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New shift housing time - What to get?

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New shift housing time - What to get?

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Old 04-30-18, 07:30 AM
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rosefarts
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New shift housing time - What to get?

Like the title says. Time for new shift housing. The bike has 10 speed Campy Chorus.

It's a little sluggish at times. Probably nothing that some adjustment and new coated shift cables wouldn't fix. However, I am replacing the handlebar when I have a few free minutes so I'll be unwrapped, might as well get to the housing while I can. I suppose I could do the brakes too, although they are performing perfectly.

Normally, I just use SIS housing cut to length from the reel at the shop. In fact, I have enough new SIS housing in my garage that I wouldn't need to even get more. I am more finicky with this bike so I'd be very interested in something that works better.

In order of priority, I want shift quality and durability. Things like price, weight, and ease of installation are secondary to the right cable.

I'm not opposed to plain stuff either. Ideas?
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Old 04-30-18, 08:22 AM
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t595
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I did the Jag wire conversion on a Shimano setup a couple of years ago (both inner and outer). Inner cable broke after about 6000 miles. Cannot recommend that one.
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Old 04-30-18, 08:40 AM
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I used to get the official Campagnolo shift and brake cable set. That works great, but it's very expensive if all I need to do is replace the right shift cable & housing. The brake cables are usually still good, and I don't swap them out very often.

For my 11-speed Campagnolo Athena/Chorus mix, I purchased a length of the bulk Jagwire housing and two cables from the LBS. It works great, and isn't expensive. (I don't know if it was Jagwire Sport, or Jagwire Basics.)


Originally Posted by t595 View Post
I did the Jag wire conversion on a Shimano setup a couple of years ago (both inner and outer). Inner cable broke after about 6000 miles. Cannot recommend that one.
Broken shift cables
Campagnolo shifters have a sharp bend in the cable to route it under the tape. I assume Shimano is similar. That bend flexes with each shift, and eventually the strands in the cable start breaking. So there's a very short period of "my shifting needs adjusting", then "hey, it missed a shift, I had to shift 2 then back 1", then the rest of the cable breaks. (Usually all in the same ride, no long term warnings!)

It's very tedious to fish out the cable end with it's stub of frayed cable strands. (And Shimano stubs are even more difficult, I've heard.) A spare cable brought on the ride would be very difficult to replace out on the road.

I shift a lot. I've had two broken cables on rides. So now, I try to replace the right shifter cable within about 2000 to 2500 miles, maybe 3000 miles at times. That's more than once a year. I'll replace the housing for every other cable replacement. The old cable usually looks perfect, but the metal fatigue in the strands isn't visible.

Pulling back the hood, there's a little window where the cable makes the bend, so it's possible to inspect it regularly. I don't think Shimano has the same view.

Last edited by rm -rf; 04-30-18 at 08:59 AM.
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Old 04-30-18, 08:49 AM
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If cost is no object, there's always Jagwire Elite Link. I don't think you can get better shift quality, mechanically.
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Old 04-30-18, 09:33 AM
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I too find that the midgrade Jagwire stuff works well.

Originally Posted by rm -rf View Post
Campagnolo shifters have a sharp bend in the cable to route it under the tape. I assume Shimano is similar. That bend flexes with each shift, and eventually the strands in the cable start breaking. So there's a very short period of "my shifting needs adjusting", then "hey, it missed a shift, I had to shift 2 then back 1", then the rest of the cable breaks. (Usually all in the same ride, no long term warnings!)
Yes, Shimano -- at least 6800 and 9000 -- have a similar bend, and your description of how they fail is right on. Happened to me just last week at about 5,000 miles on the shift cable.
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Old 04-30-18, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by GuitarBob View Post
I too find that the midgrade Jagwire stuff works well..
That's what I'm using on the bike I rebuilt Friday. Some colors use a translucent casing that allows the braided structural part to show through.

https://jagwire.com/products/diy-cab...s/road-pro-kit
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Old 04-30-18, 10:04 AM
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If price is secondary, why not use Campagnolo Ultrashift cables?
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Old 04-30-18, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by t595 View Post
I did the Jag wire conversion on a Shimano setup a couple of years ago (both inner and outer). Inner cable broke after about 6000 miles. Cannot recommend that one.
Which Shimano? There was one particular set of shifters that likes to eat cables.

I've used the jagwire mid-range cables and the sealed cables, both work great although the sealed ones are harder to work with and probably not worth it for me (in SoCal)
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Old 04-30-18, 11:26 AM
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I use Jagwire as well. Never had an issue.
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Old 04-30-18, 12:29 PM
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A temporary fix if the, uh, "other rider" breaks a cable during a ride:

Pull the broken cable out of the housing leading to the shifter.
Loosen a bolt on the down tube bottle cage.

Get the chain onto the largest cog in the back. This is a lot easier with two riders, one to lift the bike to get the rear wheel off the ground and slowly turn the crank; the other person to push/twist the derailleur body inward to make it shift to the big cog.
Now hold the derailleur in place, while the other rider wraps the broken cable around the cage bolt and tightens it down.

The remaining slack coming out of the cable will move the derailleur back toward the middle of the cluster.
Now you can shift the front to each chainring to get two middle gears. And it will hold it's place until you get home. Other methods tend to slip.

Last edited by rm -rf; 04-30-18 at 12:33 PM.
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Old 04-30-18, 08:31 PM
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I have set up dozens of bikes with Jagwire slick housing i buy in rolls of 25' off Amazon for $20 and sunlite stainless cables i buy from the local collective for $1.50/cablr.
Every bike has shifted fine.

All mine, which are 7sp, 9sp, 9sp, 9sp, 11sp, and 11sp shift as expected- quick and accurate.

What am i missing here? How is more expensive houaing better than housing that does what its supposed to do for $1/foot?
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Old 05-01-18, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
I have set up dozens of bikes with Jagwire slick housing i buy in rolls of 25' off Amazon for $20 and sunlite stainless cables i buy from the local collective for $1.50/cablr.
Every bike has shifted fine.

All mine, which are 7sp, 9sp, 9sp, 9sp, 11sp, and 11sp shift as expected- quick and accurate.

What am i missing here? How is more expensive houaing better than housing that does what its supposed to do for $1/foot?
Housing matters a bit less as long as it has a liner. The shimano polymer cables make a noticeable difference in shifting smoothness and effort but the coating doesn't last as long. The coating deteriorates about the same time as the cable heads begin to die so its not really an issue, but the coating clogs the housings so they need to be replaced with the cables. Not a big additional cost but worth the tradeoff IME. Ive heard the R8000/9100 coating is more durable
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Old 05-01-18, 09:43 AM
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I wouldn't use the coated cables. That PTFE coating comes off very easily, clogging up housings. I hate those cables, and I haven't found them to be any better in terms of performance.
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Old 05-01-18, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by cthenn View Post
I wouldn't use the coated cables. That PTFE coating comes off very easily, clogging up housings. I hate those cables, and I haven't found them to be any better in terms of performance.
this isn't an issue with Jagwire coated cables.
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Old 05-01-18, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by cthenn View Post
I wouldn't use the coated cables. That PTFE coating comes off very easily, clogging up housings. I hate those cables, and I haven't found them to be any better in terms of performance.
There's the PTFE clear coating and the polymer(not PTFE) brown coating, and the newer gray polymer coating. There is a difference, especially if you use the polymer coated cables on older 10 speed groupsets. I tried to set up a set of 11 speed shifters which stainless cables and the shifting works but is noticeably worse.
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Old 05-01-18, 04:23 PM
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Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
There's the PTFE clear coating and the polymer(not PTFE) brown coating, and the newer gray polymer coating. There is a difference, especially if you use the polymer coated cables on older 10 speed groupsets. I tried to set up a set of 11 speed shifters which stainless cables and the shifting works but is noticeably worse.
Hmm, didn't know that. I'm referring to the brown polymer coated ones. Didn't know there was another type of coating, but now that you describe it, I think I have some of those newer coated cables. I've been swapping/changing out shifters on a couple of bikes, and I think I got some of the newer cable types, because it looked like it was coated, but not with the same crappy brown stuff that flakes off.
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Old 05-01-18, 08:58 PM
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I'd skip the coated cables altogether. The coating is nothing but a problem waiting to happen. Try the Jagwire Elite ultra slick uncoated cables instead. No coating and they slide easier than the coated cables with no flaking issues.

I usually use a Campagnolo inners with Campagnolo housing on all my Campag systems. It just seems to work better than any of the others out there. And you don't need to purchase the entire Campag cable kit, both the inners and shift housing are available separately. If your LBS has a QBP account CA9858 is 680mm of Campagnolo derailleur housing, usually enough for a bike, and inners are CA9822. I usually find the housing on the bars lasts at least 2 inner cables, but the loop by the rear derailleur really takes a beating and needs to be replace with each new inner.

If you are breaking shift cables at the head more than likely the cable was installed improperly. There was probably a loose strand that worked its way all the way back to the head when the cable was installed. Lennard Zinn has an easy method to install the cables properly.

Last edited by RGMN; 05-01-18 at 09:00 PM. Reason: spelling
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