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Wheel "upgrade"

Old 04-26-19, 10:44 AM
  #1  
mcgeggy
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Wheel "upgrade"

I am a 205-215 lb. rider (93-98 kg), and I'm looking to get a set of summer riding wheels for my Cannondale Synapse 105 (rim brake). Currently I have Mavic Askium wheels on the bike. I ride about 80-120 miles/week.

I think I've narrowed it down to a few choices, which are lighter and slightly more aero from reputable builders, and in the $400-$600 range:

Neugent A310AS Alloy 31X24 Asym Rear Set (20/24 spoke count) Specifications

Blackset Race 30 700c Wheel Set (20/28 spoke count) Blackset Race 30 700c Wheel Set

Boyd Altamont Alloy Clincher Wheelset (20/28 spoke count) https://boydcycling.com/shop/road/al...cher-wheelset/

I will be using the new Conti 5000 tire 28mm.

Besides trying to narrow down my wheelset choice (the cheaper the better) I'm also wondering about how a wider rim will be with the chosen tire. I tried running the GP4000s2 tire in 28mm and ended up with some rubbing in the back. The rubbing was not apparent while riding, but after the first flat I noticed some light rub marks on the rear. The new 5000's are supposed to be true to listed size, whereas the 4000 tire ran wider than listed.

But still, should I be concerned with a wider rim than the stock Askiums? Probably should stick with a 25mm tire? Any negative experiences with the above wheels or builders?
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Old 04-26-19, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by mcgeggy View Post
Neugent A310AS Alloy 31X24 Asym Rear Set (20/24 spoke count) Specifications
"Spoke Tension Rear Drive Side: 170-180 KGF "

This is a result of a poorly designed rear hub.
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Old 04-26-19, 11:00 AM
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
"Spoke Tension Rear Drive Side: 170-180 KGF "

This is a result of a poorly designed rear hub.
Thanks, I had no idea. I did read some negative feedback about the aluminum free hub body gouging...
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Old 04-26-19, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
"Spoke Tension Rear Drive Side: 170-180 KGF "

This is a result of a poorly designed rear hub.
And a hopefully well-built rim....given that most rims everywhere target 120-130kgf max tension.
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Old 04-26-19, 11:22 AM
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What kind of riding (speed, elevation, road surface quality) do you intend for your new wheels? I would think that you'd find a much bigger difference going deep section, even if it meant paying a weight penalty with aluminum rims with carbon fairings to save some money, unless you're doing lots of extended 6%+ grades and need dedicated climbing wheels.

Speaking from experience, I noticed better liveliness but hardly any speed difference losing 500g and 16 spokes "upgrading" from a Giant OEM 30mm wheelset to Hunt Aero Light Discs as a 136lb rider doing about the same weekly mileage averaging 50ft/mi elev gain, mostly because I have to spend a lot of time on the flats. I'd much rather use the Hunt wheels than the Giants, but the Hunts were a compromise because I wanted nicer wheels when I didn't have confidence that I could handle deeper ones in crosswinds. I would not blink an eye at considering 50-60mm deep rims were I at your weight, OP.
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Old 04-26-19, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
"Spoke Tension Rear Drive Side: 170-180 KGF "

This is a result of a poorly designed rear hub.
He's kind of known for using super-high tensions regardless, isn't he?

I thought the point of asymmetrical rear rims was to avoid all that, but they're the successful wheel company and I'm just some schlub on the Internet.
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Old 04-26-19, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
He's kind of known for using super-high tensions regardless, isn't he?

I thought the point of asymmetrical rear rims was to avoid all that, but they're the successful wheel company and I'm just some schlub on the Internet.
I wouldn't go so far to call his wheel company successful, but this one is still a wheel company.
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Old 04-26-19, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
I wouldn't go so far to call his wheel company successful, but this one is still a wheel company.
I find their indifference to NDS tension interesting, too. Seems like that would be of some importance if you're trying to build a wheel that will still be true years in the future.
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Old 04-26-19, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
I find their indifference to NDS tension interesting, too. Seems like that would be of some importance if you're trying to build a wheel that will still be true years in the future.
If you compare the dimensions of his rear hub to other well known hubs, you'll see why the DS tension is so high. He needs to use very high DS tension, so that the NDS spokes don't go slack.

Sure you can build a wheel this way, but I doubt there's any benefit to it.
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Old 04-26-19, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
If you compare the dimensions of his rear hub to other well known hubs, you'll see why the DS tension is so high. He needs to use very high DS tension, so that the NDS spokes don't go slack.

Sure you can build a wheel this way, but I doubt there's any benefit to it.
I believe you. I try whenever possible to use hubs that don't force bad decisions on spoke tension.
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Old 04-26-19, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by mcgeggy View Post
I am a 205-215 lb. rider (93-98 kg), and I'm looking to get a set of summer riding wheels for my Cannondale Synapse 105 (rim brake).
Boyd Altamont Alloy Clincher Wheelset (20/28 spoke count) https://boydcycling.com/shop/road/al...cher-wheelset/
The Boyds will give you many miles of reliable service and great performance. Go with those!
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Old 04-26-19, 08:31 PM
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Another vote for Boyd. I weigh 220 and have a set of the ceramic Altamonts. Rock solid so far with 28f/32r.
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Old 04-27-19, 12:13 AM
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28mm GP4000s2 tires run 31mm on my Fulcrum Quatro LD wheels. GP5000 tires run 27.5mm on the same wheels. I had 1.5mm clearance in back with the 4000, and had some signs of rubbing. I could drive a semi through the clearance with the 5000s (joking of course).
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Old 04-27-19, 12:33 PM
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I think I'm liking Prowheelbuilder.com. They have plenty of options and brands to choose from, also a feature where you put your weight and intended use and it will label the various selections as "approved/recommended". So in the $700-$800 range I can get a lighter wheel with appropriate spoke count and decent hubs that should hold up and stay true like my Mavics do.
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Old 04-27-19, 12:55 PM
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I'm a fan of Mavic. I have an Aksium wheelset and a Kysrium Elite wheelset. Just bought a Mavic Ksyrium Elite UST rear. My experience is that they are bullet-proof. FWIW, I really like the tubeless UST and will probably get a front to create a wheelset.
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Old 04-28-19, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by mcgeggy View Post
I think I'm liking Prowheelbuilder.com. They have plenty of options and brands to choose from, also a feature where you put your weight and intended use and it will label the various selections as "approved/recommended". So in the $700-$800 range I can get a lighter wheel with appropriate spoke count and decent hubs that should hold up and stay true like my Mavics do.
In that price range consider Psimet.

If you have been satisfied with Aksium you are about to be surprised.
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Old 04-28-19, 10:03 AM
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mcgeggy
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
In that price range consider Psimet.

If you have been satisfied with Aksium you are about to be surprised.
Lol, surprised in a good way?
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Old 04-28-19, 05:23 PM
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Originally Posted by mcgeggy View Post
I think I'm liking Prowheelbuilder.com. They have plenty of options and brands to choose from, also a feature where you put your weight and intended use and it will label the various selections as "approved/recommended". So in the $700-$800 range I can get a lighter wheel with appropriate spoke count and decent hubs that should hold up and stay true like my Mavics do.
Prowheelbuilder is what ive used when I've bought premade wheels. They come true, properly tensioned(ive checked) and are a good price.
Nothing proprietary or difficult to replace either, which is nice.
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Old 04-29-19, 06:38 AM
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Yes, you will be surprised in a good way.

About tire rubbing. You don't want any. At all. Older Aksium was narrow, newer Aksium is same as most new wheels. Wider rims make any tire mount wider. GP4K in 28 was notorious for running very wide. The GP4K in 25 also runs wide. "Runs true to size" seems to be true for the 5000, but rim width and even rim design can throw curves at you.
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Old 04-29-19, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by 63rickert View Post
In that price range consider Psimet.
This. I'm 225 and they've been great.
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Old 04-29-19, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by mcgeggy View Post
I think I'm liking Prowheelbuilder.com. They have plenty of options and brands to choose from, also a feature where you put your weight and intended use and it will label the various selections as "approved/recommended". So in the $700-$800 range I can get a lighter wheel with appropriate spoke count and decent hubs that should hold up and stay true like my Mavics do.
I purchased gravel wheels from prowheelbuilder and picked them up at their shop in suburban Georgia.

Give them a call. Ask to speak with the owner Richard.

Richard is the only person in Atlanta I trust to touch my wheels including the store bought ones on my other bikes. To many twisted/broken spokes from going to the LBS.



-Tim-
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