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Weighed my bike for the first time

Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Weighed my bike for the first time

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Old 02-12-18, 11:46 AM
  #151  
zymphad
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Originally Posted by Bomb Komodo View Post
Any idea where to find those? I want to make sure I have the right measurements. The Giant fork is an "Advanced-grade composite, Hybrid OverDrive steerer". Tough to find much info on it.

That's one thing that has held me back - finding the right fork and making sure it is a fit.
Giant lists 1 1/8 - 1 1/4 tapering. And you'll need to find a disc fork. ENVE makes one, $575.

I probably would just ride with your current fork, sounds like the only the steerer is alloy, which Giant did to avoid steerer tube breaking, which seem to me usually usually caused by overtorquing the stem and improper torque on the compression plug, not the fork itself.
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Old 02-12-18, 12:22 PM
  #152  
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Originally Posted by zymphad View Post
Giant lists 1 1/8 - 1 1/4 tapering. And you'll need to find a disc fork. ENVE makes one, $575.

I probably would just ride with your current fork, sounds like the only the steerer is alloy, which Giant did to avoid steerer tube breaking, which seem to me usually usually caused by overtorquing the stem and improper torque on the compression plug, not the fork itself.
Yeah, major hassle and I doubt it saves THAT much weight. I could probably buy a carbon stem and carbon aero bars and see more of a benefit anyway.
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Old 02-12-18, 12:46 PM
  #153  
Dean V
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Originally Posted by Bomb Komodo View Post
Yeah, major hassle and I doubt it saves THAT much weight. I could probably buy a carbon stem and carbon aero bars and see more of a benefit anyway.
I wouldn't bother with changing the fork.
Are you sure the wheels are carbon? The lower models like that usually have quite heavy aluminium wheels. They are black and sort of look like they might be carbon at a glance, but they are not.
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Old 02-12-18, 01:02 PM
  #154  
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
It's a stretch to call that an "old steel bike". The frame is old, that's all.
I thought stretching was important for cyclists.

It is interesting though, how light some bike goods were back in the day. Many of our ďlighteningsĒ were actually offset by complexity of the more modern parts. Disc brakes come to mind. How light would a bike be today if it had a modern carbon frame and fork with carbon fiber downtube shifters instead of brifters, 5-speed cassette instead of 11, etc.
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Old 02-12-18, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
How light would a bike be today if it had a modern carbon frame and fork with carbon fiber downtube shifters instead of brifters, 5-speed cassette instead of 11, etc.
I am not all that interested in knowing how light a bike which didn't work as well might be.

You want retro-authenticity, build an all- CF singlespeed. Or one of those wooden walking-bikes in CF. Just a frame, no brakes or drive train.

You want light, build a CF unicycle.

How light could a modern plastic reproduction of a classic '70s racer be? As light as you could afford to make it. What's the point?

(Sorry--We checked our records and your Random Curiosity permit is not up to date. Please cease and desist Immediately. ---Department of Ridiculous Contrary Imagination.)
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Old 02-12-18, 01:30 PM
  #156  
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Originally Posted by rpenmanparker View Post
I thought stretching was important for cyclists.
That's a myth.
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Old 02-12-18, 01:41 PM
  #157  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
I am not all that interested in knowing how light a bike which didn't work as well might be.
Neither am I really. Last summer I built up a 1983 Guerciotti SLX with 1991 Chorus, and it has yet to be weighed. It's beautiful, and very functional, but I couldn't care less about it's weight.

Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
You want retro-authenticity, build an all- CF singlespeed.
I did something like that with an old 62cm CF frame, but used lightweight aluminum parts from my spare parts bin. It's just over 13lbs. with pedals and cages. Not a featherweight, but pretty light for a bunch of parts I already had.
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Old 02-12-18, 02:12 PM
  #158  
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
Neither am I really. Last summer I built up a 1983 Guerciotti SLX with 1991 Chorus, and it has yet to be weighed. It's beautiful, and very functional, but I couldn't care less about it's weight.
I believe it is a felony crime to make the claim without posting the pics.

Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
I did something like that with an old 62cm CF frame, but used lightweight aluminum parts from my spare parts bin. It's just over 13lbs. with pedals and cages. Not a featherweight, but pretty light for a bunch of parts I already had.
that's pretty amazing. i guess though ... a cassette is a big chunk of metal and no brifters have to weigh less than brifters .....

but yeah, 13 lbs isn't light ... in what world?
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Old 02-12-18, 02:20 PM
  #159  
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The Panasonic Ultralight came out in the 70s. It was steel. It was roughly 10lbs.

It was also a track bike.

Now it is a road bike :
Still cheating - no pedals.
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Old 02-12-18, 05:29 PM
  #160  
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I haven't weighed them on a scale, but from lifting them, I'd say my fixed gear bike is heavier than all but the TCX, which actually has a c.f. frame. It also has mega tires, mega cogs, and disc brakes. FG is just super stiff aluminum with boat anchors for pedals, rims and crankset.
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Old 02-12-18, 06:08 PM
  #161  
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
Last summer I built up a 1983 Guerciotti SLX with 1991 Chorus, and it has yet to be weighed. It's beautiful, and very functional, but I couldn't care less about it's weight.
Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
I believe it is a felony crime to make the claim without posting the pics.


The real crime is that I rarely ride it.

Last edited by noodle soup; 02-12-18 at 06:13 PM.
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Old 02-12-18, 08:50 PM
  #162  
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Originally Posted by jamesdak View Post
Would you trust it to bomb down out of the mountains at 50+ mph?
Tbh Iím more of a climber, Iíve hit around 45 mph on downhills with ease. The biggest limiting factor is the lack of disc brakes. I feel lot more comfortable bombing down hills at 50 mph if I had disc brakes.
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Old 02-13-18, 07:04 AM
  #163  
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
The real crime is that I rarely ride it.
I am glad you are a criminal. Really clean and classic.
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Old 02-13-18, 07:23 AM
  #164  
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Originally Posted by Karman321 View Post
Tbh Iím more of a climber, Iíve hit around 45 mph on downhills with ease. The biggest limiting factor is the lack of disc brakes. I feel lot more comfortable bombing down hills at 50 mph if I had disc brakes.
Don't let the brakes bother you. I do that all the time on my vintage steel rides with rim brakes.
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Old 02-13-18, 08:39 AM
  #165  
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Originally Posted by Karman321 View Post
Tbh Iím more of a climber, Iíve hit around 45 mph on downhills with ease. The biggest limiting factor is the lack of disc brakes. I feel lot more comfortable bombing down hills at 50 mph if I had disc brakes.
I've seen this line of thought before. are you concerned about rim heat or stopping power? The pro's have been going over 60 on rim brakes for decades. I frequently got over 50 on descents myself, my best is 58.

At those speeds, it really isn't about stopping power. If you stop too quickly, you'll skid and crash.

Other than enabling wide tires, the only advantage I see is that of heating up rims in a pack. When I raced at the Cat 3 and 4 levels, most riders had aluminum clinchers. In large packs the smell of burning brakes was everpresent, and on descents people would occasionally blow out, I think due to heating up rims. I never saw this at the higher levels, so it's probably a clincher vs tubular issue. So yeah, I could see discs completely eliminating this problem.

That said, it only comes up on very long descents in large groups.
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Old 02-13-18, 08:53 AM
  #166  
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Originally Posted by Doge View Post
Power Cords,
How do you like their performance?
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Old 02-13-18, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
How do you like their performance?
Best "performance". They are super smooth, almost like hydraulics. Stretch is not a factor. They are also about 50% the weight, I'd use them on the race bike period. They are not ideal for a straight pull set screw clamp like may be found in a Campy Delta (1990s) or TriRig (current) brake due to cutting. In a traditional side-pull Shimano/Campy/SRAM - they would likely be an improvement. Do the system with the little alloy links.

They are a huge pain to install and high skill/patience to install. The cordz must be 100% in the nylon sleeve so they do not get nicked. They are subject to cuts and breaking were they contact metal. For this reason I made the very short front brake cable braided steel again on the hill bike. They also kink in packaging/installation. They are some-plastic coated fibres. The plastic will kink. In general, like steel cables, they do not like to be clamped and re-clamped.
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Old 02-13-18, 09:43 AM
  #168  
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Originally Posted by Maelochs View Post
I am glad you are a criminal. Really clean and classic.
Thanks. The frameset was NOS, and absolutely flawless.
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Old 02-13-18, 10:16 AM
  #169  
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Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
I wouldn't bother with changing the fork.
Are you sure the wheels are carbon? The lower models like that usually have quite heavy aluminium wheels. They are black and sort of look like they might be carbon at a glance, but they are not.
Yes they are because I bought them separate from the bike

The stock wheels were heavy and slow. They do no justice to the frame. I saved 1.5 pounds switching to Carbon wheels and they are 50mm, which really has helped my overall speeds. People I ride with are now saying that they can't believe how much stronger I am riding, so it's not just in my head. Of course, I also see it in the numbers too.
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Old 02-13-18, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Karman321 View Post
Tbh Iím more of a climber, Iíve hit around 45 mph on downhills with ease. The biggest limiting factor is the lack of disc brakes. I feel lot more comfortable bombing down hills at 50 mph if I had disc brakes.
I would be far more worried about the pound of material I sanded off my bike than having disc brakes. But thatís just me.
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Old 02-13-18, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post


The real crime is that I rarely ride it.



It may be an infraction to lean the tire up against cactus spines like that....
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Old 02-13-18, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
It may be an infraction to lean the tire up against cactus spines like that....
It only looks like it's touching. There's actually a small stone between the tire and the saguaro.
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Old 02-13-18, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
I've seen this line of thought before. are you concerned about rim heat or stopping power? The pro's have been going over 60 on rim brakes for decades. I frequently got over 50 on descents myself, my best is 58.

At those speeds, it really isn't about stopping power. If you stop too quickly, you'll skid and crash.

Other than enabling wide tires, the only advantage I see is that of heating up rims in a pack. When I raced at the Cat 3 and 4 levels, most riders had aluminum clinchers. In large packs the smell of burning brakes was everpresent, and on descents people would occasionally blow out, I think due to heating up rims. I never saw this at the higher levels, so it's probably a clincher vs tubular issue. So yeah, I could see discs completely eliminating this problem.

That said, it only comes up on very long descents in large groups.
i have carbon wheel set, with the pads provided i could never try this however i have recently installed 'lifeline' pads they are blue in color and 5 dollars from wiggle.com the package comes with 4 pads. these seem to stop a lot better. will have to try in a couple weeks when it gets warmer out depending and braking to see what the performance is like!
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Old 02-13-18, 05:44 PM
  #174  
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Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
I've seen this line of thought before. are you concerned about rim heat or stopping power? The pro's have been going over 60 on rim brakes for decades. I frequently got over 50 on descents myself, my best is 58.
...
At 400lbs, 3,000W peak and a 57X11 we hit well above 60mph. I was worried about heat. I used mostly tubulars (not here) and later 3M FastTack for glue tubular that would take the heat. I re glued the pads with Epoxylite 6203. I could stand that bike on its front wheel. Which I did racing the Duet in Eugene, OR with my wife (so 350lb, less power) and we bent the front fork.
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Old 02-13-18, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
I've seen this line of thought before. are you concerned about rim heat or stopping power? The pro's have been going over 60 on rim brakes for decades. I frequently got over 50 on descents myself, my best is 58.

At those speeds, it really isn't about stopping power. If you stop too quickly, you'll skid and crash.

Other than enabling wide tires, the only advantage I see is that of heating up rims in a pack. When I raced at the Cat 3 and 4 levels, most riders had aluminum clinchers. In large packs the smell of burning brakes was everpresent, and on descents people would occasionally blow out, I think due to heating up rims. I never saw this at the higher levels, so it's probably a clincher vs tubular issue. So yeah, I could see discs completely eliminating this problem.

That said, it only comes up on very long descents in large groups.
LOL, Tour De Park City.... 2 years in a row I overcooked a horseshoe curve on a fast descent and smoked the brakes, literally. You'd have thought I'd have remembered the second year.
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