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Endurace x Domane x Roubaix x Synapse

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Endurace x Domane x Roubaix x Synapse

Old 09-15-18, 10:12 PM
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Endurace x Domane x Roubaix x Synapse

Hi guys,

Have shortlisted Endurace, Domane, Roubaix, Synapse for my next bike. Currently riding a 2008 Allez, so expecting a big upgrade!

Hard to choose and will certainly ride them, but also considering other criteria and am hoping someone can share his/her experience on the following topics

- Comfort: would you say Roubaix's future shock is advantageous if I only ride on good roads?
- Customer Support: Since Canyon doesn't have retailers, I wonder if I would have trouble with maintenance
- Overall durability: wonder whether Roubaix's future shock and Domane's Isospeed are prone to breakdowns. (The Roubaix definitely felt flimsy to me.... )
- Overall riding experience: Any good or bad comments on the options above?

Should I be considering anything else? eg: BMC Roadmachine 02 two

Maybe this helps: I plan to spend up to USD3500 on my next bike, not considering electronic components, ride about 60-100 miles a week, 99% of the time on high quality roads.

Thanks in advance!

Last edited by werner; 09-16-18 at 04:12 AM.
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Old 09-16-18, 04:29 AM
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Will just give you my vote. Either the Domane or Synapse. I own an older Roubaix SL3 Pro with the good carbon. No new Roubaix for me with Future Shock. I don't like a pogo stick on the front end of my bike. If you need more compliance in front, buy a gravel bike version like the Domane and put 35c tires on it. Save yourself the headache of the future shock and any related maintenance.

The rub forgive the pun of all the bikes above is they all have disc brakes. Rim brake bikes with endurance geometry exist I would be happy to share. But first, you may be a better candidate for disc brakes. Depends on your size and riding environment.

So first, we need to know a bit more about you. What kind of roads to you ride? Are they bumpy or smooth? Do you do much climbing?
Do you ever ride with competitive riders like the A group? How old are you and how fit are you and how much do you weigh?

Riding environment and your size and fitness matters.

You don't have to spend a boatload of cash for an excellent road bike. It isn't that much about the bike and more about you. You need the right bike for your environment.

What size tires do you ride on your Allez? Amount of climbing and or riding in foul versus fair weather riding will determine how much you need disc brakes.
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Old 09-16-18, 04:51 AM
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In 2017, I purchased my Domane SL6 Disc. I am very happy with it. I am at 200lbs +/- 4%...depending on donut intake. I have about 2K miles on it, including a century, 6 100k, 2 50mi...my training rides are typically 21-33mi 2-3 times a week. The only thing I've changed is the seat (not unusual) and I replaced the tires with R3 Bontrager (32 size as delivered) before a couple of 100k's I planned to ride in TX this summer (tires are cheap when carrying 200lb in the heat). I need to take the bike to my LBS when the season slows to have the Isospeeds checked, but do not anticipate any issues. My biggest observation for you about riding the bike is that compared to many others it is quiet...riding over rough stuff there is very little or no chatter, creaking, etc that I hear from other bikes around me...and it soaks up most of it.

When I was looking at bikes, I rented a Roubaix Expert for a weekend and logged some miles on familiar roads. It is a nice bike and rides similarly (in my inexperienced opinion) although I seem to remember the front end feeling heavier---which may just have been the difference in the seat to bar aspects of the bikes.

Ultimately, I went with the Domane bc they had a great sale allowing me to get into a $4500 bike at $1000 off, and the Trek LBS was 30 miles closer. I have no experience with the other two bikes you listed. Ride all of them if you can. Happy hunting!
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Old 09-16-18, 06:01 AM
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I have two Domanes: 4.5 caliper and SLR7 Disc. They are superb bikes leaving me wanting for nothing for the type of riding I do: 100-200mile rides.

A comment however; a professional dynamic (Retul or equivalent) bike fitting will be a requisite if you are to achieve the max comfort on any frame. Budget several hundred dollars for this first step before you start racking up the miles on your new bike.

Best of luck
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Old 09-16-18, 06:18 AM
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Have a Domane SLR9 Disc. Just finished my first century in 40 years on it. Pure Joy.......
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Old 09-16-18, 06:57 AM
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Not to pile on to the Domane love, but I've had one for a few months and it's amazing. Hard to tell if it's the stock 32mm tires or Trek's "IsoSpeed" bump-dampening tech, but it's the fastest/smoothest ride I've ever enjoyed.
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Old 09-16-18, 07:47 AM
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Another Domane owner and another with no regrets.

Before considering a Domane, I wanted nothing to do with any kind of "shocks" on a road bike and I assumed the worst about the efficacy, trade-offs and durability of IsoSpeed. Seeing a very nicely spec'd Domane made me look in to IsoSpeed a little more and my opinion changed - mechanically, it's a very simple (they've added pivot points that allow flex along the length of the seatpost/seat tube [from saddle to BB junction] and the steerer [from stem to lower headset bearings]). I have seen complaints of clicking/noise when/if the bearings become fouled, but those complaints are relatively few, relatively minor and I'm not afraid of changing out and/or being able to source bearings in the future.

In practice, I think that IsoSpeed works really well. Yes, it's nice from the comfort standpoint, taking the brunt of the big jolts and turning down the buzz/chatter, but the thing that I immediately noticed was that the bike just felt much more planted - the road-holding is pretty awesome and confidence-inspiring. Equally impressive is that you don't really notice it otherwise - I was afraid of pedal stroke bounce, but you have to be trying really hard (very fast, very choppy strokes) to make that happen.
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Old 09-16-18, 07:50 AM
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As I am new to cycling, take my advice with a load of NaCl, but I was debating a similar set of options over the past couple of weeks. I visited bike shops, test road a few, and ended up going with the Domane. Like some have mentioned above, I didn't want to deal with potential maintenance issues with the Future Shock, and I wanted a little more compliance than the Synapse could provide, so the Domane won out. I was then promptly upsold and ended up buying an SL8 instead of the SL5 I was considering, but I figure it'll keep me from falling victim to bike lust later. Or, at least, that's what I told myself
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Old 09-16-18, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi
Another Domane owner and another with no regrets.

Before considering a Domane, I wanted nothing to do with any kind of "shocks" on a road bike and I assumed the worst about the efficacy, trade-offs and durability of IsoSpeed. Seeing a very nicely spec'd Domane made me look in to IsoSpeed a little more and my opinion changed - mechanically, it's a very simple (they've added pivot points that allow flex along the length of the seatpost/seat tube [from saddle to BB junction] and the steerer [from stem to lower headset bearings]). I have seen complaints of clicking/noise when/if the bearings become fouled, but those complaints are relatively few, relatively minor and I'm not afraid of changing out and/or being able to source bearings in the future.

In practice, I think that IsoSpeed works really well. Yes, it's nice from the comfort standpoint, taking the brunt of the big jolts and turning down the buzz/chatter, but the thing that I immediately noticed was that the bike just felt much more planted - the road-holding is pretty awesome and confidence-inspiring. Equally impressive is that you don't really notice it otherwise - I was afraid of pedal stroke bounce, but you have to be trying really hard (very fast, very choppy strokes) to make that happen.
Seems like praise for the Domane is pretty universal. Like you, I tend to view things like isospeed with a dose of skepticism but there have been too many reports to the contrary...and...as important...it doesn't seem to break in spite of having in effect a pivot built into the head tube.
Have to give Trek props for improving comfort on a road bike...without the downside of too much complexity and cost...and...at any detriment to reliability. Well done Trek.

All said, for the roads I ride which tend to be smooth-ish, the Emonda would get my nod. But there is likely very little if any between the bikes in speed and over the rough stuff the Domane would win because it protects its rider more.
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Old 09-16-18, 08:16 AM
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Welcome to the forum. If you end up with any of those bikes, you'll have a good one!
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Old 09-16-18, 11:29 AM
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I have Domane SL6 disc 2018 and I love it, fast and light bike!
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Old 09-16-18, 11:38 AM
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In fear of doing the Ďwhat about /MY/ bikeí thing ó Iím amazingly impressed with my recently acquired Bianchi Infinito CV. The 2019 looks like itlíll have bigger tyre clearance, bigger BB and the more standard rear hub spacing. Worth a look; Iím on 25mm tyres and ithe thing is smooth and /fast/ compared to anything else I have ridden.
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Old 09-16-18, 03:41 PM
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All four bikes you mention are very, very capable machines. Really, you can't go wrong with any of them. The only thing that scares me about the Canyon is the lack of LBS support. If that's unimportant to you then it's tough to beat the value. I had a similar dilemma and ended up with the Synapse and am very, very happy with it. One thing to consider is the shop you are buying from. All things equal, I'll almost always go with the LBS that offers better service and makes me feel more comfortable. If I'm dropping $6000 on a bike I want to know that the shop will have my back if something goes wrong. In the end that's why I chose the Cannondale over the Trek or Specialized - the shop was superior to the others. I have no doubt I would be equally happy with any of those four bikes.
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Old 09-16-18, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by RushFan2112
All four bikes you mention are very, very capable machines. Really, you can't go wrong with any of them. The only thing that scares me about the Canyon is the lack of LBS support. If that's unimportant to you then it's tough to beat the value. I had a similar dilemma and ended up with the Synapse and am very, very happy with it. One thing to consider is the shop you are buying from. All things equal, I'll almost always go with the LBS that offers better service and makes me feel more comfortable. If I'm dropping $6000 on a bike I want to know that the shop will have my back if something goes wrong. In the end that's why I chose the Cannondale over the Trek or Specialized - the shop was superior to the others. I have no doubt I would be equally happy with any of those four bikes.
Why is LBS an issue?
Around here the various shops will service any brand of bike regardless of whether it is one they have an agency for or not.
Why wouldn't they?
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Old 09-16-18, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Dean V
Why is LBS an issue?
Around here the various shops will service any brand of bike regardless of whether it is one they have an agency for or not.
Why wouldn't they?
Warranty.
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Old 09-16-18, 04:57 PM
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Just to add on, I've own/owned 3 bikes with the isospeed. Probably a total of 30k miles. It works without issue. Now you said you ride on high quality roads so maybe it isn't as important to you as it is to others.
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Old 09-16-18, 05:19 PM
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2018 Roubaix Expert owner here. Have ridden it about 1500 mile including a century. Future Shock has not been a problem at all. The ride is quite nice. The bike does have a "noise" that I can't pin done though I think it's from a cage mount and certainly not the front shock. I did switch out the handle bars and am not keen on the color pattern.
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Old 09-16-18, 05:57 PM
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2017 Roubaix, love it no problems..Streets I ride rival Afghanistan with no IED's. So much better than my Cr1. Some people on this board hate the bike and will bash it no matter what - with out ever riding it. Ride all and decide. All are good
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Old 09-16-18, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Campag4life
Will just give you my vote. Either the Domane or Synapse. I own an older Roubaix SL3 Pro with the good carbon. No new Roubaix for me with Future Shock. I don't like a pogo stick on the front end of my bike. If you need more compliance in front, buy a gravel bike version like the Domane and put 35c tires on it. Save yourself the headache of the future shock and any related maintenance.

The rub forgive the pun of all the bikes above is they all have disc brakes. Rim brake bikes with endurance geometry exist I would be happy to share. But first, you may be a better candidate for disc brakes. Depends on your size and riding environment.

So first, we need to know a bit more about you. What kind of roads to you ride? Are they bumpy or smooth? Do you do much climbing?
Do you ever ride with competitive riders like the A group? How old are you and how fit are you and how much do you weigh?

Riding environment and your size and fitness matters.

You don't have to spend a boatload of cash for an excellent road bike. It isn't that much about the bike and more about you. You need the right bike for your environment.

What size tires do you ride on your Allez? Amount of climbing and or riding in foul versus fair weather riding will determine how much you need disc brakes.
Hey, thanks for the detailed answer and follow up questions.

I only ride very good roads and I live in Singapore which means no climbs at all. The only hills are man made :-)

My fitness is improving fast, but am overweight: 225lbs, 6.0Ē, 39yo.

I usually ride on my own, donít think I can keep up with groups.

My Allez has 28mm tires. Actually quite nice, but rode a Domane SL6 w rim brakes yesterday and it was like moving from economy to business class... completely different thing... Am considering that one now (figure rim brakes are not a deal breaker) and put some additional money into good pedals, new carbon shoes bike fitting and save some cash for a potential need of new saddle, etc, rather than going for an SLR

Or should input money into SLR?

Cheers!

Werner
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Old 09-16-18, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by werner


Hey, thanks for the detailed answer and follow up questions.

I only ride very good roads and I live in Singapore which means no climbs at all. The only hills are man made :-)

My fitness is improving fast, but am overweight: 225lbs, 6.0Ē, 39yo.

I usually ride on my own, donít think I can keep up with groups.

My Allez has 28mm tires. Actually quite nice, but rode a Domane SL6 w rim brakes yesterday and it was like moving from economy to business class... completely different thing... Am considering that one now (figure rim brakes are not a deal breaker) and put some additional money into good pedals, new carbon shoes bike fitting and save some cash for a potential need of new saddle, etc, rather than going for an SLR

Or should input money into SLR?

Cheers!

Werner
u do laps on mt. faber bro?

small world
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Old 09-16-18, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by expatbrit
In fear of doing the Ďwhat about /MY/ bikeí thing ó Iím amazingly impressed with my recently acquired Bianchi Infinito CV. The 2019 looks like itlíll have bigger tyre clearance, bigger BB and the more standard rear hub spacing. Worth a look; Iím on 25mm tyres and ithe thing is smooth and /fast/ compared to anything else I have ridden.
Hi,

i have had a look at the Infinito CV. Feels like a great bike and pretty too. The issue with it is the slightly higher price point compared to the Domane SL6. Not sure if totally comparable, glad to hear more about it if you can share.

Cheers!
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Old 09-16-18, 07:56 PM
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I was in your boat last year. I test rode the Domane, Roubaix, and Synapse. I ended up getting the Synapse because to me it felt more lively. The Domane felt like very comfy ride. The Roubaix was nice too, but I was like many others here with concern about Future Shock holding up. I ended up getting a great deal on the Synapse and have put 2k+ miles on it since May and haven't had any problems. It's my first road bike and I love it.
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Old 09-16-18, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by wayne310
u do laps on mt. faber bro?

small world
sometimes, but a bit boring going there every weekend :-) not a very long climb either. I go along PCN quite a bit. Want to do a "Giro de Singapura" soon... apparently 180km... so full day ride. but need a proper bike for that.

Found a decent deal at a Domane SL6 w rim brakes. Leaning towards that one. looks very nice.

Cheers
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Old 09-16-18, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by SkepticalOne
I have two Domanes: 4.5 caliper and SLR7 Disc. They are superb bikes leaving me wanting for nothing for the type of riding I do: 100-200mile rides.

A comment however; a professional dynamic (Retul or equivalent) bike fitting will be a requisite if you are to achieve the max comfort on any frame. Budget several hundred dollars for this first step before you start racking up the miles on your new bike.

Best of luck
Yeah, bike fit has been budgeted... thinking of investing about 3000 on bike and the other 500 in fitting, new shoes, better pedals. That would leave me with a Domane SL 6 rim brakes, ultegra pedals, carbon sole shoes.

Or is the SLR such a superior choice? (adds about 1000 to the price tag.. sounds steep)
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Old 09-17-18, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by werner


Hi,

i have had a look at the Infinito CV. Feels like a great bike and pretty too. The issue with it is the slightly higher price point compared to the Domane SL6. Not sure if totally comparable, glad to hear more about it if you can share.

Cheers!
i think I paid a fair bit for the paint .

To to be honest, it is more money for what you get, but there was an element of passion to it. I didnít do a lot of test riding (I was on crutches and non-weightbearing when I ordered it after a bike vs car displaced acetabilar fracture) but have previously ridden older generation Roubaix, Synapse, and Domane in 2013 or so. Memory says they werenít as snappy as the Infinito feels; I was frankly shocked when I got on it and pedaled and in a really good way. Iím very happy with my choice, and itís both pretty and a bit rare ó but Iím not going back and riding other just in case.

(mind you. Few places stock frames my size anyway, so Iím fairly safe ó the CV is a 63cm and had to be brought in specially)
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