Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Are Carbon Wheelset Generally Stronger than Aluminum Wheelset?

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Are Carbon Wheelset Generally Stronger than Aluminum Wheelset?

Old 04-19-19, 02:22 PM
  #26  
tyrion
Senior Member
 
tyrion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: San Diego, California
Posts: 2,299

Bikes: Breezer Radar

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1212 Post(s)
Liked 76 Times in 51 Posts
Originally Posted by MoAlpha View Post
Crits on a brakeless "fixie?" Do tell.
https://www.redbull.com/gb-en/red-hook-crit
tyrion is online now  
Old 04-19-19, 02:31 PM
  #27  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,858

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 298 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8893 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 85 Posts
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Lots of misinformation in this thread.

I'm pretty sure that half of what's been written here is simply made up.


-Tim-
Yeah, but which half?!
WhyFi is offline  
Old 04-19-19, 03:34 PM
  #28  
MoAlpha
• —
 
MoAlpha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 2,392

Bikes: Occasionally

Mentioned: 29 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1349 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
Thanks. Interesting. Completely out of it.
MoAlpha is online now  
Old 04-19-19, 03:47 PM
  #29  
aclinjury
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 142
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 113 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
carbon rims can be stronger than alu rims, provided the carbon rims are not made light, which unfortunately is what many carbon road rims go for, lightweight. Lightweight carbon rims definitely are more fragile than your typical alu rims.
But there are also heavy duty carbon rims made for mtb use that are stronger than alu rims, but in the roadie world, a heavy carbon rim just ain't gonna sell
aclinjury is offline  
Old 04-19-19, 03:50 PM
  #30  
colnago62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,394
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 255 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti View Post
Was anyone even commercially selling carbon fiber wheels 20 years ago, beyond maybe alloy-rim w/CF-fairing wheels? The choice dichotomy you propose isn't really a choice IIRC.

And TBH...20 year old alloy rims, weren't that great anyway, your choice basically being the Mavic rims that didn't (yet) have the spokes pull through the rim.
Carbon Wheels have been around a long time. Remember Spinnergys, the Specialized Tri spokes?
colnago62 is offline  
Old 04-19-19, 06:19 PM
  #31  
cycledogg
Senior Member
 
cycledogg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: Cannondale CAAD4, CAAD5, CAAD7 (Optimo), '07 SystemSix, '08 Trek TTX 9.0, 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo - ZIPP

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 323 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Marcus_Ti View Post
Was anyone even commercially selling carbon fiber wheels 20 years ago, beyond maybe alloy-rim w/CF-fairing wheels? The choice dichotomy you propose isn't really a choice IIRC.

And TBH...20 year old alloy rims, weren't that great anyway, your choice basically being the Mavic rims that didn't (yet) have the spokes pull through the rim.
I have a set of Mavic Open Pro CD and Mavic MA2 wheels, both laced to Shimano Ultegra hubs, both doing well. Hand built in the late 90's. As just mentioned, Spinergy Rev-X wheels were the cutting edge (no pun intended) back in the 90's. IIRC Now, if you want to bump up the years some, again, which would you rather buy, a used set of 10 year old carbon wheels or a used set of 10 year old alloy wheels. I would still get the alloy. JMHO
cycledogg is offline  
Old 04-19-19, 07:48 PM
  #32  
downhillmaster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 668
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 394 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 65 Times in 40 Posts
Originally Posted by TimothyH View Post
Lots of misinformation in this thread.

I'm pretty sure that half of what's been written here is simply made up.


-Tim-
What makes that different than any other BF thread?
A&S is 88% made up.
downhillmaster is offline  
Old 04-19-19, 09:46 PM
  #33  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 19,083
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7991 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 127 Posts
Originally Posted by cycledogg View Post
I have a set of Mavic Open Pro CD and Mavic MA2 wheels, both laced to Shimano Ultegra hubs, both doing well. Hand built in the late 90's. As just mentioned, Spinergy Rev-X wheels were the cutting edge (no pun intended) back in the 90's. IIRC Now, if you want to bump up the years some, again, which would you rather buy, a used set of 10 year old carbon wheels or a used set of 10 year old alloy wheels. I would still get the alloy. JMHO
Are you saying that if you want to buy a wheel that someone else has been using for decades, the cheaper option is what you might go with?
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 04-19-19, 09:58 PM
  #34  
cycledogg
Senior Member
 
cycledogg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: Cannondale CAAD4, CAAD5, CAAD7 (Optimo), '07 SystemSix, '08 Trek TTX 9.0, 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo - ZIPP

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 323 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
Are you saying that if you want to buy a wheel that someone else has been using for decades, the cheaper option is what you might go with?
What I'm saying is alloy wheels in my opinion last longer than carbon wheels. And if I were given a choice of the two, considering age, I would spend my money on the alloy set.
cycledogg is offline  
Old 04-20-19, 05:35 AM
  #35  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,858

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 298 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8893 Post(s)
Liked 141 Times in 85 Posts
If I were given the choice between a 10-year-old set of alloy wheels and a 10-year-old set of carbon wheels, I'd slap myself upside the head for even considering a 10-year-old set of wheels.
WhyFi is offline  
Old 04-22-19, 01:53 PM
  #36  
SuperPershing
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
SuperPershing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 88
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Uhhhh this escalated quick. Guess some good infos and insights. But "Half of it is made up" so... oof. I just fear that i will waste my money cause i cant true my carbon wheels back like a alloy rim would. And btw, im planning to buy that quarter minim carbon clinchers in 38mm.
SuperPershing is offline  
Old 04-22-19, 03:07 PM
  #37  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 19,083
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7991 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 127 Posts
You can true carbon wheels.

The rim won't bend (permanently). If you hit something, like a pothole or whatever, here's what might happen, in order of how much force is involved:
  1. Nothing. The wheel will stay true. This is what usually happens.
  2. A spoke can unwind, it'll pull the wheel out of true until you fix the tension. The wheel will come back into perfect true.
  3. Your wheel will break.
Alloy and carbon rims are both breakable, if you hit then hard enough. A metal rim can be bent to the point where it can't be pulled back into perfect true, but that doesn't happen with carbon. Either it'll break, or it'll come back to shape.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 04-22-19, 05:08 PM
  #38  
BluFalconActual
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 262
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 12 Times in 8 Posts
I know these are mountain bike wheels, but it shows that carbon wheels can be built really tough if the manufacturer decides to.
For the record, my carbon Vision Metrons have been absolute tanks.
BluFalconActual is offline  
Likes For BluFalconActual:
Old 04-22-19, 05:20 PM
  #39  
peterraymond
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Carbon material has a higher strength to weight, so if you replaced aluminum with the same weight of carbon, the wheels would be stronger. That is, the carbon could take a larger load before the material limits were reached. However, carbon also has higher stiffness, so the same amount of deflection produces higher loads.

But, at one level, there's no competition. You can adjust the design for the same weight and higher strength for every scenario, the same strength and lighter weight, or some combination of the two.

This of course doesn't tell you how well the wheel was designed, or built.

The only simple answer is "it depends". I did see a fatigue test of carbon, aluminum and steel frames. The heaviest frame was steel and it had the shortest life. The lightest frame was carbon and it lasted the longest. The reality is that if you want to get the lightest possible part in any material, the strength will then be compromised, but a higher performance material will set the trade-off at a higher point.

I can't really speak to life, but carbon can certainly be strong. That's what Formula 1 race car crash protection is made out of and F1 probably has the best safety technology in the world.
peterraymond is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 01:22 AM
  #40  
Duragrouch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 9 Posts
There are several criteria for rim design materials:

- Yield Strength: How much the rim can deflect before yielding, but not fracturing.
- Ultimate Tensile Strength: How much the rim can deflect before fracturing.
*Note*: For "graceful degradation" failure mode, you want some "spread" between Yield and Ultimate strength, as that absorbs energy, and the rim may flat-spot, ruining it, but not completely falling apart, thus possibly avoiding a crash.

- Fatigue Strength: Resistance to cracking from cyclic (fluctuating) loading below the yield strength of the material.
- Stiffness (within the elastic range below the yield strength limit: Completely separate from strength.
- Heat resistance: Temperature at which the material begins to weaken.
- Heat transfer: Ability to dissipate braking heat (does not apply if disc brakes instead of rim brakes).
- Hardness and abrasion resistance to brake pads: (also does not apply if disc brakes instead of rim brakes).

OK now. Let's sort this out.

+ Carbon is light and very strong for its weight. There is virtually no spread between yield and fatigue strength limit, its only failure mode is complete fracture. But the strength is high enough that at that load level, an aluminum rim would probably crumple as well.
+ Carbon is stiff *IF* the fibers are oriented in the correct direction. In fact, for some applications where you want stiff in one direction but softer in another direction (frames, for a good ride), carbon is spectacular compared to "isotropic" materials that have all the strength equal in all directions.
+ Carbon has fantastic fatigue resistance, especially compared to aluminum (which has no "fatigue limit", no stress level below which the rim will never fatigue. Aluminum will always fatigue eventually, it's just a question whether you get radial cracks at the spoke holes in 3 years or 100 years of riding*.)
- Carbon has terrible heat transfer and heat resistance (of the resin holding the carbon fibers together, not the fibers themselves) and abrasion resistance. If you have rim brakes and use them hard, like on a tandem touring over mountains, or a mountain or cross bike braking often in mud, you don't want carbon rims. In those respects, carbon rims are strictly for race/performance road bikes with meticulous brake pad cleaning to keep them clean from grit. Aluminum doesn't have tons of heat resistance either, it can begin to weaken below 300 degrees F, but it has superb heat transfer so you really have to abuse it to get it hot enough to hurt it, but it can be done. Even if not the whole rim, you can get local heating on the rim walls enough to weaken and cause problems like galling, but both are helped by hard anodizing for a harder surface and a grippier texture for the brake pads so more effective, less pressure needed.

* Each 10% reduction in stress roughly doubles the fatigue life. Using double-socketed rims that tie the spoke nipple into both inner and outer walls of the rim cuts stress in half, and even more because the sockets are wide and spread the load. But just cutting in half results in 2^^5 = 32X increase in fatigue strength (50%/10% = 5). The rims last practically forever. But they weigh a lot more due to all the steel sockets, and at the rim where it also increases rotating inertia.

SO... MY VIEW: Carbon rims can be great for a road race bike with frequent brake pad maintenance, or a road bike with disc brakes. In those cases, you will get the performance advantages of carbon (less weight), and the rims may be more durable over time. Otherwise, I would not use carbon rims due to the issues noted above.

Last edited by Duragrouch; 04-23-19 at 01:25 AM.
Duragrouch is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 07:25 AM
  #41  
cycledogg
Senior Member
 
cycledogg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: Cannondale CAAD4, CAAD5, CAAD7 (Optimo), '07 SystemSix, '08 Trek TTX 9.0, 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo - ZIPP

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 323 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Which will last longer? Carbon or alloy wheels? That's my concern.
cycledogg is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 09:21 AM
  #42  
woodcraft
Senior Member
 
woodcraft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 4,226
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1021 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 33 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by SuperPershing View Post
Uhhhh this escalated quick. Guess some good infos and insights. But "Half of it is made up" so... oof. I just fear that i will waste my money cause i cant true my carbon wheels back like a alloy rim would. And btw, im planning to buy that quarter minim carbon clinchers in 38mm.

Carbon rims will stay more true and be easier to get back to true than alloy ones.

On that score there's no contest.
woodcraft is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 11:59 AM
  #43  
cycledogg
Senior Member
 
cycledogg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: Cannondale CAAD4, CAAD5, CAAD7 (Optimo), '07 SystemSix, '08 Trek TTX 9.0, 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo - ZIPP

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 323 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Carbon rims will stay more true and be easier to get back to true than alloy ones.

On that score there's no contest.
Disagree. All my carbon rims are not accurate smooth. With in tolerance, yes, but true as my alloy rims, no. I can true up an alloy rim within .05mm. Carbon not so much. The brake surface on a carbon rim has too much variance to get within a .50mm all the way round. Plus, my alloy rims stay true much longer than the carbon rims. YMMV
cycledogg is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 12:12 PM
  #44  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 19,083
Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7991 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 127 Posts
Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Carbon rims will stay more true and be easier to get back to true than alloy ones.

On that score there's no contest.
Yep. Absolutely.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 12:33 PM
  #45  
woodcraft
Senior Member
 
woodcraft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Nor Cal
Posts: 4,226
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1021 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 33 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by cycledogg View Post
Disagree. All my carbon rims are not accurate smooth. With in tolerance, yes, but true as my alloy rims, no. I can true up an alloy rim within .05mm. Carbon not so much. The brake surface on a carbon rim has too much variance to get within a .50mm all the way round. Plus, my alloy rims stay true much longer than the carbon rims. YMMV


Huh.

IME, alloy rims deform & then take lots of variation in spoke tension to true, which tends not to last,

where carbon rims pretty much stay whatever shape they were made so they will go back to that shape with less input.
woodcraft is offline  
Old 04-23-19, 01:55 PM
  #46  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,632

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6838 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 215 Times in 179 Posts
What kind if thrashing to you plan on subjecting the wheels to?
fietsbob is offline  
Old 04-24-19, 12:46 PM
  #47  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 599 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by motosonic View Post
I think the answer to your question is a resounding no. While I am definitely not a carbon expert, I have done some digging on the matter in the past because I'm not a 150lb rider and it seems that carbon generally has weight restrictions on the rider where most aluminum wheels do not.
This tells me a few things... carbon fiber has a much lower tolerance under higher weights. which as you can imagine increases your chance of catastrophic failure considerably. That's not to say ALL carbon wheels would have this issue. As there are different ways to build a carbon wheel. But, if that's a concern. Go aluminum.
The second thing my research tells me is that carbon fiber is susceptible to weakening, warping, etc. from heat. So, if you have rim brake carbon rims, even though they make special pads for CF, you're still introducing heat and friction to a laminated surface. Do the math. Disc brakes I believe would eliminate much of that risk though.
While there may be more.. I think these small points really hit at the difference between MOST aluminum and Carbon wheels. Again, there are probably exceptions, but the question was 'generally'.
I hope this helps
Yeesh....lots of half info in here. Now I understand how scientists and medical professionals feel when people talk about science or medical issues.
Originally Posted by tyrion View Post
All wheels have a weight limit. Whether or not that limit has been determined in good faith and published - that's a different story.
^-- This.

Carbon is just a material. We use carbon fiber layups (a composite of carbon fiber weaves and resins) to make carbon components. Taken on it's own carbon is a lot "stronger" than aluminum. This allows us in the industry to build more complex shapes in wider and deeper depths at lower weight for the same or improved strength.

Nothing will fix a bad design though. You can have that with any material.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  
Old 04-24-19, 12:52 PM
  #48  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 599 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by SuperPershing View Post
My main point of getting a carbon wheelset is weight because having a high profile rim on a aluminum is heavy. But of course on a carbon, much much lighter. I need a high profile wheelset to better sustain speed for crits.
Ooooooo this one makes me sweat a little.

1. This has been discussed in many ways on lots of different threads. The better threads are on the actual racing forum.
2. There are some who will continue to say aero/deep over weight in crits. Those are usually the people who get to experience a crit off the front a lot. Those who don't will appreciate something lighter at the rim that will accelerate a bit snappier.
3. "Better sustain speed for crits" - is achieved by better positioning and better/smoother/lighter braking - not through wheel depth. You would know that if you raced crits though.
4. I'm just gonna yell troll on this one BUT there are some out there that I can feasibly see asking this as a question. Your answers are in this thread. Beware the tons of misinformation though. You came to a collection of random people on the internet with a science question. you get what you get.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  
Old 04-24-19, 01:03 PM
  #49  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 599 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by cycledogg View Post
Disagree. All my carbon rims are not accurate smooth. With in tolerance, yes, but true as my alloy rims, no. I can true up an alloy rim within .05mm. Carbon not so much. The brake surface on a carbon rim has too much variance to get within a .50mm all the way round. Plus, my alloy rims stay true much longer than the carbon rims. YMMV
This one causes me to break out in hives.

Carbon rims, on average, are orders of magnitude straighter and more consistent out of the box than aluminum rims are.
The fact that you say you can "I can true up an alloy rim within .05mm." demonstrates that this is something you seemingly have to do often and I assure you that if you true all of your aluminum rims to under 0.05mm that your tension variance is so high that you're rims are going out of true often when being ridden or you're paying an immense ton of money on your rims. Quite simply the extrusion process for creating an aluminum rim is highly prone to small issues that the vast majority of extruders just can not control. These small variances in something as little extrusion pressure can greatly affect wall thickness variance. That variance can be in spec but will require a large tension variance in the spokes in order to maintain true. All looks good on the stand then you ride it...womp womp.

To top this off the process for forming the extrusions into a round rim and then connecting the two ends (pinning, sleeving, welding, etc) is by it's nature another natural point in which small variances are introduced into the rim's shape. Back long ago all the Kinlin XR300 rims of which we sold 1,000+ all had the same slight low spot about an inch from the rim joint. Turns out that's where they had a clamp holding it while joining. It was consistent, repeatable and introduced a tension variance that you had to handle a certain way.

Carbon rims deviate from this immensely. While they do have variances - like all manufactured items - the number of them that you can simply bring up to tension and have be almost at finish spec initially is astonishing. The rims are way more consistent. They don't change through use like aluminum rims do as well.

I have piles of aluminum rims that have been rejected due to variances being bad enough to prevent me from being able to build with them. Not so with carbon. Lucky for me I get to stretch tubulars on them.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  
Likes For Psimet2001:
Old 04-24-19, 01:04 PM
  #50  
Psimet2001 
I eat carbide.
 
Psimet2001's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Elgin, IL
Posts: 20,593

Bikes: Lots. Van Dessel and Squid Dealer

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 599 Post(s)
Liked 23 Times in 18 Posts
Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Huh.

IME, alloy rims deform & then take lots of variation in spoke tension to true, which tends not to last,

where carbon rims pretty much stay whatever shape they were made so they will go back to that shape with less input.
This.
__________________
PSIMET Wheels, PSIMET Racing, PSIMET Neutral Race Support, and 11 Jackson Coffee
Podcast - YouTube Channel
Video about PSIMET Wheels

Psimet2001 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.