Home of the Pistons
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I also am looking at the Giant OCR-1. So far it feels the best on the test rides I've taken. I have found a LBS that has it on sale for $800 with a lifetime service contract, and 15% off any accessories I buy at the time of purchase. Think I will probably get it this week-end. Good luck on your decision.
gun-n-gal is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.