Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Group Rides with the Big Boys

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Group Rides with the Big Boys

Old 09-12-18, 12:19 PM
  #101  
Spoonrobot 
Senior Member
 
Spoonrobot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,996
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1174 Post(s)
Liked 115 Times in 81 Posts
Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
I bet I could train you to ride 100 miles faster than you've ever ridden them before using solely <20 mile rides.
You'd lose that bet except in very specific instances. There's more than just pedaling to riding 100 miles fast. I see lots of people make this mistake every year. Fastest century someone's ever ridden is going to require more than just training increments of 1-1.5 hours. No matter how hard.

How many 100 mile rides have you done?
Spoonrobot is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:21 PM
  #102  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,140
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1906 Post(s)
Liked 1,170 Times in 568 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
Maybe this new science doesn't apply to me?
If you're riding at low intensity either way, then adding breaks won't make you stronger. But if the question is thirty miles of aggressive 8-mile "intervals" with regroups, versus thirty miles of steady, things are more complicated.

I've done century rides with no "stamina" issues at times when the other rides I'd been doing were mostly forty miles or less with frequent regroups.

There are good reasons to do long rides while training for a century, such as sorting out fit and nutrition. But from a pure pedaling stamina point of view, you really don't need to ride long rides non-stop in order to ride longer rides non-stop.
HTupolev is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:24 PM
  #103  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
I'm sure you think you don't coast or softpedal. But you do. Get a pm. It'll quickly show you what's up.

Endurance is built by increasing training load. You can do that in any number of ways. Stopping isn't going to affect it. It's not that difficult to go ride 100 miles if youre riding 200 miles a week, even if you've never done over 60 or 70. How is that possible?

I said leaving people for dead on a group ride was dumb, with an aside concerning crashed riders as a response to someone else's post.

Your entire notion of what builds fitness is off base, so whatever argument you're trying to build from that is also very off base.
You said people were dumb for not having regroup points. I say they aren't dumb, they're just training to ride without stopping. This isn't my "notion of what builds fitness", it's what I see people do.

And I know I soft pedal. I never said I didn't soft pedal.
memebag is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:24 PM
  #104  
TimothyH
- Soli Deo Gloria -
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 14,782

Bikes: 2018 Rodriguez Custom Fixed Gear, 2017 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2015 Bianchi Pista, 2002 Fuji Robaix

Mentioned: 235 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6839 Post(s)
Liked 721 Times in 455 Posts
The conversation about coasting prompted me to do a 32 mile fixed gear road ride last night. It has been a while since I rode fixed on the road, lots of fun and my legs are sore today. Just wanted to thank you guys for that. I did stop for coffee though.

https://www.strava.com/activities/1835785542

I'm actually thinking about bringing the fixed gear to a group ride again. I did it a few times but all the shifting started to piss me off after a while.


-Tim-
TimothyH is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:34 PM
  #105  
redlude97
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,748
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1965 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 166 Posts
Originally Posted by Spoonrobot View Post
You'd lose that bet except in very specific instances. There's more than just pedaling to riding 100 miles fast. I see lots of people make this mistake every year. Fastest century someone's ever ridden is going to require more than just training increments of 1-1.5 hours. No matter how hard.

How many 100 mile rides have you done?
I've lost count but probably 40-50 including a couple double century days, only 5 so far this year but my training has been specifically for cyclocross. While there is more to riding a century than just pedalling, most people who measure their training in miles aren't likely doing the specific hard training to really increase their fitness substantially at that higher end. If someone has years and years of built up training of long distance riding, they don't have to build that up to do a century every year. I've with rubiksoval in that training should mostly be solo, and IME doesn't have to be particularly long if you are efficient with it, and know how to address specific physiological adaptions that occur at different intensities.
redlude97 is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:35 PM
  #106  
redlude97
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,748
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1965 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 166 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
If you're riding at low intensity either way, then adding breaks won't make you stronger. But if the question is thirty miles of aggressive 8-mile "intervals" with regroups, versus thirty miles of steady, things are more complicated.

I've done century rides with no "stamina" issues at times when the other rides I'd been doing were mostly forty miles or less with frequent regroups.

There are good reasons to do long rides while training for a century, such as sorting out fit and nutrition. But from a pure pedaling stamina point of view, you really don't need to ride long rides non-stop in order to ride longer rides non-stop.
Exactly
redlude97 is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:41 PM
  #107  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 4,444

Bikes: bikes

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2620 Post(s)
Liked 1,429 Times in 711 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
You said people were dumb for not having regroup points. I say they aren't dumb, they're just training to ride without stopping. This isn't my "notion of what builds fitness", it's what I see people do.

And I know I soft pedal. I never said I didn't soft pedal.
At this point, I'd say you're just saying stuff to be saying it. Everything you've asserted or "seen" or "remembered" has been off-base.
rubiksoval is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:52 PM
  #108  
Spoonrobot 
Senior Member
 
Spoonrobot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,996
Mentioned: 63 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1174 Post(s)
Liked 115 Times in 81 Posts
Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
I've lost count but probably 40-50 including a couple double century days,
That's what I was thinking. The more expert one is in an endeavor the easier it becomes to forget what a beginner is experiencing. Regardless I think we are discussing two different things as I was taking your assertion as directed at someone who appeared to be a beginner with essentially no long distance base. Now it seems like he might just like arguing and not necessarily here to learn or share opinions.
Spoonrobot is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 12:59 PM
  #109  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,522

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 112 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3414 Post(s)
Liked 1,386 Times in 1,013 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
<snip>Maybe this new science doesn't apply to me? I can do a bunch of 30 mile rides, but I'm not ready for a 100 mile ride until I work up to some 60 and 70 mile rides. And I can't skip rest stops on the 100 mile ride if I stop frequently on the 70 mile ride.
I doesn't apply unless you do it. How about this? Instead of doing "a bunch of 30 mile rides," you go out Tuesday and do 30 miles, including four 10 minute hill repeats on a long hill, going as hard as you can and not blow up in 10 minutes. Rest time is coasting back down for the next one. If you don't have any hills, do the same thing in the drops. 100 cadence, hard effort, 10 minutes, 5 minutes easy pedaling, repeat 4 times.

Then Thursday go out for 25 miles and do speed work: Somewhere convenient on the ride, pedal absolutely as hard as you can on the flat for 30 seconds, in the saddle, starting in a pretty big gear and shifting up as necessary. Then 5 minutes of moderate pedaling. Repeat 6 times.

Then next weekend, do 50 miles at a good pace, preferably in the hills at about 50'/mile climbing. With the group is fine.

Repeat for 3 weeks. You'll notice a difference. Then try something similar on your group rides. The idea is to return to the parking lot unable to dismount the bike. That's how hard you want to go on those 50 mile rides. You don't need instrumentation to do that. Just turn yourself inside out, bits of lung on your shoes, that sort of thing.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 01:32 PM
  #110  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,522

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 112 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3414 Post(s)
Liked 1,386 Times in 1,013 Posts
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
The conversation about coasting prompted me to do a 32 mile fixed gear road ride last night. It has been a while since I rode fixed on the road, lots of fun and my legs are sore today. Just wanted to thank you guys for that. I did stop for coffee though.

https://www.strava.com/activities/1835785542

I'm actually thinking about bringing the fixed gear to a group ride again. I did it a few times but all the shifting started to piss me off after a while.


-Tim-
We had a 2 who used to come out with us in winter on his fixed. Fixed is hard with 22 mph pacelines, but heck, I used to do it SS, not fixed, but it's similar. 35 miles of that is usually enough. That 2 became our local crit champ. It's good training, no doubt about it. I remember one time him coming up to the front to scream at us to slow down! It's only possible to pedal 70 g.i. so fast and I was never strong enough to do 10% grades in your gear.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 01:48 PM
  #111  
redlude97
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,748
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1965 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 166 Posts
Originally Posted by Spoonrobot View Post
That's what I was thinking. The more expert one is in an endeavor the easier it becomes to forget what a beginner is experiencing. Regardless I think we are discussing two different things as I was taking your assertion as directed at someone who appeared to be a beginner with essentially no long distance base. Now it seems like he might just like arguing and not necessarily here to learn or share opinions.
Yea, the person I quoted isn't a beginner, just someone how trains by distance. We've all likely been there at some point in our cycling, but some of us see the light and learn to train smarter. I'm the fastest I've been been at any distance this year and I've done way less long rides
redlude97 is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 01:50 PM
  #112  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
I doesn't apply unless you do it. How about this? Instead of doing "a bunch of 30 mile rides," you go out Tuesday and do 30 miles, including four 10 minute hill repeats ...
Hill? What is this "hill" you speak of?

Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
At this point, I'd say you're just saying stuff to be saying it. Everything you've asserted or "seen" or "remembered" has been off-base.
So I haven't seen what I've seen? I don't remember what I remember? Please, enlighten me about my own experience.
memebag is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 01:59 PM
  #113  
Dean V
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,848
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1065 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 253 Times in 150 Posts
Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
I've lost count but probably 40-50 including a couple double century days, only 5 so far this year but my training has been specifically for cyclocross. While there is more to riding a century than just pedalling, most people who measure their training in miles aren't likely doing the specific hard training to really increase their fitness substantially at that higher end. If someone has years and years of built up training of long distance riding, they don't have to build that up to do a century every year. I've with rubiksoval in that training should mostly be solo, and IME doesn't have to be particularly long if you are efficient with it, and know how to address specific physiological adaptions that occur at different intensities.
Personally I know that if I am to ride a century fast I need to do some long rides in the build up.
Some people seem to manage without the long rides, sort of, but I don't think you can "race" for 4 or 5hrs with only 1.5hr max training rides.
Even in the "Time Crunched Cyclist" he concedes that this short intense training is insufficient for 3hr + races.
Dean V is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 02:15 PM
  #114  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 4,444

Bikes: bikes

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2620 Post(s)
Liked 1,429 Times in 711 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post


So I haven't seen what I've seen? I don't remember what I remember? Please, enlighten me about my own experience.
You don't understand what you've seen, and your assessment of your experience is inaccurate. In addition, you've attempted to attribute things to what you've seen and experienced that are not correct.
rubiksoval is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 02:26 PM
  #115  
memebag
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 1,597

Bikes: 2017 Cannondale CAAD12 105, 2014 Giant Escape City

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 820 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
You don't understand what you've seen, and your assessment of your experience is inaccurate. In addition, you've attempted to attribute things to what you've seen and experienced that are not correct.
I have seen riders skip rest stops during group training rides. They believe (and their performance demonstrates) that helps them skip rest stops during long charity rides.

Did I dream that? Are they all dummies? Please, please, please share your wisdom. I will immediately tell them the error of their ways.
memebag is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 02:34 PM
  #116  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 4,380
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 920 Post(s)
Liked 360 Times in 219 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
Did I dream that? Are they all dummies? Please, please, please share your wisdom. I will immediately tell them the error of their ways.
Post hoc ergo propter hoc. Don’t worry, you’re not the first.
asgelle is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 02:37 PM
  #117  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 7,387
Mentioned: 66 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2524 Post(s)
Liked 1,577 Times in 1,021 Posts
One could argue that skipping rest stops could yield an overall better time at said event. You can pee on the bike like a true triathlete does. (at least that is what I have been told) That will save some time. Have enough fuel and water to take you the whole distance. That will net you some time savings.
seypat is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 02:39 PM
  #118  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 4,444

Bikes: bikes

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2620 Post(s)
Liked 1,429 Times in 711 Posts
Originally Posted by memebag View Post
I have seen riders skip rest stops during group training rides. They believe (and their performance demonstrates) that helps them skip rest stops during long charity rides.

Did I dream that? Are they all dummies? Please, please, please share your wisdom. I will immediately tell them the error of their ways.
You saw them not stop, but your assertion that their performance demonstrates that is wrong.

They're not dummies. They're just ignorant.

Tell them. Explain to them about coasting and soft-pedaling, too.
rubiksoval is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 02:57 PM
  #119  
redlude97
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 4,748
Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1965 Post(s)
Liked 224 Times in 166 Posts
Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
Personally I know that if I am to ride a century fast I need to do some long rides in the build up.
Some people seem to manage without the long rides, sort of, but I don't think you can "race" for 4 or 5hrs with only 1.5hr max training rides.
Even in the "Time Crunched Cyclist" he concedes that this short intense training is insufficient for 3hr + races.
Certainly some long rides would be optimal and a good plan would incorporate both, but if I had to pick between lots of short focused interval based training, and only doing longish rides with no structure and basing my training on skipping rest stops I'd bet I could get more out of someone doing the intervals, even if the plan would seem extreme. Ideal training would be somewhere in the middle with 1 long ride a week with less structure on say a group ride, with many shorter interval days and Z2 rides during the week.
redlude97 is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 03:13 PM
  #120  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 40,774

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Canyon Exceed, Specialized Transition, Ellsworth Roots, Ridley Excalibur

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2912 Post(s)
Liked 2,967 Times in 1,362 Posts
Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
To give an example: my rides are typically 400-500 feet of elevation every 10 miles. There are zero redlights on my routes and a minimum of intersections. About the very best I can do is less than 8% of total time in Z1. 10% is usually the goal on my solo rides to ensure I'm maximizing my time. That's 6 minutes of z1 in 60.

And that's with about the minimum interruptions I can achieve on open roads.

In a group ride, it gets closer to 40-50% as Caloso mentioned simply because any time you're not on the front you're having to check up and coast in the draft. Then there's the additional slowing at turns and intersections and downhills and the like. Any downhill grade in a group in which you're not on the front is almost always in z1 or coasting simply to avoid rolling up into the person in front of you.

All of those seconds quickly add up to minutes and on longer rides add up to hours.
You'd really have to focus to get it under 10%. I looked at this morning's ride, which was an out and back 2x30' sweet spot ride. By excluding all the data that was not part of the main interval set, it was still 9% Z1. Including all the rest (riding from my house to the start of the workout and then riding to the office after), I'm now up to 30% Z1.

Power data is really eye opening.
caloso is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 03:20 PM
  #121  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 4,380
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 920 Post(s)
Liked 360 Times in 219 Posts
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
You'd really have to focus to get it under 10%. I looked at this morning's ride, which was an out and back 2x30' sweet spot ride. By excluding all the data that was not part of the main interval set, it was still 9% Z1. Including all the rest (riding from my house to the start of the workout and then riding to the office after), I'm now up to 30% Z1.

Power data is really eye opening.
it is eye opening. I understand the issue here, but remember normalized power uses a 30 second rolling average because 30 seconds is the typical half-life of many metabolic processes. One must be careful looking at time in zone for a ride to distinguish between meaningful durations and an accumulation of very short excursions that have no real effect.
asgelle is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 03:26 PM
  #122  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4904 Post(s)
Liked 1,727 Times in 956 Posts
Further example, in my case Z1 power is 1-159W. In a three hour solo ride of typical intensity, I might be in that Z1 for as much as 40 minutes. Going down a slight incline, say -0.5%, I'll average ~140W @ 20mph. Z1 power and HR for 10, 15, even 20 minutes, all in one go.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 07:53 PM
  #123  
kbarch
Senior Member
 
kbarch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 4,286
Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1096 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
The conversation about coasting prompted me to do a 32 mile fixed gear road ride last night. It has been a while since I rode fixed on the road, lots of fun and my legs are sore today. Just wanted to thank you guys for that. I did stop for coffee though.

https://www.strava.com/activities/1835785542

I'm actually thinking about bringing the fixed gear to a group ride again. I did it a few times but all the shifting started to piss me off after a while.


-Tim-
Nice. But group rides....?
I did one group ride with friends and one mega event with the fixed gear: never again. The ride with friends wasn't bad - actually, in many ways it was fun - but what I had a hard time with was people in front not maintaining speed up rollers or the way they'd coast prematurely - I'd start creeping up on them and just did NOT want to lose any of that precious momentum by braking in any way. It wasn't so difficult, effort-wise, it just drove me bananas. If it's not too spirited or serious-pace-liney of a ride, I don't mind if a friend brings his fixed gear. I just don't like to ride directly behind him - he likes to skid, and sharply swerve, and it freaks me out.
The mega event was a NYC Century - the distance and elevation were not the challenge - the killer was all the stopping and starting at intersections and such.

Last edited by kbarch; 09-12-18 at 07:57 PM.
kbarch is offline  
Old 09-12-18, 08:13 PM
  #124  
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 18,522

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 112 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3414 Post(s)
Liked 1,386 Times in 1,013 Posts
Originally Posted by redlude97 View Post
Certainly some long rides would be optimal and a good plan would incorporate both, but if I had to pick between lots of short focused interval based training, and only doing longish rides with no structure and basing my training on skipping rest stops I'd bet I could get more out of someone doing the intervals, even if the plan would seem extreme. Ideal training would be somewhere in the middle with 1 long ride a week with less structure on say a group ride, with many shorter interval days and Z2 rides during the week.
I gotta say, I've been doing what you recommend for 20+ years and it works like a frigging charm. Took me a couple years to figure that out. That said, the last 2 or 3 weekend rides I'll lead, 3 to 4 weeks before a target endurance ride, will be increasing length group rides in similar terrain to the target ride, then we'll taper. That'll show up any weak spots and maybe repair them. We'll take breaks about every 30 miles on those rides.

"I always say" that if one is in decent riding condition, one can ride a century on any given day, no problem. OTOH, a 10,000' century will demand a little more respect.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 09-13-18, 03:40 AM
  #125  
OBoile
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,744
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1001 Post(s)
Liked 307 Times in 188 Posts
I remember a study on jogging that said alternating periods of walking and jogging (I don't remember the exact ratios , but it was something like 5 minutes jogging then 1 minute walking) caused just as much fitness gains as jogging the entire time. Based on that (and common sense) I would think that stopping for a couple of minutes every so often to allow people to catch up wouldn't hurt your fitness in any meaningful way.

The only case I can think of where that would be a problem would be with respect to holding your position on the bike. I know that when I ride in the country, away from the stop lights I usually encounter, I find that my back gets tight/sore after a while with no breaks. This only happens on the first couple of rides, then I'm used to it. Having stops, whether to wait for others, or at a traffic light, lets me change my position and give my back a break. If I knew I was going to do a serious long ride (say a fondo are a race) without stops, I'd want to replicate this at least once or twice in training. But these wouldn't need to be fast rides.
OBoile is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.