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Road bike Rear Rack...no eyelets

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Road bike Rear Rack...no eyelets

Old 09-14-18, 04:09 PM
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Road bike Rear Rack...no eyelets

Guys,
For bike framesets without threaded eyelets for fender and rack mounting, anybody here use the following Topeak rack?

https://www.topeak.com/us/en/product...90-roadie-rack

I have had good luck with Topeak racks on bikes with eyelets and wondered if this rack worked nicely for Topeak's sliding panniers bag on a road bike that doesn't have eyelet mounting capability? My sense is a pure seat post only mounted rack would be less secure and this rack maybe pretty solid as stabilized by seat stay attachment. What do you think?

Thanks for any experience...
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Old 09-14-18, 07:21 PM
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It looks like it should work just fine.

On a positive note I would like to congratulate the entire bicycle accessories industry for coming up with so many ugly kludgy solutions to the problem of the natural inclination of many cyclists to want to carry something on their bike rides and many bike manufacturers who cannot put two threaded holes on their rear dropouts. It's a hole for crissakes! What kind of performance hit do racer style bikes take when two damn holes are added?
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Old 09-14-18, 09:03 PM
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Here's the killer solution. Awesome rack especially for a racing geometry bike without eyelets. Capacity of 36lbs.

Half the weight of anything else out there.

https://www.tailfin.cc/products/t1-c...nier-bike-rack

Great stuff but pricey.

J.
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Old 09-15-18, 03:34 AM
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Road bike Rear Rack...no eyelets
Originally Posted by Campag4life
Guys,
For bike framesets without threaded eyelets for fender and rack mounting, anybody here use the following Topeak rack?

https://www.topeak.com/us/en/product...90-roadie-rack

I have had good luck with Topeak racks on bikes with eyelets and wondered if this rack worked nicely for Topeak's sliding panniers bag on a road bike that doesn't have eyelet mounting capability?

My sense is a pure seat post only mounted rack would be less secure and this rack maybe pretty solid as stabilized by seat stay attachment. What do you think?

Thanks for any experience...
See this thread on the General Cycling Discussion Forum,
Why do so few "endurance" bikes have rack mounts?"
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston
I use my carbon fiber endurance bike (Specialized S-Works) for commuting, and my best solution has been to use a seat mounted (not seatpost) Arkel 15 Liter Bikepack.

I have sufficient room to carry just about everything I need. I might add a lightweight backpack for bulky, but light items.
The seat stay-mount spares my carbon fiber seat post. A 9 liter model is also available.

I do like the Topeak rack and bag on my aluminum Diverge with eyelets.


Previously though, some other alternatives I found:
Originally Posted by Bandera
Dill Pickle Gear: Dill Pickle Gear

The owner, who is active on BF as "Coluber42", is an experienced Randonneur and produces quality kit.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston
I second that recommendation. I have visited her studio, and am planning to order a large saddlebag for my carbon fiber bike [without eyelets for a rack].
But before I bought a saddlebag, I discovered this product
Originally Posted by Jerrys88
Here is a copy of something I posted on another thread regarding the Green Guru Hauler Bike Pack:

I use one of these on my bike and really like it a lot. It has a stiff plastic insert on the bottom, so it's like a removable rack. It's expandable so it's only as long as it needs to be depending on how much stuff you have in it.

It comes with a shoulder strap, so when you reach your destination it can be worn as you would a messenger bag. When I don't need to carry lots of stuff, like when I go out for lunch, I can easily remove it from my bike so I'm left with a bike that has no added weight from an attached rack.[/FONT]

It's very durable and waterproof and I like that it's made entirely from recycled materials. Only downside is the straps that go through the saddle rails are short, so it takes some practice inserting them, but that's a minor complaint.

Also, it only has one outside "pouch" that is a decent size 2-dimensionally, but not 3 dimensionally, if you know what I mean (It's a flat pouch. I would have designed it to have more depth). I fit my smartphone and keys in it, and could probably stuff my wallet in it, but not much else. Not a huge problem - it's quick and easy to undo the side clasps and open the main bag while it's attached to the bike.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRNyL2xftbs
I used it for about a year, but the back of my thigh did strike the bag [and it sways, but otherwise was OK, and is seat stay-mounted (weight bearing), and just stabilized by the carbon fiber seatpost].



Last edited by Jim from Boston; 09-15-18 at 05:05 AM. Reason: added alternatives
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Old 09-15-18, 04:43 AM
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I think the issue with eyelets on CF bikes might be strength---CF is more brittle than steel and the loads would be coming from every direction and thus hard to brace for, and the tiny amount of CF around a bolt hole would be pretty vulnerable, I think.

I'd think a longer axle with vertical supports (as the Tailfin seems to use) would be the best solution for CF racks ... but then, where does the top of the rack mount? Same issue with drilling the tops of the seat stays---the uninterrupted tube is much stronger then a tube with holes and inserts, which would concentrate stress. Rack mounts off the modified seat collar look like the best bet there.

I wouldn't want anything attached to my CF seat post.
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Old 09-15-18, 05:39 AM
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Thanks a lot guys. Many great comments and options. Please keep the suggestions coming.
Wasn't aware the AL Diverge has eyelets. Thanks
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Old 09-15-18, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life
Thanks a lot guys. Many great comments and options. Please keep the suggestions coming.
Wasn't aware the AL Diverge has eyelets. Thanks
Mine does. In fact just this morning I recommended it as a fine year-round commuter on this General Cycling Discussion Forum, “
Best Commuter Bike for New England (for my tastes)?:
Originally Posted by Haramassive
…I'm currently in the market for a new commuter bike. I live in Boston and for the past few months I've been using my friend's commuter bike, basically a typical commuter road bike with fenders and drop bars.

It's nice and comfortable but I just can't bring myself to love the bike. I've decided that I'm going to, instead, give him his bike back and go into the market for a more race-oriented road bike.

I'll be looking at the used market and my budget is probably 5-700 dollars. I'd also like something with wider tire compatibility. At least 28 inch but 32 or even 35 would be incredible. I know this puts me in cyclocross territory, but I thought I'd see if there are any road bikes that have this setup.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston
I have ridden my bikes in Boston and Metro Detroit and they are suitable for both.

I have a carbon fiber road bike for commuting in the nice weather that's a joy to ride, but for the worst circumstances it's good to have a beater that accepts studded tires, fenders, and a rack for a bag, voluminous enough for your needs; and lights and a rearview mirror. I also like a computer to keep track of miles, cadence, etc.

My choice for a beater was initially a Cannondale F800 mountain bike I got used, and subsequently bought a Specialized Diverge road bike, with the accessories as above, about $1500. The Diverge has 30C tires [or maybe 28C], the narrowest available for studded tires.
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Old 09-15-18, 04:36 PM
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I don't have experience with these, but they seem to be the most stable design:

Road bike racks that mount via the quick release skewer and the brake bolt. Perhaps someone on BF has tried them.
Here's an example:
Axiom Streamliner rack.
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Old 09-15-18, 10:37 PM
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Originally Posted by rm -rf
I don't have experience with these, but they seem to be the most stable design:

Road bike racks that mount via the quick release skewer and the brake bolt. Perhaps someone on BF has tried them.
Here's an example:
Axiom Streamliner rack.
This is to me the most stable design as I have used these before, less than 20lb in the back (10lb on each side on ortlieb front roller bags (bag works for rear as well)). Carbon bike. It is a lot more stable over a large saddle bag.
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Old 09-16-18, 03:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Jim from Boston
Mine does. In fact just this morning I recommended it as a fine year-round commuter on this General Cycling Discussion Forum, “Best Commuter Bike for New England (for my tastes)?”:
Nice go anywhere rig. I am not a fan of the future shock on latest carbon models but Specialized still makes the Diverge without a FS in the lowest cost Al model.

Spesh redesigned the bike since your model year and dropped the seat stays down and I am not seeing any eyelets when I zoom into to the picture on their website...nor in the description.

FYI to those shopping the latest Diverge:
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...=239512-129178
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Old 09-16-18, 03:44 AM
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For no eyelet bikes, instead of using the rim brake caliper center stud mount...which of course disc brake bikes don't have, a seatpost clamp mount is pretty popular. Connect it from a seat post clamp with threaded eyelets to some Al straps to the front of the rack. Shown below:

https://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Alloy-Seat-Clamp-Mount/dp/B00X0JQ0A2/ref=pd_sbs_468_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00X0JQ0A2&pd_rd_r=07dd451b-b994-11e8-87eb-1be919d0e38f&pd_rd_w=ZQpnT&pd_rd_wg=58GRI&pf_rd_i=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=53dead45-2b3d-4b73-bafb-fe26a7f14aac&pf_rd_r=H4D7PXCVWSTTET2WPK6H&pf_rd_s=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_t=40701&refRID=H4D7PXCVWSTTET2WPK6H
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Old 09-16-18, 03:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs
I think the issue with eyelets on CF bikes might be strength---CF is more brittle than steel and the loads would be coming from every direction and thus hard to brace for, and the tiny amount of CF around a bolt hole would be pretty vulnerable, I think.

I'd think a longer axle with vertical supports (as the Tailfin seems to use) would be the best solution for CF racks ... but then, where does the top of the rack mount? Same issue with drilling the tops of the seat stays---the uninterrupted tube is much stronger then a tube with holes and inserts, which would concentrate stress. Rack mounts off the modified seat collar look like the best bet there.

I wouldn't want anything attached to my CF seat post.
Yes, the seatpost maybe get a bit scratched. A carbon seat post has pretty stout structural integrity because it has to support rider weight and of course decent compressive strength because it is held in place by pure compression i.e. seat tube clamp, but will share what I know about Al versus carbon seat posts. Based upon my experience, ride quality difference between Al and carbon posts is a myth. Plenty of Al posts out there with great flex and ride comfort. My personal preference is a Zipp two bolt Al setback post on a 'carbon bike'. The Zipp Al seatpost is also inexpensive. If it gets a little marred from mounting a rack I am going to keep on the bike a lot, I really don't care. My opinion of course.
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Old 09-16-18, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life
For no eyelet bikes, instead of using the rim brake caliper center stud mount...which of course disc brake bikes don't have, a seatpost clamp mount is pretty popular. Connect it from a seat post clamp with threaded eyelets to some Al straps to the front of the rack. Shown below:

https://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Alloy...CVWSTTET2WPK6H
I was going to mention, if you have a Specialized bike a lot of the full carbon models have the lower rack mounts (by where the tire connects) but not the top ones, and you can attach a rack by buying a different seatpost where the seatpost has rack mounts built in like you linked to above.

The lightest most fashionable looking rack I've seen is the bontrager backrack lightweight:
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/e...eight/p/08214/

The Axiom Streamliner is a cheaper rack designed for a bike without rack mounts, but I remember it look fine on one bike but terrible on another.
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Old 10-22-19, 10:50 AM
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So, a friend and I came with a solution on adding a rack into a 90s nishiki road bike
We made some adapters and just add them, I also added a wood shelf to move the panniers a little bit back since the frame is short and while riding you kept hitting the panniers.
This is a semi permanent setup, when I ride I try to enter places with my bike or just have everything I carry on a bag i can take in and out real quickly.
I saw some adapters online but where something around 50 euro plus shipping and this adapters where free since my friend had the material as a waste from his work.





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Old 10-22-19, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by MKahrl
It looks like it should work just fine.

On a positive note I would like to congratulate the entire bicycle accessories industry for coming up with so many ugly kludgy solutions to the problem of the natural inclination of many cyclists to want to carry something on their bike rides and many bike manufacturers who cannot put two threaded holes on their rear dropouts. It's a hole for crissakes! What kind of performance hit do racer style bikes take when two damn holes are added?
13 months later and these words still ring true. Why road bikes cant have eyelets is beyond me.

So many road bikes either have no eyelets for fenders or they have 'hidden' eyelets that can make for wonky mounting.
And if a frame cant support the possible weight of a rack, it should be explicitly stated in the literature both on the company's website and in the paperwork given to the owner at purchase. Not all stays are made to support rack weight, but that needs to be made clear.

Also, why so many cyclists continue to buy frames that require kludgy mounting of fenders and/or a rack is beyond me.

Chicken or the egg situation at this point.
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