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Max Tire Pressure Label (700 x 32)

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Max Tire Pressure Label (700 x 32)

Old 07-13-22, 12:39 PM
  #126  
Duo
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Originally Posted by Badger6 View Post
No chance you damaged anything. None. Zero.

As for starting pressure using your bike+rider weight and estimating the speed as a moderate group ride on a worn tarmac surface (some cracks), start out at 62psi (4.3bar) R and 60.5 (4.2bar) F, and adjust up or down based on feel. https://silca.cc/pages/sppc-form

Just for reference, I have a bike that rolls on tires measuring 35mm when inflated, tubeless, and the recommended pressures are about 55psi (3.7bar) and I routinely run them below 50psi (3.2-3.3bar) with no issues.
good answer. i routinely inflate my tires to the recommended pressure or may 5 to 10 psi over. after riding a week the pressure may be down 10 psi or so, very easy to add the extra pressure or not.

i like more pressure in my tires for the feel; the tires are 35mm front and 32mm rear. these tires are much more comfy than my racing bike tires which are 25mm and inflate to about 100psi. my bikes are for recreational use, basically irrelevant what the inflation is as they travel on rural roads near my home. problems? generally no.

Last edited by Duo; 08-03-22 at 10:38 AM.
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Old 07-13-22, 09:06 PM
  #127  
ofajen
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I weigh slightly less but my bike is a few pounds more, so total weight will be about the same. I ride 700x32s on crushed stone trails (call it category 1 gravel) and usually about 58 psi rear and 56 psi front. Slightly lower is actually faster but starts to feel too soft to suit my taste. On just roads I might go up a couple PSI, but I suspect it wouldn’t be faster, only firmer.

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Old 07-18-22, 11:25 AM
  #128  
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Gotta love thread revives!

I never exceed the recommended pressure. It's almost always too high anyways...

Riding tubeless 28mms tires on hookless rims @ 68PSI rear & 65PSI front and I weigh 165lbs. I know I could go lower, but I find it's the sweet spot.

I doubt you'd damage anything by running them overinflated a few times. These things are dumb proof. Hookless rims are a little scarier though, because you know, design.
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Old 08-03-22, 10:39 AM
  #129  
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Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
Gotta love thread revives!

I never exceed the recommended pressure. It's almost always too high anyways...

Riding tubeless 28mms tires on hookless rims @ 68PSI rear & 65PSI front and I weigh 165lbs. I know I could go lower, but I find it's the sweet spot.

I doubt you'd damage anything by running them overinflated a few times. These things are dumb proof. Hookless rims are a little scarier though, because you know, design.
my tires normally inflated to 80psi front and back. however my front tire is 35mm and the back is 32mm; my question is: should i keep my fatter tire on the front of the bike for a better comfy ride and steering, while leaving the 32mm on the back? my bicycle is a Fuji Touring with a 3x9 gearing.

thanks.
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Old 08-04-22, 08:01 AM
  #130  
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Not sure why you have the wider tire in front. It's usually the opposite (aerodynamics). If you are looking for comfort, it's the rear one that should be wider. The front tire is always getting less load than the rear one.
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Old 08-04-22, 08:40 AM
  #131  
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Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
Not sure why you have the wider tire in front. It's usually the opposite (aerodynamics). If you are looking for comfort, it's the rear one that should be wider. The front tire is always getting less load than the rear one.
For gravel and MTB, it's not uncommon for people to put a wider tire up front for grip and handling. At least that's my understanding - I'm too persnickety to have mismatching tires.
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