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Failed Experiment

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Failed Experiment

Old 10-04-18, 08:47 PM
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colnago62
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Failed Experiment

When I bought my Madone, I wasnít able to get the cockpit setup I wanted; no 44cm bar and 13cm stem was available. So I went with the 44/12 bar. When I bought a Domane I had a 13cm Thomson stem put on. What a difference in comfort. I felt my breathing was better and I was more comfortable in the drops. A few years ago, Trek started making a kit for riders who wanted a different cockpit than the 1 piece bars. I made the switch and I am initially happy. We will see if I still feel that way in a month.

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Old 10-05-18, 01:14 AM
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Well it looks nice and all, but seems to be Enve equipment not Thompson or Bontrager. But what part of this is a ďfailed experimentĒ, sounds like itís working for you?
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Old 10-05-18, 01:43 AM
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Dean V
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Could you of gone up one frame size or would that of made the bars too high even with the stem slammed?
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Old 10-05-18, 03:56 AM
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I am wrestling with a similar issue, trying to get my Synapse set up similarly to my Ď92 Merckx Century. I know the Synapse is supposed to be more on the endurance side, but that should not preclude me from getting the reach / drop to where I want it. I have tried two stems but still feel cramped up on the drops, particularly if I want to get more aero. One nice thing about the new stems is being able to swap them out so easily.
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Old 10-05-18, 07:26 AM
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seau grateau
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Integrated bar/stems are some of the worst bike tech going around these days. I really hope they go out of style and don't trickle down into the affordable bike market.
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Old 10-05-18, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by seau grateau
Integrated bar/stems are some of the worst bike tech going around these days. I really hope they go out of style and don't trickle down into the affordable bike market.
True that, talk about limiting!

I went with mine purely because the bike was custom built for me so reach/drop was factored in, and I really wanted the full Speedvagen paint of bars and stem (Integrated) vs just the painted to match stem. Had it not been for that I never would go with an integrated combo.
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Old 10-05-18, 03:04 PM
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colnago62
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I tend to ride 59-60cm road frames. That frame is a 60cm the next size, I think, is a 62cm. which is way too large.
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Old 10-05-18, 03:55 PM
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Your post makes no sense really. Sorry. Are you really comparing a Domane to a Madone in geometry?...by changing stem size? A Domane has a higher stack and shorter top tube unless you changed frame sizes which makes your stem length point irrelevant.

I would never buy a bike with integrated handlebar/stem. Big cash cow for manufacturers and consumers get screwed and for what? 2 watts at 30mph?

You can always put a regular cockpit with conventional stem on a Madone as well.
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Old 10-05-18, 07:39 PM
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I have a Project one Domane which gives you the choice of H1 frame. So both my Madone and Domane are H1. The pictures are of my Madone with Enve bars.
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Old 10-05-18, 10:01 PM
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Originally Posted by colnago62
I have a Project one Domane which gives you the choice of H1 frame. So both my Madone and Domane are H1. The pictures are of my Madone with Enve bars.
understood I guess Iím wondering what the question is or what the failed experiment is? Iíd love to be helpful....
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Old 10-06-18, 12:01 AM
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I guess I didnít explain the failed part very well. When Trek built its Madone 9, they originally used a one piece stem and bar that was proprietary and then had very limited selection of bar/stem combination. The new Madone has a separate stem and bar so it is easier to get the best setup for the individual. Proprietary one piece was the failure. It would have been better if Trek had just used a component already on the market like the Pro bar/stem and rebranded like they did with the TRP brakes.
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Old 10-06-18, 03:54 AM
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Originally Posted by colnago62
I guess I didn’t explain the failed part very well. When Trek built its Madone 9, they originally used a one piece stem and bar that was proprietary and then had very limited selection of bar/stem combination. The new Madone has a separate stem and bar so it is easier to get the best setup for the individual. Proprietary one piece was the failure. It would have been better if Trek had just used a component already on the market like the Pro bar/stem and rebranded like they did with the TRP brakes.
Makes a bit more sense. Yes, most here would agree that integrated stem/bar is a $500 failure at the amateur level. Pro's are a bit more refined in their fit and of course money is no object. No problem riding a $15K bike. Some amateurs in fact start out riding a shorter stem in the beginning of the season.
The whole integrated bar/stem is a manufacturing hustle. Trek was likely losing sales on the Madone for this inflexible design and why they changed it a more conventional cockpit.

They also offer a couple of options. The bike more reasonably priced at just over $4K, they install a conventional stem thankfully. Cables are routed adjacent to but not through the stem. All cables still route through the frame including the steerer. There is virtually less than a handful of watts lost with this cable routing approach and its nice and tidy compared to conventional bikes even with internal cable routing where the cables are exposed between handlebar and frame.

The Madone is one of my favorite aero bikes even though routing cables through the frame are a PITA but certainly doable for the decent home mechanic with patience. Only way to order the bike is with Di2 or Etap IMO. Di2 would get the nod in my case...my preference. Easier to route electrical cable through the frame than conventional groupset cables.

Trek did a great job on the Madone...beautiful, slippery and compliant with H2geometry available that won't break a rider's back or neck or for those long of inseam compared to torso length.
Also, wonderfully, they smelled coffee on their aero seat mast and finally incorporated a 2 bolt saddle clamp. When hemmed into a corner of only being able to use a proprietary seat mast, great to have the 2 bolt design which is so much better. They should do this for all their road bikes.

Last edited by Campag4life; 10-06-18 at 04:02 AM.
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