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pesape 02-15-18 04:50 PM

2018 Specialized Diverge
 
I'm thinking of getting a new bike and am leaning towards the Diverge but wanted to get some opinions on specific models.

I currently have a Specialized Secteur Elite that I bought new roughly 5-6 years ago. The bike shop recommended that one for someone just getting into a road bike and for someone with my preference for ride location. We have miles and miles of wide paved walking/biking trails in KC that take you through woods, by creeks, etc. that I greatly prefer over true riding on the road. That bike was ~$1400-$1500.

That information is key as it relates to why I'm leaning towards the Diverge and why I'm trying to decide on which model. I never road in the winter due to cold weather, and with a little kids at home, it was also hard to be gone for a few hours riding as much as I'd like. Because of that, about a year and half ago, I bought a trainer and hooked up my bike to that. I now use it everyday on the trainer for cardio during normal workouts. Given that I use the trainer so much, I don't want to mess with taking it off, buying a new rim and tire to switch out the training tire, riding, and then doing putting it all back together. Leading to me wanting a new bike...

I found out that the Diverge is basically the Secteur (or replaced it a few years back). I was checking out bikes last year but in looking at the Diverge and Roubaix, I learned that the 2018 Diverge would basically be a 'new' model. I also wasn't sure the Roubaix would really be the right bike for what I wanted. While I wouldn't mind the option of a possible group ride, again my main purpose will be paved bike paths though those could be slightly muddy or have some lose dirt or gravel in spots.

Fast forward to now... the 2018 Diverge looks like the best bike to suit my needs, and it seems to be reviewed quite well. The wider tires are throwing me, but the reviews say it might only be a hair lower than a Roubaix (for example).

So the question... as we know, bikes aren't cheap. I'd want to take the logical step up from my Secteur, but I'm not sure how much is appropriate. I'm looking at two models. The Diverge Sport ($2100) - I don't URL privilege, sorry- and the Diverge Comp ($3000) - . $2100 is a lot of money, but I feel like I can justify that. $3,000 on the other hand starts to get into the "I feel guilty spending this" range. On a superficial level, the white on the Comp is slick looking.

I am not educated on the mechanics though. Are the mechanics on the Comp that much better than it'd make sense to go ahead and spend the extra money? I'd like to get a good enough bike that I will want to use for the long haul and not want to upgrade in a few years. I'm not sure if both of these bikes fall into that 'good enough' range or not.

Opinions?

GailT 02-16-18 09:05 AM

I test road the Diverge and Roubaix several times. I think the Diverge is a great choice - very stable and comfortable bike. The Sport has mechanical disc brakes and the lower cost Tiagra components. It is difficult to say whether it is worth $900 to upgrade to hydraulic brakes and 105 components. If you have not already done test rides, you could try riding each to see if the difference in brakes matters to you. I was ready to buy the Roubaix last fall, but absolutely could not decide whether it was worth the $1000 to upgrade from the Comp to the Expert. I really wanted the wheels on the Expert but could not justify the extra cost. In the end, I started looking at other options, decided I didn't really need a carbon frame or disc brakes, and got a custom steel frame bike that I can use for road and gravel. If you are not committed to carbon, you might consider looking for used or demo steel bikes. As an example, there is a very nice demo Gunnar Crosshairs gravel bike on ebay for $1700, and there might be other good value options. But if you are committed to the Diverge, you might try negotiating a lower price on the Comp.

pdoege 02-16-18 11:28 AM

I bought the Roubaix and installed 32mm tires

It fits as well as my Secteur and is much more comfortable and a bit lighter

WhyFi 02-16-18 12:24 PM

11-speed and hydro are worthwhile upgrades, but the $3k price doesn't seem like a great value. The Domane SL 5 Gravel (I recently picked one up) is similarly spec'd for $2500, if you can find one. If you can't find one, the 'regular' Domane SL 5 Disc is the same bike but with 105-level hydro levers (RS-505), slightly skinnier stock tires and a different paint job.

pesape 02-16-18 02:08 PM

Without quoting everyone... I kind of landed on Specialized when I bought my first bike. I was happy with the Secteur, so was trying to stay with Specialized. Is there a reason outside of maybe cost that I should steer away? Are they generally more expensive than other brands for similar components?
The Diverge sounds interesting because it's purpose more aligns with what I like to do. Are there other brands (and which models) that I should at least take a look at? Again, I like the idea of the Diverge, but if I were to spend $3000, that amount of money definitely warrants some research.

pesape 02-16-18 02:10 PM

One other question - Can you actually negotiate with a bike shop? $3000 (if I go that route) is a ton of money. I'd love to get it for a lower price. Hell even the tax will be $300 on that.

dim 02-16-18 03:03 PM

I've just bought a gravel/adventure bike today. I'm in the UK and I made a shortlist of a few bikes. My budget was not great, (700), and with that money, I decided to buy something on the used market.

I wanted a bike that could take wider tyres, have eyelets for mudguards/rack, be very comfortable and be fairly light. This bike is to be used as my daily commuter (250km/week), aswell as for some Audax rides (I have another light fast bike if I'm worried about time and speed)

Specialized Diverge Comp was one that was high on my shortlist. I spent several days researching and Googling and I really like these Diverge bikes. Good reviews, but there are mixed feelings about the 'suspension system' in the handlebars ....I pondered about this and wondered how the bike would feel on steep hills when you are standing and pedalling, and the whole time the handlebar is operating like a jackhammer in slow motion? ...I never read bad reviews abouth this though, and if I was not comfortable with how it felt, I could change it

If I remember correctly, mudguards are another issue.... you have to use the specialized ones, but that did not bother me. I really like these Diverge bikes

However, I ended up buying a Whyte Suffolk today.... I will have a new wheelset built .... HED Belgium Plus rims (tubeless ready as I will use Tubeless tyres, Dynamo hub and Lighting, and a rear rack (most probably a Tubus Fly), I have a spare Brooks C17 Cambium Carved saddle) and thats it .... I only bought it today, have never ridden one yet so I hope that it's comfy

one thing to be very careful about, is the geometry. You may need to get one size smaller than what you normally use (I normally ride a 54, but I bought a 52 as the geometry is similar ... a 54 would be too big for me....

so, if you can get a good deal on a Diverge, buy it! I was searching for my size daily, and if one came up in good condition and whitin my budget, I would have snapped it up

here's my Whyte: (I paid 650 plus 30 shipping) ... I really like the Whyte Wessex (top of the range and carbon) which is waaaaay out of my budget, but if this one fits well, I may save up for the Wessex

this one weighs just under 10Kg as you see it, but the wheels are heavy

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/SPkAA...zR/s-l1600.jpg

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/dTMAA...zg/s-l1600.jpg

WhyFi 02-16-18 04:13 PM


Originally Posted by pesape (Post 20173308)
Without quoting everyone... I kind of landed on Specialized when I bought my first bike. I was happy with the Secteur, so was trying to stay with Specialized. Is there a reason outside of maybe cost that I should steer away? Are they generally more expensive than other brands for similar components?

Specialized makes some fine bikes and, in general, there's a lot of price-point parity. In this instance, though, It strikes me as a little more spendy that the competition.


Originally Posted by pesape (Post 20173308)
The Diverge sounds interesting because it's purpose more aligns with what I like to do. Are there other brands (and which models) that I should at least take a look at? Again, I like the idea of the Diverge, but if I were to spend $3000, that amount of money definitely warrants some research.

There's a growing segment that typically goes by 'gravel' or 'adventure' - it sounds as if anything in this range would take care of your wants/needs. These bikes are often quite similar to another category of bikes, the 'endurance' category, except they'll generally take some wider tires (often up to 40mm or more). It doesn't sound as if you're going to spend a lot of miles off the pavement, and it doesn't sound as if the conditions will be that challenging when you are off-pavement, so I would think that just about any disc-equipped endurance bike that'll clear ~32mm tires would work just dandy.


Originally Posted by pesape (Post 20173312)
One other question - Can you actually negotiate with a bike shop? $3000 (if I go that route) is a ton of money. I'd love to get it for a lower price. Hell even the tax will be $300 on that.

You can always ask. Typically, shops are more willing to deal if it's a bike that's in stock and/or a previous model year. Some shops won't concede much, if anything, on the price of the bike, but will often cut you a deal on apparel/accessories bought at the same time, so if you need any other stuff, it might be good to have that list in the back of your mind going in.

San Pedro 02-16-18 05:27 PM

Seems like for that kind of money there are better bikes around. For $2100 in the States, I'd aim for 105 groupset with hydraulic disc brakes, at least if I was looking for an endurance bike.

Don't spend $3000, it sounds like you really don't want to, so just don't.

K R 04-10-18 01:50 PM

The Diverge E5 Comp is a good compromise. The Aluminum Frame may sacrifice a bit of compliance (comfort) but it rates well and has good equipment. If comfort and braking are important factors, the carbon frame, CG-R seat post and hydraulic brakes of the Diverge Comp IMHO are worth it. We just purchased two - my wife preferred the white rather than the Women's version and the LBS swapped out the bars and seat for her white one.

Garhel 04-10-18 02:57 PM

For what its worth, I got 10% off my Roubaix - when I went to the store originally I was offered 10% value in accessories, then after going away to think about it (it's still a lot of money!) and coming back he offered me 10% discount - which I then spent on accessories anyway!!!

Edited to add - for me, the premium for the Roubaix comp was worth the extra - drivetrain upgrade, including the brakes, nicer wheels, a few other bits and bobs, and of course a nice sparkly paint job...

Maelochs 04-10-18 03:20 PM

Two considerations: The Specialized bikes you mentioned seem a bit overpriced ...for $2100 i expect 105 and hydro discs.

I have no allegiance to any brand---I simply don't care. When i want a bike i decide what I want it to do and what components it needs to have. Then i shop for the mechanicals. The name on the downtube has Zero to do with how the bike functions.

Second: some gravel bikes have built-in suspension. if that matters, that determines the bike you buy. if not ... look at Every brand that sells a bike that has what you want. (Check out this thread, too: https://www.bikeforums.net/general-c...ke-advice.html)

Seriously, though you had good luck with one Specialized .... but if you had bought a Giant or a Fuji or a Trek or a Cannondale and had Exactly the same experience.

The bike is a sum of working parts. The manufacturer's decal is not one of those parts. get the Most bike for the money, is my approach.

On the other hand, if you Want a Specialized, Get a Specialized, and love it to death. Why not?

WhyFi 04-10-18 07:12 PM


Originally Posted by Maelochs (Post 20276821)
...for $2100 i expect 105 and hydro discs.

Unless you're going with a direct-to-consumer brand, ~$2500 is about the entry point for carbon with 105-level hydros. Very few bikes that you can see on a shop floor will come in under that - the REI's in-house brand has one for about $2300 or so, but I can't think of any others off the top of my head.

softreset 04-11-18 11:19 AM


Originally Posted by pesape (Post 20173312)
One other question - Can you actually negotiate with a bike shop? $3000 (if I go that route) is a ton of money. I'd love to get it for a lower price. Hell even the tax will be $300 on that.

I was able to pick up a Niner RLT 9 Steel (4-star) for $3100 from my local shop, sticker on the bike is $3800 with minimal negotiations and a little bit of market research.

So it's absolutely possible.

I'd also like to add that your best crack at a "max discount" is on a bike that's on the floor/in-stock and is either already on closeout or about to be with the model year cutover.

utoner34 01-09-19 11:59 AM

Have you seen this?

https://www.specialized.com/fr/fr/safety-notices

winston63 01-09-19 02:33 PM


Originally Posted by K R (Post 20276606)
The Diverge E5 Comp is a good compromise. The Aluminum Frame may sacrifice a bit of compliance (comfort) but it rates well and has good equipment. If comfort and braking are important factors, the carbon frame, CG-R seat post and hydraulic brakes of the Diverge Comp IMHO are worth it. We just purchased two - my wife preferred the white rather than the Women's version and the LBS swapped out the bars and seat for her white one.

I bought a 2018 Diverge E5 Comp and I'm very happy with it.

I have a light carbon bike for good weather riding (Scott Solace) but I wanted something for year round road riding with the ability to tackle some gravel and the Aluminum Diverge fits the bill just fine.

It does have mech disc brakes though, that might be a compromise some are unwilling to make. But the bike handles very nicely, the 105 drivetrain is great and I love the ability to run wider tires and fenders for wet weather riding.

tedder987 01-09-19 08:49 PM

FWIW Hydro is far superior to mechanical discs and is worth a few $$. As the owner of a '17 Roubaix I love the future shock and normally run it with 32mm panaracer gravel king slicks for pretty much any conditions (6283 miles in 2018).

There is a recall (today) on any future shock equipped bike today (1/9/2019). I called my LBS and Spz and its a replacement of the collar on top of the FS. No one has been hurt (supposedly according to Spz) but they can crack. New ones are being distributed to LBS any day now.

SO, might the FS be an issue long term? Maybe. On the other hand, even though I am mostly on road (commuting mind you) I'll never buy something with a solid front again. Spz Roubaix/Diverge, Trek Domane, Lauf True Grit, or add a redshift shockstop suspension stem to something else. As an old (51) and big (6'3", 205lb) guy, comfort matters more than a few grams, and the future shock works better than bigger tires do (and I have run 25,26,28,30,32 and 33's on the roubaix).

To sum it up -
test ride + bike fit > tech or brand or model

(... but get hydro discs ...)

radroad 01-09-19 09:08 PM


Originally Posted by pesape (Post 20171716)
I'm thinking of getting a new bike and am leaning towards the Diverge but wanted to get some opinions on specific models.

I currently have a Specialized Secteur Elite that I bought new roughly 5-6 years ago. The bike shop recommended that one for someone just getting into a road bike and for someone with my preference for ride location. We have miles and miles of wide paved walking/biking trails in KC that take you through woods, by creeks, etc. that I greatly prefer over true riding on the road. That bike was ~$1400-$1500.

That information is key as it relates to why I'm leaning towards the Diverge and why I'm trying to decide on which model. I never road in the winter due to cold weather, and with a little kids at home, it was also hard to be gone for a few hours riding as much as I'd like. Because of that, about a year and half ago, I bought a trainer and hooked up my bike to that. I now use it everyday on the trainer for cardio during normal workouts. Given that I use the trainer so much, I don't want to mess with taking it off, buying a new rim and tire to switch out the training tire, riding, and then doing putting it all back together. Leading to me wanting a new bike...

I found out that the Diverge is basically the Secteur (or replaced it a few years back). I was checking out bikes last year but in looking at the Diverge and Roubaix, I learned that the 2018 Diverge would basically be a 'new' model. I also wasn't sure the Roubaix would really be the right bike for what I wanted. While I wouldn't mind the option of a possible group ride, again my main purpose will be paved bike paths though those could be slightly muddy or have some lose dirt or gravel in spots.

Fast forward to now... the 2018 Diverge looks like the best bike to suit my needs, and it seems to be reviewed quite well. The wider tires are throwing me, but the reviews say it might only be a hair lower than a Roubaix (for example).

So the question... as we know, bikes aren't cheap. I'd want to take the logical step up from my Secteur, but I'm not sure how much is appropriate. I'm looking at two models. The Diverge Sport ($2100) - I don't URL privilege, sorry- and the Diverge Comp ($3000) - . $2100 is a lot of money, but I feel like I can justify that. $3,000 on the other hand starts to get into the "I feel guilty spending this" range. On a superficial level, the white on the Comp is slick looking.

I am not educated on the mechanics though. Are the mechanics on the Comp that much better than it'd make sense to go ahead and spend the extra money? I'd like to get a good enough bike that I will want to use for the long haul and not want to upgrade in a few years. I'm not sure if both of these bikes fall into that 'good enough' range or not.

Opinions?

How wide of a tire do you need. That will be the main differentiating factor. Alu diverge can accept up to 35?mm. Carbon a bit wider than that. Secteur: 28 or 32 max.

The diverge may or may not offer a futureshock. You can add on a suspension stem to your current bike for $140.

$2100: probably mechanical disc, 10 speed, 35 or 38 mm tires.

$3K: hydraulic? 11 speed? 40 mm tires?

$3K is a lot of coin for paved paths with a little loose dirt. Try wider tires and redshift suspension first: $100 + $140 = $240. Savings of over $3K assuming tax.

fastfour 01-09-19 10:44 PM

I own both an 18 Diverge and a 19 Roubaix. I bought a 2018 Diverge Comp E5 for $1600 in March of last year and have really enjoyed it. I ride it nearly every day to commute and did/do weekend rides (even did a century on it in Sept.) It's super comfortable and can be ridden quickly easily. I did upgrade the cranks from the Praxis Alba to Shimano 105 to get the groupset up to full 105. ( I broke a few teeth off the big ring and an upgrade to 105 was suggested by my mechanic) I also picked up some beefier wheels (ditched the Axis stockers for some beefy DT Swiss 500db's. I would love it to have hydro discs but to be honest the cable operated disc units have worked well.

And to the poster earlier that said only Specialized fenders work on the bike is mistaken. I did use those at first and they were awful. They broke at the mounting points twice before I bit the bullet for Portland Design Works fenders and haven't looked back.

I bought a 2019 Roubaix Comp Ultegra Di2 equipped bike a couple of weeks ago for $3700 and have really enjoyed it as well. It's several lbs lighter and being carbon is much stiffer. It rides like a dream and is a bit faster/more nimble than the Diverge. Lots of new PR's on my routes with the Roubaix and even a KOM that I've been chasing for awhile on the Diverge.

Hope this helps.

Caliwild 01-10-19 11:04 AM

It looks like the cheaper variants of the Diverge do NOT have futureshock, which might be a good thing...


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