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AXIS 2.0 Rear Wheel Upgrade Recommendations, Please.

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AXIS 2.0 Rear Wheel Upgrade Recommendations, Please.

Old 08-03-19, 12:17 PM
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Antt
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AXIS 2.0 Wheel/Wheelset Upgrade Recommendations, Please.

Hi guys. I've had my 11-speed Specialized Roubaix Sport for three years now (bought it brand new in 2016) and my rear rim cracked near the spokes, so I'm contemplating getting a new wheel or possibly an entirely new wheel set.

I'm willing to spend up to $1,000 for two wheels (clinchers), though I'm okay with spending less...or more. Looking for comfort (this is pretty huge for me), speed (almost equally as important), durability and finally (or at least I think this is it)...a reliable and established company. If a $500 wheel set can achieve this for me, please let me know. Otherwise, between $100 and $1,000 for two wheels is the budget. Running on 25c GP4000 II's, by the way.

Thanks!

Last edited by Antt; 08-04-19 at 12:50 AM.
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Old 08-03-19, 12:41 PM
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One more question for anyone that's willing to share their views.

When it comes to wheelsets, at what price point do the differences become pretty negligible for most riders? I'm no pro, but I'm not an amateur either. For a somewhat "regular" rider, do you think there would be a noticeable difference between a $100 rim and a $600 one? How about $100 and $1,000+? Do they last longer? Do they ride smoother, faster, etc? Not sure if I'm even asking the right question or if the question makes sense to you guys, but any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
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Old 08-03-19, 03:18 PM
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Can you have the rear wheel rebuilt? That may be your least expensive option.

Otherwise, it's really hard to offer suggestions. What do you want from your wheel? Light, aero, durable, cheap, some combination?

And yes, it's totally ok to run different wheels front and back.
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Old 08-03-19, 03:44 PM
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Honestly, I don't know. I mean the guys at my LBS asked me to see if I could get it warrantied and told me that would be my best option, but made no mention of getting it rebuilt. I had no clue they could even fix splits/cracks like that. In fact, he said, "there's nothing I could do", but I was there to get the tire trued (hadn't realize what the realized what the issue was at the time), so not sure if he meant he couldn't true it because it was cracked or if there was nothing that could be done at all with the wheel itself.

As for what I'm looking for? Mainly speed and comfort (more comfort than speed, but if I could have both, I'll take it), but would also like them to be durable as well.

Some guy suggested I go with an entry-level DT Swiss. Would they fit the bill or no?
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Old 08-03-19, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by topflightpro View Post
Can you have the rear wheel rebuilt? That may be your least expensive option.
.


Actually that may not be cost effective. The cost of a decent rim, new spokes, and labor could easily exceed the cost of buying a rim a whole new wheel. I suggest OP look at sites like Velomine.com for a good quality replacement. Often entire wheelsets using ultegra or 105 hubs on quality rims like Open Pro and H Plus Son are available for less $300; single wheels in the ballpark for what he wants to spend (I am assuming rim brakes).
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Old 08-03-19, 08:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Antt View Post
. I had no clue they could even fix splits/cracks like that. In fact, he said, "there's nothing I could do", but I was there to get the tire trued (hadn't realize what the realized what ?
You canít fix cracks but you can salvage the hub and build it into a new rim. But, again, a new wheel mybe cheaper. And yes, a dt swiss wheel with 11 speed hub would fit the bill. I like dt swiss; they make good hubs and rims. I like shimano hubs better.
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Old 08-03-19, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by DOS View Post
You canít fix cracks but you can salvage the hub and build it into a new rim. But, again, a new wheel mybe cheaper. And yes, a dt swiss wheel with 11 speed hub would fit the bill. I like dt swiss; they make good hubs and rims. I like shimano hubs better.
Oh, I see. Okay. I don't know why my mind went straight to soldering. lol

Anyway, I've updated my post. So $1,000 for one or two wheels. Any brand or wheel set you would recommend?
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Old 08-04-19, 04:30 AM
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DT Swiss, straight pull spokes, 350 hubs, ratchet hub, prolock nipples. ER1600 Spline 32.

If you're desperate to save cash then the E1800 Spline 32 with 370 hubs.

Both are bullet proof kit with quality componentry and build.
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Old 08-04-19, 07:00 AM
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Axis 2.0 wheels: yes I had these on a 2016 Allez I used and then sold. I really punished these wheels, but they were totally solid. However, heavy wheelset.

Anyway, if it was me, I would find a matching new rim, tape it to the old damaged one, and transfer the spokes over one at a time. Total process, while watching TV, would take 90 minutes, including final tensioning retruing. Of course any bike shop will have zero motivations to do this pickey labor-intensive work, plus they'd rather sell you a new bike.

New wheels? You cannot do any better than say a set of mid-level Shimano or Campagnolo or Fulcrum wheels. Campagnolo Zonda wheels are outstanding value. At beyond say $500, clincher wheels plateau out in terms of diminishing returns.

If any higher wheel performance is required, as in you're racing for money, you'll be on tubulars.
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Old 08-04-19, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
At beyond say $500, clincher wheels plateau out in terms of diminishing returns.
That's essentially what I was trying to ask, but couldn't quite articulate. But yea, I saw the Campagnolo Zonda yesterday and was going to post them, but decided not to. Let me ask you this, though. I ride on 25mm tires, will the 22mm rim on the Zonda's be a good fit?
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Old 08-04-19, 12:04 PM
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Antt here. Long story short...couldn't log into my old account, so wound up creating a new one (i.e. Antt). Remembered my password for this account just now and was able to get back in. Sorry for the confusion/trouble this may cause anyone.

Originally Posted by illdrag0n View Post
DT Swiss, straight pull spokes, 350 hubs, ratchet hub, prolock nipples. ER1600 Spline 32.

If you're desperate to save cash then the E1800 Spline 32 with 370 hubs.

Both are bullet proof kit with quality componentry and build.
These?

https://www.merlincycles.com/en-us/d...0c-112361.html

They work as both clincher and tubeless, right? Also, is the fact that I'm running on an 11-speed anything I should consider when buying this wheel set? Or does that not matter?

EDIT: Thanks for the recommendation, but I believe these are for disc brakes. I use rim brakes.

Last edited by Ataylor; 08-04-19 at 01:07 PM.
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Old 08-04-19, 01:07 PM
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Since I have the 2018 Roubaix Sport, and changed out my wheels a few months ago, I'll add a few comments. I'm a 'fitness' rider, which means I'm not particularly concerned with maximizing speed, but more with improving ride 'quality'. I ride about 3500 miles per year.

I bought the Sport last November. It didn't take long before the ratcheting sound from the rear hub was driving me nuts. I'd had a 2010 Secteur before that, which ran silently, and so I started investigating wheelsets. Since on this forum there was a lot of discussion about tubeless, I thought I'd throw that into the mix.

The 2018 Sport's OEM wheels were the "Axis Sport disc"; it also came with Specialized in-house "Turbo Pro" 28mm tubed tires. I don't know how these wheels compare with the OP's, but I doubt mine are anything special.

After some checking, on ebay I found a listing for a 'tubeless-ready' Giant PX-2 wheelset that the seller had pulled off a new 2019 Giant Advanced Revolt. I picked them up for $202.62 shipped. At the same time, I ordered a set of 28mm Continental 5000TL tubeless tires. The wheels were an easy swap, no issues at all. The tires went on easily, along with some Orange Seal sealant.

Once I got everything installed and out on the road, I was absolutely amazed at the difference. The new wheels were silent, which was my main criteria. BUT, the biggest surprise was how much smoother and faster the new TIRES ran. Night and day difference between the tubed 25mm Conti Gatorskins I had on the Secteur (at 105 psi) and the 5000TL's (at 80 psi rear, 75 front). The speed increase was unexpected; my average speed on routes I've ridden for years has jumped by 1 or 2 mph with no noticeable increase in effort. It's just easier, and much less harsh than the Gatorskins.

Knowing what I know now, my impression is that it's the TIRES that have the greatest impact on ride quality. Since I live in a valley, and deal with absolutely no hills, I may have a different opinion if I had to do any climbing, where wheel weight, etc. makes a difference. But if the OP is going to be getting a new wheelset anyway, I'd recommend going tubeless and adding some decent tires. My original wheelset is in a box out in my garage, gathering dust, and that is where it is going to stay.

Last edited by sjh953; 08-04-19 at 01:26 PM.
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Old 08-04-19, 05:04 PM
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https://www.merlincycles.com/dt-swis...0c-108395.html

These are a comparative rim brake wheelset.

They come with tubeless tape installed and valves, but you can also run tubes.

They are 11 speed compatible, or 10 speed with included shim.

Doesn't look like Merlin has stock, but you may be able to find them around.
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Old 08-04-19, 07:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Antt View Post
Oh, I see. Okay. I don't know why my mind went straight to soldering. lol

Anyway, I've updated my post. So $1,000 for one or two wheels. Any brand or wheel set you would recommend?
Oh my, $1000 will get you a fine hand built wheel set. With that as your budget, shoot an email to https://sugarwheelworks.com/blog/ride-oregon-made.html or prowheelbuilder.com or another wheel builder,
tell them what kind of riding you do, and they will set you up.
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Old 08-04-19, 08:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Antt View Post
Looking for comfort (this is pretty huge for me)
The only thing about a wheel that should have any bearing on comfort is the width of the rim, or whether it's tubular or clincher.

If a wheel has any meaningful vertical compliance, the spoke tension would be so low there's no lateral rigidity.
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Old 08-04-19, 08:32 PM
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Originally Posted by sjh953 View Post
But if the OP is going to be getting a new wheelset anyway, I'd recommend going tubeless and adding some decent tires.
I definitely plan on going tubeless, to see if I'll prefer the ride over clinchers. Probably not this summer, though, I don't think, but at some later point in time. Would like to spend a good amount of time researching the wheels first before making a decision on what to buy.

Originally Posted by illdrag0n View Post
Doesn't look like Merlin has stock, but you may be able to find them around.
Found them on this site for $100 more bucks (if anyone knows of any cheaper sources, please let me know):

https://www.gambacicli.com/en/dt-swi...-wheelset.html

They'd fit 25mm tires, right?

Originally Posted by DOS View Post
Oh my, $1000 will get you a fine hand built wheel set.
Thanks, DOS. I'll keep custom wheels in mind for future purchases, but for now, I want something asap. Like within the next few days. So I'm just going to order either the Zonda's or the 1600's for now (by tonight, hopefully) and call it a day. I don't ride much during the colder seasons, so I don't want to waste more time than I need to. Appreciate the heads up, though. Thanks again.

Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
The only thing about a wheel that should have any bearing on comfort is the width of the rim, or whether it's tubular or clincher.
Thanks. The hybrid I rode years back was on 28's and I felt like I was on a recliner, so that makes sense.
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Old 08-04-19, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
Campagnolo Zonda wheels are outstanding value.
One other question for you or anyone else who wants to answer. Which hubs to go with? Shimano or the Campagnolo? Some sites charge $60 more for the Shimano freehubs while others charge about $60 more the Campagnolo and shops like Merlin, so I'm not sure which to choose and why.
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Old 08-04-19, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Ataylor View Post
Thanks, DOS. I'll keep custom wheels in mind for future purchases, but for now, I want something asap. Like within the next few days. So I'm just going to order either the Zonda's or the 1600's for now (by tonight, hopefully) and call it a day. I don't ride much during the colder seasons, so I don't want to waste more time than I need to. Appreciate the heads up, though. Thanks again.
.
Some other options

HED Ardennes.

https://www.competitivecyclist.com/h...oaAtOcEALw_wcB

or shop around for off the peg Ultegra hubs laced to HED Belgium rims.

Last edited by DOS; 08-05-19 at 07:49 AM.
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Old 08-04-19, 10:43 PM
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^ Thanks. Will look into them right now.
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Old 08-04-19, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Ataylor View Post
One other question for you or anyone else who wants to answer. Which hubs to go with? Shimano or the Campagnolo? Some sites charge $60 more for the Shimano freehubs while others charge about $60 more the Campagnolo and shops like Merlin, so I'm not sure which to choose and why.
If your using a Shimano/sram casette, you want a matching freehub
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Old 08-05-19, 12:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Ataylor View Post
One other question for you or anyone else who wants to answer. Which hubs to go with? I'm not sure which to choose and why.
I always pick Campagnolo. Superior shifting and ergonomics.

Finally, don't go tubeless. Same heavy, fragile rims as regular clinchers. Pain to set up.

My group ride was held up yesterday for 30 minutes in the middle of nowhere by someone with a tubeless tire deflation. Impossible to get the tire remounted without a compressor. Tried to insert a regular tube, which was only possible by sawing off the old stem with a hacksaw borrowed from a passing farmer.
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Old 08-05-19, 01:04 AM
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Originally Posted by illdrag0n View Post
If your using a Shimano/sram casette, you want a matching freehub
Makes sense. Thanks!

Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I always pick Campagnolo. Superior shifting and ergonomics.
Would you ever mix and match? If you had a Shimano cassette, would you still choose a Campagnolo freehub?

Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
My group ride was held up yesterday for 30 minutes in the middle of nowhere by someone with a tubeless tire deflation. Impossible to get the tire remounted without a compressor. Tried to insert a regular tube, which was only possible by sawing off the old stem with a hacksaw borrowed from a passing farmer.
That's crazy. But yea', I've heard about how much of a pain they are. Do you know if the claims about the speed are true, though? Supposedly the pick up and roll is noticeably faster than regular tubed tires.
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Old 08-05-19, 07:10 AM
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OP, you cannot put a Shimano/Sram cassette on a Campy freehub. You can run an 11-sp Campy cassette though.

If you need something now, take a look at Shimano Ultegra wheels. You can find a set for $300 or so. They're pretty solid, spin great, and are tubeless. They aren't the lightest or widest wheels, but they will work fine.
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Old 08-05-19, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer View Post
I always pick Campagnolo. Superior shifting and ergonomics.

Finally, don't go tubeless. Same heavy, fragile rims as regular clinchers. Pain to set up.

My group ride was held up yesterday for 30 minutes in the middle of nowhere by someone with a tubeless tire deflation. Impossible to get the tire remounted without a compressor. Tried to insert a regular tube, which was only possible by sawing off the old stem with a hacksaw borrowed from a passing farmer.
Ha, one bad experience does not a trend make.I have been riding with guys for years whose Bontrager clincher wheels are a bear to get tires on and off so every flat is an adventure. Meanwhile, my HED tubeless rims set up fairly easily, and the one flat I have had in 3 years was as easy to address with a tube as a regular clincher. A hacksaw, really? My stems pop right out without a tool as the nuts that hold them in place only need to be finger tight. Was there corrosion involved?
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Old 08-05-19, 08:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Ataylor View Post



That's crazy. But yea', I've heard about how much of a pain they are. Do you know if the claims about the speed are true, though? Supposedly the pick up and roll is noticeably faster than regular tubed tires.
If rollingresistance.com is to be believed, you achieve some rolling resistance benefit over comparable clincher with a standard tube, but I could achive the same result using latex tubes. The main benefit to me, aside from savings from not having to buy latex tubes, is ride quality. I ride at significantLy lower pressure on tubeless because I have no worries about pinch flats, which makes for a more plush ride.

Whether you go tubeless or not, go with a wider rim than standard road rims... >17mm internal width .. they are more aero and you will achieve rolling resistance benefit.
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