Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

New bike away goal weight

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

New bike away goal weight

Old 07-09-19, 05:20 PM
  #1  
Clydesdalecliff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: ATL GA metro
Posts: 14

Bikes: 2016 Emonda S5, Navigator 200

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
New bike away goal weight

I know color really doesn't have much top do with a bike's performance, and a well practiced cyclist can be better at mechanical shifting than a rank amateur with electronic shifting; here's my question.
When I reach goal weight I can get a new bike. The one I really like had an awesome color scheme, and Ultegra Di2 disc and carbon hoops, another bike has mechanical Di2 disc and carbon hoops, but I'm not a fan of the paint? Should I get the higher level spec and paint job I longer or get the fully adequate mechanical with functional paint? Both frames are same level from same manufacturer.
Clydesdalecliff is offline  
Old 07-09-19, 05:34 PM
  #2  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,784
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1730 Post(s)
Liked 834 Times in 414 Posts
Originally Posted by Clydesdalecliff View Post
I know color really doesn't have much top do with a bike's performance
Color has everything top do with a bike's performance.
HTupolev is offline  
Likes For HTupolev:
Old 07-09-19, 05:55 PM
  #3  
MSchott
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Farmington Hills, MI
Posts: 374

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Roubaix Sport SL4

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 94 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 33 Posts
What do you mean by “mechanical DI2”? DI2 is electric shifting. Do you mean regular mechanical shifting? If the prices are the same, get the one with electronic shifting unless you absolutely hate the color scheme.
MSchott is offline  
Old 07-09-19, 06:21 PM
  #4  
Clydesdalecliff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: ATL GA metro
Posts: 14

Bikes: 2016 Emonda S5, Navigator 200

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
Color has everything top do with a bike's performance.
Clydesdalecliff is offline  
Old 07-09-19, 06:22 PM
  #5  
Clydesdalecliff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: ATL GA metro
Posts: 14

Bikes: 2016 Emonda S5, Navigator 200

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I meant to say mechanical Ultegra disc.
Clydesdalecliff is offline  
Old 07-09-19, 06:25 PM
  #6  
alcjphil
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 4,343
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1114 Post(s)
Liked 511 Times in 338 Posts
Originally Posted by Clydesdalecliff View Post
I know color really doesn't have much top do with a bike's performance, and a well practiced cyclist can be better at mechanical shifting than a rank amateur with electronic shifting; here's my question.
When I reach goal weight I can get a new bike. The one I really like had an awesome color scheme, and Ultegra Di2 disc and carbon hoops, another bike has mechanical Di2 disc and carbon hoops, but I'm not a fan of the paint? Should I get the higher level spec and paint job I longer or get the fully adequate mechanical with functional paint? Both frames are same level from same manufacturer.
Here is the deal: with electronic shifting, pros and beginners are all equal as far as shifting goes. If you want the lightest bike possible, buy one with your preference of mechanical groupset. If you are so focussed on appearance, buy the bike that looks best to you. By the time you reach your goal weight, the colour scheme you are looking for may no longer exist. Honestly, I have no idea what my bike looks like when I am riding it, all I think about is how it pretty much disappears under me and does what I want it to when I want it to.
alcjphil is offline  
Likes For alcjphil:
Old 07-09-19, 06:45 PM
  #7  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 21,749
Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14058 Post(s)
Liked 5,167 Times in 2,930 Posts
Originally Posted by Clydesdalecliff View Post
I meant to say mechanical Ultegra disc.
I ride a Cervelo C3. I planned to buy it in mechanical Ultegra disc, but they were about to release a new model and the shop offered me Di2 for the same price. I had never even ridden a bike with electronic shifting, I kept hearing once you try it you'll never go back, and I didn't want to make my hobby even more expensive. Honestly after the test ride I preferred mech. You feel slightly more connected to the bike. But I bought Di2 and two years later I'm so glad I did.

You can't go wrong either way at this level.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Likes For Seattle Forrest:
Old 07-09-19, 06:54 PM
  #8  
ColonelSanders
Senior Member
 
ColonelSanders's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 3,944

Bikes: 2017 Surly Troll with XT Drive Train, 2017 Merida Big Nine XT Edition, 2016 Giant Toughroad SLR 2, 1995 Trek 830

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1282 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post


Honestly after the test ride I preferred mech. You feel slightly more connected to the bike. But I bought Di2 and two years later I'm so glad I did.

What made you change your mind about how you felt about Di2?


Did the feeling of being more connected to the bike without Di2 change?
ColonelSanders is offline  
Old 07-10-19, 10:19 AM
  #9  
joelcool
Senior Member
 
joelcool's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Folsom, CA
Posts: 303

Bikes: Road, Commuter, Mountain, Tandem and a couple others

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 87 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 40 Times in 27 Posts
Originally Posted by Clydesdalecliff View Post
I know color really doesn't have much top do with a bike's performance, and a well practiced cyclist can be better at mechanical shifting than a rank amateur with electronic shifting; here's my question.
When I reach goal weight I can get a new bike. The one I really like had an awesome color scheme, and Ultegra Di2 disc and carbon hoops, another bike has mechanical Di2 disc and carbon hoops, but I'm not a fan of the paint? Should I get the higher level spec and paint job I longer or get the fully adequate mechanical with functional paint? Both frames are same level from same manufacturer.
Reaching a goal weight is a huge accomplishment. Get the one you like the best, you deserve it - you're the one who lost all that weight. Congrats!
joelcool is offline  
Likes For joelcool:
Old 07-10-19, 10:39 AM
  #10  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 21,749
Mentioned: 72 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14058 Post(s)
Liked 5,167 Times in 2,930 Posts
Originally Posted by ColonelSanders View Post
What made you change your mind about how you felt about Di2?


Did the feeling of being more connected to the bike without Di2 change?
I used to get to the top of a hill and have my finger on the shifter, half pressed, ready to go the instant I reached the crest. If you think about it, there's no actual reason to do that, it's not like pressing the thing halfway was the slow part. Mech shifters fit my fingers better too. Just a bunch of little stuff like that.

I bought Di2 instead because at the price, I thought I'd be dumb not to.

I still feel like I gave something (small) up, but I guess there's a different kind of feeling of connection in the sense that I know whenever I ask for a shift it's going to be immediate and drama free.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Likes For Seattle Forrest:
Old 07-10-19, 11:18 AM
  #11  
Abe_Froman
Senior Member
 
Abe_Froman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,566

Bikes: Marin Four Corners, 1960's Schwinn Racer in middle of restoration, mid 70s Motobecane Grand Touring, various other heaps.

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9346 Post(s)
Liked 56 Times in 50 Posts
****, if I got to buy a new bike every time I lost some weight, I'd have disappeared years ago
Abe_Froman is offline  
Old 07-10-19, 12:58 PM
  #12  
Dean V
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,751
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1006 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 201 Times in 118 Posts
I would go for the Di2 for the shifters. I prefer Di2 Hydro levers over the mechanical as they look better and are less bulky which I find to be more comfortable.
Dean V is offline  
Likes For Dean V:
Old 07-10-19, 03:37 PM
  #13  
ronin4740
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Reno Nevada
Posts: 123

Bikes: Giant TCR, Pure City Original Fixie, Fuji Roubaix, Raleigh M800

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 14 Posts
I test rode bikes with hydraulic and mechanical disc brakes last year when I was trying to find one which fit me. At that time Di2 wasn't in my budget but bikes with 105 and Ultegra mechanical shifting were and the Ultegra groups were spec'ing hydraulic brakes.

I liked the hydraulic versions much better than the mechanical... They stopped better, faster and more precisely in my opinion. The cable seemed to need more force to get the same stopping power and it felt like there was some give in the lever as I increased braking force.

Since then I was fortunate enough to find an Ultegra Di2, hydraulic disc brake equipped Giant Road bike for a really good price and have to say that I'm really glad that I was able to fund this purchase. Shifting under load is precise and predictable in situations where once in a while the 105 groupset on the bike this one replaced would not always shift up reliably. With the Di2 if I'm climbing a hill and want to go up the rear cassette it shifts up without fail. The 105 would do this 95% of the time...

I've converted that road bike to a flat bar hybrid, have ridden it to work a few times since owning the Giant and while it shifts okay it's just never going to be as buttery smooth as Di2 can be when properly setup.

So, if it were me and I were treating myself to a new bike it would have Ultegra Di2 shifting with Hydraulic disc brakes. That's my .02.
ronin4740 is offline  
Likes For ronin4740:
Old 07-10-19, 05:02 PM
  #14  
surak
Senior Member
 
surak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,400

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix, Canyon Inflite AL SLX, Priority Continuum Onyx, Santana Vision, Kent Dual-Drive Tandem

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 589 Post(s)
Liked 411 Times in 233 Posts
I thought I would love Di2, test rode a Di2 equipped bike and also felt disconnected from shifting the way Forrest described, but eventually bought it anyway because it was the better deal.

I've grown to appreciate Di2 more after several months with it. Di2 is consistent, needs no force, auto-trims the FD, and displays the gear ratio on my bike computer. Doesn't ruin mechanical shifting for me though.
surak is offline  
Likes For surak:
Old 07-10-19, 06:24 PM
  #15  
colnago62
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 2,331
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 330 Times in 199 Posts
Both my road bikes are Di2, but I still have mechanical on the indoor trainer bike. I like Di2 more, but it would not be a deal breaker on a new bike.
colnago62 is offline  
Likes For colnago62:
Old 07-10-19, 09:09 PM
  #16  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 12,452

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 97 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5170 Post(s)
Liked 2,478 Times in 1,449 Posts
You are asking if you should get a bike you really like the look of that has quality components, or a bike you don't like the look of that has quality components.

Which to get- hmm...
mstateglfr is offline  
Likes For mstateglfr:
Old 07-11-19, 10:38 AM
  #17  
Gconan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 647

Bikes: Norco search xr

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 194 Post(s)
Liked 142 Times in 87 Posts
Get the one with the good paint job if it has good enough components. Hardly ever do I see a new bike with a color that I like.
Gconan is offline  
Old 07-12-19, 08:56 AM
  #18  
eric1971
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 306
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 72 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 6 Posts
If it is in your budget, get the one you like more. The more you like the bike, the more likely you are to ride it. It can save money in the long run as well. Buy the bike you like the first time, instead of having to upgrade later because you were not happy with your purchase.
eric1971 is offline  
Old 12-20-19, 07:17 AM
  #19  
Clydesdalecliff
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: ATL GA metro
Posts: 14

Bikes: 2016 Emonda S5, Navigator 200

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Update on weight loss

Originally Posted by Clydesdalecliff View Post
I know color really doesn't have much top do with a bike's performance, and a well practiced cyclist can be better at mechanical shifting than a rank amateur with electronic shifting; here's my question.
When I reach goal weight I can get a new bike. The one I really like had an awesome color scheme, and Ultegra Di2 disc and carbon hoops, another bike has mechanical Di2 disc and carbon hoops, but I'm not a fan of the paint? Should I get the higher level spec and paint job I longer or get the fully adequate mechanical with functional paint? Both frames are same level from same manufacturer.
I've dropped 100 pounds from my highest recorded weight, and my wife moved the goal posts, in my favor. I started the process 10# less than my highest record because the lower point is where I actually started the plan. We have agreed that since we're in the Christmas season we're waiting until after the first of the year at te earliest to move on the new bike. Now the bike I like with Ultegra Di2 disc is available in the same paint job with Force AXS. The AXS costs more, but the drive train modifications from stock are less expensive overall by the time I'm done than Di2; AXS needs only cassette and chain for gear range, and had a less expensive power meter option, Di2 requires new RD, cassette, chain, and the power meter is twice the cost of the one for AXS. I'm really leaning toward the AXS equipped bike because of final cost.
Clydesdalecliff is offline  
Old 12-20-19, 09:17 AM
  #20  
bruce19
Senior Member
 
bruce19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lebanon (Liberty Hill), CT
Posts: 7,764

Bikes: CAAD 12, MASI Gran Criterium S, Colnago World Cup CX & Guru steel

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1432 Post(s)
Liked 813 Times in 487 Posts
Originally Posted by Clydesdalecliff View Post
I know color really doesn't have much top do with a bike's performance, and a well practiced cyclist can be better at mechanical shifting than a rank amateur with electronic shifting; here's my question.
When I reach goal weight I can get a new bike. The one I really like had an awesome color scheme, and Ultegra Di2 disc and carbon hoops, another bike has mechanical Di2 disc and carbon hoops, but I'm not a fan of the paint? Should I get the higher level spec and paint job I longer or get the fully adequate mechanical with functional paint? Both frames are same level from same manufacturer.
First...congrats on having and attaining a goal weight. If it was my call I'd buy the one that speaks to me. If I look at my bike and love it, that's worth a lot.
bruce19 is offline  
Likes For bruce19:
Old 12-20-19, 10:23 AM
  #21  
Maelochs
Senior Member
 
Maelochs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 12,684

Bikes: 2015 Workswell 066, 2014 Dawes Sheila, 1983 Cannondale 500, 1984 Raleigh Olympian, 2007 Cannondale Rize 4, 2017 Fuji Sportif 1 LE

Mentioned: 142 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6070 Post(s)
Liked 958 Times in 542 Posts
Originally Posted by Abe_Froman View Post
****, if I got to buy a new bike every time I lost some weight, I'd have disappeared years ago
Yeah ... but if I had to give the bike back every time I gained weight, I'd be several bikes in debt.
Maelochs is offline  
Old 12-20-19, 02:29 PM
  #22  
melikebikey35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 258

Bikes: Cervelo R5 disc - Limited, Cervelo Aspero

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Liked 127 Times in 64 Posts
Originally Posted by Clydesdalecliff View Post
I've dropped 100 pounds from my highest recorded weight, and my wife moved the goal posts, in my favor. I started the process 10# less than my highest record because the lower point is where I actually started the plan. We have agreed that since we're in the Christmas season we're waiting until after the first of the year at te earliest to move on the new bike. Now the bike I like with Ultegra Di2 disc is available in the same paint job with Force AXS. The AXS costs more, but the drive train modifications from stock are less expensive overall by the time I'm done than Di2; AXS needs only cassette and chain for gear range, and had a less expensive power meter option, Di2 requires new RD, cassette, chain, and the power meter is twice the cost of the one for AXS. I'm really leaning toward the AXS equipped bike because of final cost.
I'd gladly pay more for Di2...Force AXS is heavy, clunky shifting, not as reliable, and replacement parts (cassette/chain) are ridiculously expensive. Plus, I'm pretty sure you can talk the shop into switching out the Di2 rear derailleur for a minimal fee. And if not, you can sell it and come close to breaking even.

From what I've seen, Force AXS bikes are usually ~$500 more than their Di2 counterparts, so I'd think that even with the higher PM price, the Di2 option would end up being pretty close to the AXS, when it's all said and done.
melikebikey35 is offline  
Old 12-20-19, 02:40 PM
  #23  
Cypress 
Globo Gym lifetime member
 
Cypress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Salem, Oregon
Posts: 5,203

Bikes: Fast ones

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 410 Post(s)
Liked 612 Times in 305 Posts
Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
. If you want the lightest bike possible, buy one with your preference of mechanical groupset.
Old post, but Ultegra DI2 weighs less than mechanical Ultegra.
__________________
Cypress is offline  
Old 12-22-19, 01:35 PM
  #24  
Bah Humbug
runner
 
Bah Humbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Austin
Posts: 17,036

Bikes: S1, R2, P2

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6544 Post(s)
Liked 1,932 Times in 1,048 Posts
Outside of no equal options under budget, I'd never buy a bike I didn't like the looks of. That's just a bad buy at any price.
Bah Humbug is offline  
Likes For Bah Humbug:
Old 12-22-19, 02:02 PM
  #25  
billridesbikes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Posts: 450
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 180 Post(s)
Liked 259 Times in 157 Posts
You’re married to the frame, so get the frame and paint scheme you really like and want.

You’re only dating the components, and you can always get different or better ones later.
billridesbikes is offline  
Likes For billridesbikes:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.