Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Solo riding - does it build strength/speed?

Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Solo riding - does it build strength/speed?

Closed Thread

Old 09-14-18, 05:15 AM
  #51  
Stormsedge
Senior Member
 
Stormsedge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 537

Bikes: 2017 Trek Domane SL6 Disc, 1990 Schwinn Crosscut Frankenroadbike, 2000 Gary Fisher Tassajara

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 122 Post(s)
I do most of my riding solo out of necessity and schedule conflicts. When I ride organized events, however, I tend to push myself harder.

This week, I rode two local training rides (one MTB/one road) and was interested to see my HR sustained at a higher level over an extended period...guess I'll try to get to more of these rides in the future.
Stormsedge is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 05:20 AM
  #52  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 3,569
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
But what Asgelle wrote again in my opinion is wrong. Body strength can be gained on the bike. This gain in strength may not even be easy to measure because it doesn't correlate to leg presses or arm curls or bench press lb force. It is the type of entire body strength to propel a bicycle faster.
I donít know what you mean by body strength. Strength is the maximum force or tension that can be produced by a muscle or muscle group and itís easy to measure both in vivo and in vitro. The type of ďbody strengthĒ that propels a bike faster is no strength at all. Itís power.
asgelle is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 05:30 AM
  #53  
Paul Barnard
For The Fun of It
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Louisissippi Coast
Posts: 3,110

Bikes: Garage full of bikes

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 534 Post(s)
Originally Posted by asgelle View Post

I donít know what you mean by body strength. Strength is the maximum force or tension that can be produced by a muscle or muscle group and itís easy to measure both in vivo and in vitro. The type of ďbody strengthĒ that propels a bike faster is no strength at all. Itís power.
Where are you getting your definition of strength? Has it occurred to you that the other posters may be using the word power in the dictionary sense?

You know what, disregard. Continue on with the nerd fight.
Paul Barnard is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 05:57 AM
  #54  
gregf83 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 8,511
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 759 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
Seriously. Think about that first sentence for a second. How does that make sense?

I don't lift because I don't lift. In fact, when I did lift in college, my max sprint was 1255w. In the last few years, after NOT lifting, I hit 1400+ multiple times and cracked 1500 once. That was after a whole lot of very specific on the bike work (including a lot of vo2 max work). Had a big impact on my peak power.

And no, I know plenty of people with sprints of 1200+ that don't ever lift. I know a guy that does 1600+ that doesn't lift. I'd imagine it's more a function of fast twitch muscles combined with technique than anything.

ETA: I don't sprint at 100 rpm, and no way on Earth I'm hitting anything remotely close to 1400 at 100 rpm. My sprints and max wattage are in the 120-125 rpm range, sometimes up to 130.
My comment was a response to the notion that strength isnít required for sprinting. I was merely pointing out that your legs are already strong and that the forces required in sprinting at 1400W are not insignificant. I also believe in the adage that ďsprinters are born, not madeĒ. If your legs have a low % of fast twitch fibers no amount of gym work will turn you into a sprinter. That doesnít mean one canít improve with strength training (on or off the bike).

Regarding your sprint rpm, Iím assuming you start lower than 120 and then wind it up while accelerating. Most power data Iíve seen has power flat or dropping during the final 20 Sec sprint so you probably still have some decent power at lower rpm. I have SRM data from some of Greipelís sprints where he was doing about 1350W from 90 to 100rpm.
gregf83 is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:10 AM
  #55  
Voodoo76
Blast from the Past
 
Voodoo76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Schertz TX
Posts: 3,013

Bikes: Ridley Excal, CAAD10, Dolan PreCursa, Cdale Slice

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 132 Post(s)
To the OP's question. Yes it can, in fact most strong racers do thier significant training sessions solo. If you are looking to hit specific power/duration goals on a given ride that is hard to do in a group.

To the nerd fight. There is a semantic issue with cycling and strength. Agree with asgelle the actual forces involved at say 300W are minimal. Comparable to even a body weight squat. I've seen more descriptive terms used, "muscular endurance" or the one I like "fatigue resistance", to describe the training impact of what some posters are calling strength. Stuff like standing reps, big gear work, etc can be very adaptive & have an impact on your cycling ability. But they are not creating leg strength above a pretty low threshold.

Throwing sprint numbers around I haven't lifted in 20 years, still hit 1200W & change max at 62 and don't feel I'm particularly "strong" in the true sense of the word.

Last edited by Voodoo76; 09-14-18 at 06:13 AM.
Voodoo76 is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:14 AM
  #56  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 3,569
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Voodoo76 View Post
Stuff like standing reps, big gear work, etc can be very adaptive & have an impact on your cycling ability.
That was already addressed. Why we don't use strength-endurance anymore ? aboc Cycle Coaching
asgelle is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:24 AM
  #57  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,011
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
Originally Posted by asgelle View Post

I don’t know what you mean by body strength. Strength is the maximum force or tension that can be produced by a muscle or muscle group and it’s easy to measure both in vivo and in vitro. The type of “body strength” that propels a bike faster is no strength at all. It’s power.
When I do intervals on the bike and I come home and rest, I have an overall body burn and pump to my muscles. Muscle tissue is torn down. It is because muscle tissue is torn down, that intervals can't be done all day long and everyday. After rest, muscle fibers rebuild stronger. Body's gain strength by interval training. To say otherwise is silly. You conflate or rather obfuscate power and strength. A component of Power is strength. Power isn't just power..lol.

Last edited by Campag4life; 09-14-18 at 06:27 AM.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:30 AM
  #58  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 3,569
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
When I do intervals on the bike and I come home and rest, I have an overall body burn and pump to my muscles. Muscle tissue it torn down. It is because muscle tissue is torn down, that intervals can't be done all day long and everyday. After rest, muscle fibers rebuild stronger. Body's gain strength by interval training. To say otherwise is silly. You conflate or rather obfuscate power and strength. A component of Power is strength. Power isn't just power..lol.
Donít confuse fatigue with lack of strength just because they feel similar. Fatigue (the inability to maintain an exercise intensity) is always multifactorial, but lack of glycogen is the leading cause of fatigue for efforts of long durations. You might want to familiarize yourself with Table 2 here https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/p...aining-levels/
asgelle is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:32 AM
  #59  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 2,148

Bikes: Felt AR

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1241 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
Do you have any documentation on that? Curious? I swim and bike ride. I believe that cycling builds some strength adds tone and some mass to my legs and swimming does the same for my upper body. My opinion. Agree with you weight bearing exercises in a gym may build more strength 'specific to those tests of strength' but pretty clear to me, the resistance of cycling and swimming will build body strength specific to 'cycling and swimming'. Intervals aka muscle overload in cycling build strength..again my opinion...but specific to cycling, and not necessarily a measurable test in the gym.

Would love to read an expert that suggests otherwise.

I agree that you don't have to be that strong to be a good cyclist. I know many other people that can push more weight in the gym and I can drop them on the bike. But there are cycling specific muscles as well.
I think you're confusing "body strength" with aerobic ability.
rubiksoval is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:33 AM
  #60  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,011
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
Originally Posted by asgelle View Post

Donít confuse fatigue with lack of strength just because they feel similar. Fatigue (the inability to maintain an exercise intensity) is always multifactorial, but lack of glycogen is the leading cause of fatigue for efforts of long durations. You might want to familiarize yourself with Table 2 here https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/p...aining-levels/
I think all said, we are going to just have to disagree. To me you further conflate. Fatigue is part of construct of building strength. Weight lifters lift to fatigue.
You have written that strength doesn't matter on the bike before. To me, its ridiculous but you clearly don't agree and arguing about likely won't change our minds.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:37 AM
  #61  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 2,148

Bikes: Felt AR

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1241 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
In bold above, then you disagree with asgelle then. You can build strength on the bike.
I would submit to you, you can build strength on the bike like you did and to put a finer point on it, the weight exercises you performed in the gym did not replicate precisely the muscles recruited for cycling. In fact, it is hard to find any weight bearing specific exercises in the gym including dead lifts that will increase body strength to appreciable increase sprint speed as you note. This has been documented...weight lifting in the gym don't necessarily make one a lot faster on the bike if any.

But what Asgelle wrote again in my opinion is wrong. Body strength can be gained on the bike. This gain in strength may not even be easy to measure because it doesn't correlate to leg presses or arm curls or bench press lb force. It is the type of entire body strength to propel a bicycle faster. In fact, a bit counterintuitive but leg presses on their own may slow a rider on the bike because the wrong muscles are bulked up to propel a
No, again. 400- 430 watt repeats for 3- 5 mins (what I was doing a lot of at the time ) are aerobic intervals.
rubiksoval is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:43 AM
  #62  
Voodoo76
Blast from the Past
 
Voodoo76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Schertz TX
Posts: 3,013

Bikes: Ridley Excal, CAAD10, Dolan PreCursa, Cdale Slice

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 132 Post(s)
Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
I've seen that particular study, and get his conclusions. My n=1 however is at this point in time, I am seeing real benefit to a recent addition of some (1 session/wk) low gear and standing reps (6 to 10m on) and some Tempo at reduced (On a long ride I target 30m or so 75rpm vs self selected 90-95) leg speed. My 20K time has improved, and my comfort level pushing a gear in Aero position has improved. Prior to this change I would loose power late in TT's and at the same time see my HR dropping. I interpreted this as a leg fatigue limiter not a cardio (fitness) issue. That specifically has improved, even at a much lower CTL.

I'm not saying this is for everyone, but I've been training for 40+ years and have a pretty good sense for when something is working for myself. Never really incorporated this into my training in the past, so I'm no zealot.
Voodoo76 is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:44 AM
  #63  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,011
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
I think you're confusing "body strength" with aerobic ability.
No. Power is the combination of body strength and aerobic capability. Yes, it could be argued that aerobic capability matters more. But strength matters and performing intervals on the bike like you did to gain sprinting speed increases your sprinting (no gym time) by increasing your body strength and aerobic capability.

Physics definition of Power as a function of time, is the rate at which work is done, so can be expressed by this equation: where P is power, W is work, and t is time. Because work is a force F applied over a distance r,




Definition: Force is a quantitative description of the interaction between two physical bodies, such as an object and its environment. Strength is the ability to apply Force.

Last edited by Campag4life; 09-14-18 at 06:49 AM.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:51 AM
  #64  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 2,148

Bikes: Felt AR

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1241 Post(s)
Originally Posted by gregf83 View Post
My comment was a response to the notion that strength isnít required for sprinting. I was merely pointing out that your legs are already strong and that the forces required in sprinting at 1400W are not insignificant. I also believe in the adage that ďsprinters are born, not madeĒ. If your legs have a low % of fast twitch fibers no amount of gym work will turn you into a sprinter. That doesnít mean one canít improve with strength training (on or off the bike).

Regarding your sprint rpm, Iím assuming you start lower than 120 and then wind it up while accelerating. Most power data Iíve seen has power flat or dropping during the final 20 Sec sprint so you probably still have some decent power at lower rpm. I have SRM data from some of Greipelís sprints where he was doing about 1350W from 90 to 100rpm.
But they're not as significant as what actually strong people can do elsewhere.

I'm nothing like Griepel, obviously. I've used an SRM, G3, P2max, and C1 powermeters, and have spent a considerable amount of time looking at that data. My peak power does not come anywhere near 100 rpm
rubiksoval is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:52 AM
  #65  
topflightpro
Senior Member
 
topflightpro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 5,952
Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1074 Post(s)
To go back to the OPs original question, the correct answer is: It depends.

Riding with a group can help push you to ride faster and farther - drafting has a major impact. If you are newer to riding, group rides are a great way to build fitness/strength/endurance or whatever you want to call it. (I'm ignoring the entire strength discussion here.)

Once you identify specific goals, interval training often is the best way to achieve that. Intervals are often best done solo - group rides will disrupt things. You will find that a lot of experience racers will do most of the riding solo for this reason. Some will still stop in to various group rides, often for the social aspect.

You mentioned getting a power meter. Power meters are great tools for measuring effort, but they are only a tool. If you are not following a specific training plan and using the power meter within that plan, the power meter itself will not help you get faster.
topflightpro is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:54 AM
  #66  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,011
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Voodoo76 View Post
I've seen that particular study, and get his conclusions. My n=1 however is at this point in time, I am seeing real benefit to a recent addition of some (1 session/wk) low gear and standing reps (6 to 10m on) and some Tempo at reduced (On a long ride I target 30m or so 75rpm vs self selected 90-95) leg speed. My 20K time has improved, and my comfort level pushing a gear in Aero position has improved. Prior to this change I would loose power late in TT's and at the same time see my HR dropping. I interpreted this as a leg fatigue limiter not a cardio (fitness) issue. That specifically has improved, even at a much lower CTL.

I'm not saying this is for everyone, but I've been training for 40+ years and have a pretty good sense for when something is working for myself. Never really incorporated this into my training in the past, so I'm no zealot.
Of course you are right. If you have two riders with equivalent aerobic capability, the stronger rider will win the TT for simple reason that with the same level of cardio capability the stronger rider can impart greater pedal force per pedal stroke and push a higher gear = more speed. Same cardio capability as the weaker rider. Stronger rider wins.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 06:56 AM
  #67  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 2,148

Bikes: Felt AR

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1241 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
When I do intervals on the bike and I come home and rest, I have an overall body burn and pump to my muscles. Muscle tissue is torn down. It is because muscle tissue is torn down, that intervals can't be done all day long and everyday. After rest, muscle fibers rebuild stronger. Body's gain strength by interval training. To say otherwise is silly. You conflate or rather obfuscate power and strength. A component of Power is strength. Power isn't just power..lol.
What you are talking about makes zero sense. Interval training is aerobic training. You're conflating it with something else entirely.
rubiksoval is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:00 AM
  #68  
kbarch 
Senior Member
 
kbarch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Tenafly, NJ
Posts: 4,284

Bikes: Casati Steel, Cinelli Fixed, Giant CX, Ridley SL

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1086 Post(s)
Originally Posted by asgelle View Post

Force is a requirement for sprinting. Strength is the maximum force or tension a muscle or muscle group can produce. Since even the shortest sprint requires multiple contractions, what matters is the force that can be maintained, not the maximum that can be produced.

And I donít know that road sprinters spend considerable time in the gym.
OK, I haven't gotten all the way through, but I've been chomping at the bit to put on my nerd glasses....
Actually, strength is a measure of forces that can be withstood before a system fails. It may be developed through training, but it is not something that a system "produces" It is something that static objects have.
I think it is clear by now that, in most forms of exercise, the limiting factor in performance is a body's ability to convert energy and transfer it efficiently in certain movements against certain resistances.
Metabolic, aerobic, cardio-vascular, and muscular function, along with form, are the things that most need to be looked after to improve performance. For most cycling activities, most peoples legs have more that enough strength to support whatever the bike might throw at them - at least in a structural sense. I think it is quite right to downplay the significance of "leg strength" but I don't think it should be ignored, as it does come into play now and then, on extreme pitches and sprints.
However, if we consider a broader or even metaphorical sense of strength - the ability of ones whole body system to not fail under pressure, it would seem that ALL training is about getting stronger.
kbarch is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:06 AM
  #69  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,011
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
Originally Posted by rubiksoval View Post
What you are talking about makes zero sense. Interval training is aerobic training. You're conflating it with something else entirely.
Well then we disagree about interval training not only increasing aerobic capability..we agree on that point...but you believe interval training does nothing to increase overall body strength. Latter is where we disagree. I gave the definition of Power. You can say that body strength has nothing to do propelling a bicycle and I would say to you, put any TdF winner up against a world class track sprinter and watch him lose in a track race. There is no amount of aerobic capacity that would allow a TdF winner to beat a world class track rider in a short race.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:13 AM
  #70  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,011
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
Originally Posted by kbarch View Post
OK, I haven't gotten all the way through, but I've been chomping at the bit to put on my nerd glasses....
Actually, strength is a measure of forces that can be withstood before a system fails. It may be developed through training, but it is not something that a system "produces" It is something that static objects have.
I think it is clear by now that, in most forms of exercise, the limiting factor in performance is a body's ability to convert energy and transfer it efficiently in certain movements against certain resistances.
Metabolic, aerobic, cardio-vascular, and muscular function, along with form, are the things that most need to be looked after to improve performance. For most cycling activities, most peoples legs have more that enough strength to support whatever the bike might throw at them - at least in a structural sense. I think it is quite right to downplay the significance of "leg strength" but I don't think it should be ignored, as it does come into play now and then, on extreme pitches and sprints.
However, if we consider a broader or even metaphorical sense of strength - the ability of ones whole body system to not fail under pressure, it would seem that ALL training is about getting stronger.
Ya think?....in bold. How may people here can't hit high 30 mph in a bicycle sprint and yet can average 22mph for 50 miles? Leg strength matters 'a lot' in a sprint. Ridiculous to say its all about cardio capability even with gears on a bicycle.

Let's take Rubiksoval as an example. Let's say Rubiksoval can crush rider A in a 50 mile race. Not even close. Rider A who weighs the same as Rubiksoval can't average the watts that Rubiksoval can for 50 miles. But, rider A can crush Rubiksoval in 'any' sprint. 500 yds out rider A goes by Rubiksoval like he is standing still. Rider A already has demonstrated he doesn't have the cardio fitness of Rubiksoval, so what does rider A have? He is physically stronger with respect to all the muscles necessary to propel a bicycle the fastest.

Last edited by Campag4life; 09-14-18 at 07:25 AM.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:15 AM
  #71  
DrIsotope 
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 5,214

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2495 Post(s)
All I know is, I ride solo almost exclusively, and this has enabled me to develop a pretty big aerobic capacity. My "average" ride is over 35 miles long, so I'm conditioned to push air out of the way for 2+ hours every day. Any time I get near a group, or have something to take a draft off of, I can move with basically no effort. Trust issues pretty much keep me out of fast pacelines, but I would still argue that 22mph solo is more difficult than 27mph in a paceline-- because I have to maintain that output for long periods of time.

Strength building? I have no idea. I'm faster now than when I started 3 years ago-- but that's faster on average. I seriously doubt my top speed or peak power has improved. I'm just better conditioned. In the beginning, 15.5mph for 90 minutes would have me off the bike for two days. Now it's 19mph all day long. If I had someone to draft off of, I could easily get my 5-hour century. Even though I would feel like it didn't count.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:26 AM
  #72  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 3,569
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Originally Posted by kbarch View Post
Actually, strength is a measure of forces that can be withstood before a system fails.
That may be a definition in civil or mechanical engineering, but it makes no sense in the context of exercise physiology.
asgelle is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:29 AM
  #73  
asgelle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 3,569
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 287 Post(s)
Originally Posted by kbarch View Post
However, if we consider a broader or even metaphorical sense of strength - the ability of ones whole body system to not fail under pressure, it would seem that ALL training is about getting stronger.
In other words, if we redefine strength to mean not to fail then the ability not to fail is all about strength. A nice tautology.
asgelle is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:34 AM
  #74  
Campag4life
Voice of the Industry
 
Campag4life's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12,011
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 850 Post(s)
Originally Posted by asgelle View Post

That may be a definition in civil or mechanical engineering, but it makes no sense in the context of exercise physiology.
No it does and strength can be measured but its difficult to measure because the muscles necessary to propel a bicycle are multi-variant and interactive. A strength test to propelling a bicycle the fastest can not be measure by a leg press or how many push ups or how much weight you can curl or bench press. It is overall body strength required to rotating the pedals on the bike. And yes, guys like you will equate Power purely to aerobic fitness and that would be wrong. It is the interaction of body strength and cardio capability that determines Power, not either or. That is why there is no substitute to the training on a bicycle to make a rider faster. No gym exercise can emulate this muscle stress. Your position on the subject in fact denies the very existence of the musculature of the human body...lol.

Last edited by Campag4life; 09-14-18 at 07:38 AM.
Campag4life is offline  
Old 09-14-18, 07:48 AM
  #75  
rubiksoval
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Music City, USA
Posts: 2,148

Bikes: Felt AR

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1241 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Campag4life View Post
Well then we disagree about interval training not only increasing aerobic capability..we agree on that point...but you believe interval training does nothing to increase overall body strength. Latter is where we disagree. I gave the definition of Power. You can say that body strength has nothing to do propelling a bicycle and I would say to you, put any TdF winner up against a world class track sprinter and watch him lose in a track race. There is no amount of aerobic capacity that would allow a TdF winner to beat a world class track rider in a short race.
So now you've reduced your entire argument to track sprinting?

And next we'll discuss why Usain Bolt can't win 5ks or marathons?

Why is it that the TDF rider can ride a 4k in 4 mins and 15 seconds, averaging 35 mph? Or that same TdF rider can ride a 3:50 4k team pursuit, hitting well above 40 mph in his pulls?

I mean, dude weighs 160 lbs or so. How is he going those speeds and for that duration?

Last edited by rubiksoval; 09-14-18 at 08:41 AM.
rubiksoval is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service