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Speedplay n00b questions

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Speedplay n00b questions

Old 07-31-19, 12:06 PM
  #1  
rosefarts
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Speedplay n00b questions

I found an incredible deal on a pair of 4 bolt shoes and I've always kinda wanted Speedplay, so here I am. Kindof the opposite of most folks, shoes first then get pedals to fit.

I don't know much about them other than lots of float and they look like Oreo cookies with axles.

The shoes came with Zero cleats with protector plates on the underside. The plastic piece sandwiched appears worn out. Is this piece replaceable or is this a sign that I should get new cleats? I only ask because eBay is rife with pedals that don't have cleats, should I choose to buy used.

Aside from that, when shopping (probably for Zeros, since I want to be able to adjust the float, what should I look for? I like a firm connection to the pedal, does the color indicate tension or is that just decorative?

Is there a bearing/longevity difference from Chromo to SS to ti or is the only difference in weight?
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Old 07-31-19, 12:23 PM
  #2  
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You want to make sure there is no play in the pedal otherwise you will have to rebuild with new bearings. The pedals are usually relatively cheap and the cleats are expensive compared to other brands. You also want the walkable cleat covers.
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Old 07-31-19, 12:43 PM
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Just get a new set of Speedplay Zeros. They will come with new walkable cleats. Do not buy the easy access ones, since you like a firm connection.

Color is only cosmetic. Spindle only affects weight. (WW Tip - buy a set of Chromoly pedals, then get a J&L Ti axle off eBay for $30.)

As for rebuild or replace, I generally find it's a lot easier to replace the pedals than to rebuild. The rebuild kits aren't that cheap, and you have to pull the bearings out of the old pedals and re-insert into the new. I'd rather have new bearings too. Additionally, sometimes the screw that holds the pedal body in place gets stuck in there and does not want to come out. A simple trick for evaluating wear on the pedal bodies is to look at the R and L on there. If that's worn off, the pedals are nearing replacement age.

If your shoes have carbon soles, you may want to buy a set of Carbon Sole Protectors for your shoes - these are thin strips of metal with slightly longer screws to put the pedals on your 4-bolt shoes. They cost like $10 a set. You can reuse them with new cleats, but they always seem a bit mangled to me, so I tend to replace them with my cleats. Your LBS probably won't have these in stock. If your shoes have plastic ones, those are likely shims for either adjusting cleat angle or stack height.

There are care instructions online. You will want to re-grease the pedals pretty regularly, particularly when they start to spin a bit looser. You don't need a grease gun. A basic plastic syringe filled with Finish Line grease works fine.

Float can be adjusted by the screws on your cleats. Even with a lot of float, you are very unlikely to accidentally unclip from Speedplays. Also, just a heads up, even when clipped in and everything is new, Speedplays have a bit more wobble than something like Look Keos.

Lastly, you likely will need to adjust your saddle height. The stack on Speedplays is about 5mm lower than Look Keos.

I have the Speedplay cleat lube, but rarely use it.
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Old 07-31-19, 12:56 PM
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Have used both chromo and stainless steel spindles.
As far as feel goes; seemed the same to me. I believe
it's all the same bearings regardless of material. One thing
though; the spindles usually get shorter(Q factor) as the
weight goes down.
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Old 07-31-19, 01:27 PM
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Thanks guys.

The best advice here was about the R and L and being able to upgrade to TI for $30. I found a pair of TI spindled Zero's for $120 on eBay, the body was completely worn and they had no cleats. After reading some of these comments, that sure didn't sound like a good deal. I ended up buying Chromo with cleats for $115. If that starts to seem heavy, $30 at any point in the future can correct it.

Also, lime green, same color as all my cable housing

I'll be sure not to mix up my sealant syringe and lube syringe now.

Plates, the shoes came with them. Yes a little grungy but fine.

Since I bought new pedals, I'll be able to read the instructions on how to adjust the float. There is some value in that too.

Thanks again.
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Old 07-31-19, 02:42 PM
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OP. One other thing you should know:

You will want to keep the screws from your current shoes and re-use them on the new shoes. The screws that come with your new cleats are not long enough to fully secure the cleat with the metal sole protector. (They will work fine if you do not use the sole protector.) I've tried making my own sole protector replacements and buying longer screws at the hardware store, but I've never quite managed to make it work well enough.
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Old 07-31-19, 03:40 PM
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rosefarts
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Originally Posted by topflightpro View Post
OP. One other thing you should know:

You will want to keep the screws from your current shoes and re-use them on the new shoes. The screws that come with your new cleats are not long enough to fully secure the cleat with the metal sole protector. (They will work fine if you do not use the sole protector.) I've tried making my own sole protector replacements and buying longer screws at the hardware store, but I've never quite managed to make it work well enough.
Funny that you mention it. I took the old cleats off one shoe and really didn't feel like they were in far enough. I was already planning a trip to the metric section of the hardware store.
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Old 07-31-19, 07:39 PM
  #8  
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Everyone I know who uses Speedplay either likes 'em (about six guys) or doesn't dislike them enough to change (a friend who switched from SPD-SL to Speedplay and still has trouble clipping in).

I considered trying Speedplay but I'm so accustomed to Look Delta I just can't find a reason to switch. Well, other than Delta cleats being terrible for walking any farther than to the bathroom or bar for another beer.
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Old 08-01-19, 04:59 AM
  #9  
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Originally Posted by topflightpro View Post

Color is only cosmetic. Spindle only affects weight. (WW Tip - buy a set of Chromoly pedals, then get a J&L Ti axle off eBay for $30.)

As for rebuild or replace, I generally find it's a lot easier to replace the pedals than to rebuild. The rebuild kits aren't that cheap, and you have to pull the bearings out of the old pedals and re-insert into the new. I'd rather have new bearings too. Additionally, sometimes the screw that holds the pedal body in place gets stuck in there and does not want to come out. A simple trick for evaluating wear on the pedal bodies is to look at the R and L on there. If that's worn off, the pedals are nearing replacement age.
...

I have the Speedplay cleat lube, but rarely use it.
The rebuild kits aren't cheap, but I'm pretty sure they come with new bearings pre-installed. eg.
EDIT: I take it back.. there is a "bearings are sold separately" mention underneath.. which is curious, as I did an X-pedal rebuild kit and the bearings come installed (though don't come with bowties which I didn't need anyway).

https://www.excelsports.com/main.asp...ajor=5&minor=6

I think you could even get one of these, plus the J+Ls and do alright on price.. though you'd still need cleats.

Cleat Lube: this works great.. enough to last you a long long time.

DuPont Teflon Dry Non-Stick

Last edited by Sy Reene; 08-01-19 at 05:03 AM.
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Old 08-01-19, 06:28 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
The rebuild kits aren't cheap, but I'm pretty sure they come with new bearings pre-installed. eg.
EDIT: I take it back.. there is a "bearings are sold separately" mention underneath.. which is curious, as I did an X-pedal rebuild kit and the bearings come installed (though don't come with bowties which I didn't need anyway).

https://www.excelsports.com/main.asp...ajor=5&minor=6

I think you could even get one of these, plus the J+Ls and do alright on price.. though you'd still need cleats.

Cleat Lube: this works great.. enough to last you a long long time.

DuPont Teflon Dry Non-Stick
When you consider the cost of the rebuild kit versus new Chromoly pedals, which come with cleats, it makes a lot more sense to just buy a new set of pedals.

And if you already have SS or Ti spindles, you can pull off the old bodies, pop on the new one ones, put the old bodies on the Chromo spindles and try to sell them on CL. Of course, this assumes the old bodies will come off. At this point, I'd estimate about 40 percent of the time, the screw holding the pedal body on does not want to come out of an old pedal.
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Old 08-01-19, 07:29 AM
  #11  
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The numbers add up far better to get new chromo and think about a future TI spindle.

The last TI pedals I had we're Onza HO circa about 1994. I bought them with my paper route.
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Old 08-01-19, 09:54 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Everyone I know who uses Speedplay either likes 'em (about six guys) or doesn't dislike them enough to change (a friend who switched from SPD-SL to Speedplay and still has trouble clipping in).

I considered trying Speedplay but I'm so accustomed to Look Delta I just can't find a reason to switch. Well, other than Delta cleats being terrible for walking any farther than to the bathroom or bar for another beer.
I used to use speedplay dating back to 1997... first X then light action and I finally changed to Look Keo. Except for clipping in being harder (no need to align the pedal with speedplay) they're better for me. No more hotspot! And frankly, the Looks are cheaper to buy and operate
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Old 08-01-19, 10:10 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
I used to use speedplay dating back to 1997... first X then light action and I finally changed to Look Keo. Except for clipping in being harder (no need to align the pedal with speedplay) they're better for me. No more hotspot! And frankly, the Looks are cheaper to buy and operate
You need a stiff soled shoe with SP's.
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Old 08-01-19, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by rosefarts View Post
The numbers add up far better to get new chromo and think about a future TI spindle.

The last TI pedals I had we're Onza HO circa about 1994. I bought them with my paper route.
Beware the weight limits of ti spindles.

Speedplay are neat mouse traps...if you can stand the company's business practices and how much the blasted cleats cost to replace....and don't get mud/dirt in the cleats.
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Old 08-01-19, 10:36 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by topflightpro View Post
OP. One other thing you should know:

You will want to keep the screws from your current shoes and re-use them on the new shoes. The screws that come with your new cleats are not long enough to fully secure the cleat with the metal sole protector. (They will work fine if you do not use the sole protector.) I've tried making my own sole protector replacements and buying longer screws at the hardware store, but I've never quite managed to make it work well enough.
You might want to take a look at this:
https://www.excelsports.com/main.asp...ajor=5&minor=6

Multiple lengths of screws available. I use the 13mm ones and they seem to be exactly the right length for my Sidis.
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Old 08-01-19, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by popeye View Post
You need a stiff soled shoe with SP's.
My shoes are plenty stiff - sidi wire push. And they were an improvement over the old sidi genius 5 shoes I had before but still....
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