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Trek Rear IsoSpeed experiences

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Trek Rear IsoSpeed experiences

Old 12-21-18, 11:51 PM
  #51  
colnago62
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I used to have a 6 series Madone that I used as my winter/rain bike. The Madone 9 that I ride the rest of the time has ISO speed. The first few rides in the fall were painful after riding the 9 all summer. I would get surprised by bumps that would get soaked up on the 9 until I got used to remembering to rise off the seat.
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Old 12-22-18, 06:13 AM
  #52  
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Domane SL6 Disc...perfectly good, and I weigh 200lbs +/- a donut.
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Old 12-24-18, 04:29 AM
  #53  
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Domane 600 series frame, non-adjustable ISO - I have abut 25,000 miles on it, no complaints with hard efforts or any service needed on it. I weigh about 180 lbs.
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Old 12-24-18, 01:54 PM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by cb400bill View Post
Thread reopened. Campag4life please remain out of this thread.
I applaud your efforts to keep your forum decent place to visit. Thank you.
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Old 12-26-18, 08:45 PM
  #55  
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I ride a Domane 5.2 (2014). If that Isospeed thing does something, I can't tell. My previous bike was an aluminum Orbea with carbon fork, seatpost, seatstays. When I first got the Domane, I felt that I was a bit less fatigued from the ride (road vibration?) but it was very subtle and I was comparing apples to oranges because the Domane was also full carbon. The geometry of the Domane felt better for me than the Madone, and the Emonda wasn't out at the time I bought my bike.

Tire size will trump any suspension mods added to road bikes, IMO.

I ride my Domane on gravel roads all the time. Usually just to get from one paved road to another but I have hit stretches of 2-3 miles and some wider tires would have been greatly appreciated.

I have Schwalbe tubeless tires that are listed 700 x 25 but measure 28. If the OP is riding a lot of gravel roads or rough roads, the Checkpoint will be a great choice because it can handle wider tires; with the Isospeed maybe being a bonus but certainly not something to worry about.
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Old 12-26-18, 08:58 PM
  #56  
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Originally Posted by bbattle View Post
Tire size will trump any suspension mods added to road bikes, IMO.
I would have expected the same, but my experience says otherwise. Bumps on my gravel bike (38mm tires @ 35-40psi) are much more jarring than on my Domane (30mm @65-70psi).
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Old 12-28-18, 08:03 AM
  #57  
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2017 Domane SL6, have about 5,000 miles on Isospeed front/rear, I weight 230lbs and run 32 mm tires at 80 psi.

Definitely smoother on typical real world roads, no noticeable bounce or negative effects. I don't have the adjustable rear but with the standard version when I hit potholes they still feel like potholes - the amount of travel is great for rough road buzz but not that much difference to me on bigger impacts. Still a major plus for me.
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Old 12-29-18, 11:17 PM
  #58  
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I've put about 1,000 miles on my new Domane ALR 5 Disc, which has the non-adjustable version of the IsoSpeed and. 700cx32 tires.

I've noticed nothing negative and the ride is more comfortable than my Trek DS 8.3 (hybrid with 700cx37 tires and a suspension fork).

Whether the IsoSpeed is responsible for all of the ride comfort, I couldn't say, but it sure seems like it's working as Trek intended.
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Old 01-22-19, 06:37 PM
  #59  
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Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
I have a large network of "rails to trails" crushed limestone bike trails running through the center of my town, and am getting tired of nearly getting picked off by inattentive drivers on the roads, so I have been looking at "gravel bikes" or endurance/touring bikes with greater clearance to make greater use of the trail system. I do notice that the vibration from gravel trails affects my hands and wrists as I get older, so the IsoSpeed decoupler is something I am interested in (and this is coming from a guy who used to race hard-tail mountain bikes in the '90's). I thought dialing in the bike fit would fix the issue, but it hasn't.

I recently tested a Checkpoint at a local bike shop. I am about 195 lbs these days, and really powered in to some sprints, but didn't notice any undesirable flex. To be honest, I didn't notice the IsoSpeed decoupler at all. If it does anything at all, it is very subtle. But I was only able to try it on some paved roadways and a mildly sloping hill, so perhaps the effects are more pronounced on bumpier terrain. My main criticism is that the bike is a bit heavy for full carbon. But the Checkpoint still appeals to me since I have found 35's or 38's to be optimal tire widths on our crushed limestone paths, and I could have a second wheelset with 28's on it for road rides. And it's hard to nitpick a couple pounds of bike when I could stand to lose 15 pounds off my body.

It seems to me that the only advantage of the Checkpoint over the Domane is greater tire clearance. Trek had a "Domane Gravel" a year or two ago, and it was panned for lacking clearance for larger tires. But with the Domane, you get the front IsoSpeed and have a few more options.
I had the same issue with vibration in my arms and hands too. I test-rode the Domane and Roubaix and ended up getting the Roubaix; you might want to check it out too. Personally, I thought the FutureShock worked a lot better for reducing vibration in the handlebars than the Domane's front IsoSpeed, but different people have different preferences. I also somehow felt like the Domane was just slower; not sure why.

The other big advantage of the Checkpoint over the Domane, IIRC, is that the Checkpoint has a bunch of mounts on it for a rear rack, extra water bottle cages, etc., that the Domane does not have, so you can take it bike-camping if you want. But it's a heavier bike than the Domane.

I like to ride on crushed-gravel trails too, and I've found the 28mm tires (actually 30mm when I measure them with my calipers) on my Roubaix seem to be sufficient.

And a big thank-you to our moderator for banning Campag4life from this thread. Honestly, I'm really sick of that guy butting into every single thread about endurance bikes, and blathering on endlessly telling everyone how we don't need them, when he doesn't even have one of these bikes and has probably never ridden one. I wish they'd just ban him from the whole board if he can't shut up about how much he hates "gimmicks" (i.e., new technology). It's not a one-time outburst with him, it's constant; I've been watching him do this endlessly ever since I joined this board. It's really made it so I don't even want to read stuff here because I'm so sick of him bashing stuff with long message after long message about stuff he hates.
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Old 01-23-19, 09:50 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by dwolsten View Post
I like to ride on crushed-gravel trails too, and I've found the 28mm tires (actually 30mm when I measure them with my calipers) on my Roubaix seem to be sufficient.
Ive managed on 28s, but recently switched a bike from 35s to 38s, and found the larger tire to be an improvement. For reference, Im primarily riding the Illinois Prairie Path and Great Western Trail, and in all sorts of conditions. There are sandy patches and occasional debris. And often puddles and mud after rainy periods.
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Old 01-27-19, 10:29 AM
  #61  
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I remember the Trek Pilot had a rear suspension, at least on some models. It was a rubber puck between the seatstays and seat tube. It didn't last very long but now Pinarello has resurrected the idea with one of their bikes. Perhaps the technology has improved enough to make the implementation of a road bike suspension useful. If not for pro racers, then the ordinary riding public.

Mavic's Zap derailleur was ahead of its time but now everyone is making electronic shifters.

Only time will tell.
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Old 01-27-19, 11:02 AM
  #62  
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Originally Posted by bbattle View Post
Perhaps the technology has improved enough to make the implementation of a road bike suspension useful. If not for pro racers, then the ordinary riding public.
Particularly on the cobbles, Trek riders have running IsoSpeed frames for years. Cancellara, in particular, was the first big name and his feedback is credited as being a significant part of the development of the system.
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Old 02-04-19, 09:13 AM
  #63  
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So.... looks like I need to replace my backup road bike / gravel frame now that my Crockett frame cracked. Debating between the ALR and SL Checkpoint frames - one has the bendy rear, the other does not. What's the feeling - Is the Iso rear worth it for 38c-ish tires @ 40psi? for 28c tires at 85psi?


Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post


I’ve managed on 28’s, but recently switched a bike from 35’s to 38’s, and found the larger tire to be an improvement. For reference, I’m primarily riding the Illinois Prairie Path and Great Western Trail, and in all sorts of conditions. There are sandy patches and occasional debris. And often puddles and mud after rainy periods.
On the Prairie path, Western Trail, and DesPlaines Trail - I've tried 23c through 43c tires. Every time I've gone wider and lower pressure, Strava noticed I've gone significantly faster. For example, going from 35c 120tpi Clement USHs @ 55psi to 43c Gravel Kings @38psi-ish i'd drop a full minute on 7min long Strava segment after segment. Being able to float on deformable surfaces makes a big difference.
I didn't get any faster. Obviously, 23c didn't work, but you can get pretty far on 28s - you just won't go fast. I a ride in Michigan last year on dirt roads. There were folks on 28c thru fat bikes. The fat bikes would obviously fall behind on the harder surfaces, but as soon as any grit was on the surface, the 28c tired guys would fly backward in the pack. When we'd hit a bit of sand suddenly, it was scary how quickly the 28c tired guys in front would slow and the fat tire bike behind would close in on everyone.

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Old 02-04-19, 10:36 AM
  #64  
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Originally Posted by jfranci3 View Post
So.... looks like I need to replace my backup road bike / gravel frame now that my Crockett frame cracked. Debating between the ALR and SL Checkpoint frames - one has the bendy rear, the other does not. What's the feeling - Is the Iso rear worth it for 38c-ish tires @ 40psi? for 28c tires at 85psi?




On the Prairie path, Western Trail, and DesPlaines Trail - I've tried 23c through 43c tires. Every time I've gone wider and lower pressure, Strava noticed I've gone significantly faster. For example, going from 35c 120tpi Clement USHs @ 55psi to 43c Gravel Kings @38psi-ish i'd drop a full minute on 7min long Strava segment after segment. Being able to float on deformable surfaces makes a big difference.
I didn't get any faster. Obviously, 23c didn't work, but you can get pretty far on 28s - you just won't go fast. I a ride in Michigan last year on dirt roads. There were folks on 28c thru fat bikes. The fat bikes would obviously fall behind on the harder surfaces, but as soon as any grit was on the surface, the 28c tired guys would fly backward in the pack. When we'd hit a bit of sand suddenly, it was scary how quickly the 28c tired guys in front would slow and the fat tire bike behind would close in on everyone.
I'm currently running Challenge Gravel Grinders at 38c width, and have really been liking this tire on the Prairie Path and Great Western Trail. I have been running higher pressure after some pinch flats on my old 35c tires, so I am hesitant to get below 60 psi. There are parts of these trails that are like pavement when they are dry, but as you get further out west from Glen Ellyn (where I am starting), you will find more sandy patches and looser fill. And I go out in all types of trail conditions (though not this time of year--I'm not crazy). I'm willing to try wider tires yet, but so far the Challenge tires have been great.

I am also considering the same frame options as you. I like building a bike up myself, but it seems difficult to find hydraulic disc brake groupsets at a good price. But I'm probably a few years off from this decision, as I have been upgrading my current stable of bikes this off season.
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Old 02-04-19, 11:20 AM
  #65  
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Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
I'm currently running Challenge Gravel Grinders at 38c width, and have really been liking this tire on the Prairie Path and Great Western Trail. I have been running higher pressure after some pinch flats on my old 35c tires, so I am hesitant to get below 60 psi. There are parts of these trails that are like pavement when they are dry, but as you get further out west from Glen Ellyn (where I am starting), you will find more sandy patches and looser fill. And I go out in all types of trail conditions (though not this time of year--I'm not crazy). I'm willing to try wider tires yet, but so far the Challenge tires have been great.

I am also considering the same frame options as you. I like building a bike up myself, but it seems difficult to find hydraulic disc brake groupsets at a good price. But I'm probably a few years off from this decision, as I have been upgrading my current stable of bikes this off season.
Go tubeless. End this pinchflat drama.

Finding full hydro is more expensive now that Shimano cleaned up their distribution. Merlin has had the best prices. Cable actuated hydro is just as good, but the calipers are larger. You can save some money here.
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Old 02-04-19, 01:20 PM
  #66  
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Originally Posted by jfranci3 View Post
Finding full hydro is more expensive now that Shimano cleaned up their distribution. Merlin has had the best prices. Cable actuated hydro is just as good, but the calipers are larger. You can save some money here.
How did Shimano change their distribution, and what were the effects? I have noticed fewer full group sets available this year from various retailers, and figured it must be seasonal. But maybe not?

Yes, tubeless is likely in my future for gravel riding. But I will not get a new wheelset until I get a new bike.
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Old 02-04-19, 01:31 PM
  #67  
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Originally Posted by HarborBandS View Post
How did Shimano change their distribution, and what were the effects? I have noticed fewer full group sets available this year from various retailers, and figured it must be seasonal. But maybe not?

Yes, tubeless is likely in my future for gravel riding. But I will not get a new wheelset until I get a new bike.
As I understand it there was some loophole that allowed online sellers to buy/sell you OEM parts at much cheaper prices if they were an OEM bike maker. As a result, all these global bike stores started selling their own line of bikes so they could sell OEM Shimano groupsets for 1/2 the price. Shimano is just getting this under control, so buy what you want now. Look up "Shimano grey market'

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/chain-...a-no-sell.html
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Old 02-04-19, 01:39 PM
  #68  
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Originally Posted by jfranci3 View Post
As I understand it there was some loophole that allowed online sellers to buy/sell you OEM parts at much cheaper prices if they were an OEM bike maker. As a result, all these global bike stores started selling their own line of bikes so they could sell OEM Shimano groupsets for 1/2 the price. Shimano is just getting this under control, so buy what you want now. Look up "Shimano grey market'

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/chain-...a-no-sell.html
Shoot. Those deals on Shimano groupsets through CRC, Wiggle, and the like were the only way I was able to make the economics of building up a frameset work out. It was still a bit more than buying a complete bike, but when you factored in all of the customization that was required after a complete bike purchase, it wasn't so bad.
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Old 02-04-19, 01:56 PM
  #69  
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Yeah, you'll either have to buy them on a bike, then sell the base bike, OR buy them from a re-reseller on ebay. I can see R7000 20cm bikes becoming popular.

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