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First road bike under $1500

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Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

First road bike under $1500

Old 03-24-20, 03:27 AM
  #26  
HTupolev
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Originally Posted by ChrisAlbertson View Post
A good road bike is a special-purpose machine for going fast on paved roads.
No it isn't. A road bike is a special-purpose machine for road cycling, and for road racing.

If you want to go fast on paved roads, get a TT/Tri bike or a performance-oriented recumbent. Either option can give you a couple mph over a typical road fit.

Actually, I take that back. If your priority is to go fast on paved roads, get a car or a motorcycle.
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Old 03-24-20, 08:13 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by ChrisAlbertson View Post
Why are people saying to buy a bike with 32mm tires when the OP already has a really nice hybrid bike that could be used for gravel roads and such.

No matter what people say about big tires and comfort, When you have 100+ PSI in small tires the bike will roll really fast if the pavement is smooth. If you have good roads that are well surfaced then you can bump the pressure way up and you w;il go noticeably faster. So listen to advice on tires but ALSO look at where you intend to ride.
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Old 03-24-20, 09:03 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by ChrisAlbertson View Post
Why are people saying to buy a bike with 32mm tires when the OP already has a really nice hybrid bike that could be used for gravel roads and such. He said he wants a "road bike" and we assume he keeps the hybrid.

A good road bike is a special-purpose machine for going fast on paved roads. Some people who have only one bike might want to compromise but if you can have 2 or 3 bikes there is no need to. The handeing, rolling resistance and gearing on a road bike is not the same as what you would want for riding on a back-country semi-paved road. Road bike go fast. Even me, who is slow will easly get up over 25 mph on down grades. Handeling and "aero" begines to matters at 20 mph.

Hopefully after you have a proper road bike you get hooked and start doing 4 hour then later all day rides and cover some miles. You will find that you go way-faster with your upper body ducked to the wind but you may or may not be able to put up with an agressive aerodynamic riding position. I would figure that out FIRST before buying a road bike. RENT a race bike for the day. Make a mini-vacation out of it some place where you can ride 50 or so more miles over varied roads. Then you will know if you can stand riding one. ALL bike feel good durring a 5 minute tet ride. See what your neck and shoulders say after 4 or 5 hours. You just might like it, or not.

No matter what people say about big tires and comfort, When you have 100+ PSI in small tires the bike will roll really fast if the pavement is smooth. If you have good roads that are well surfaced then you can bump the pressure way up and you wil go noticably faster. So listen to advice on tires but ALSO look at where you itend to ride.

Look at used bikes. It is much harder but even a nice high-end used race bike sell for half the new price or less. If you like your Cannondale, then look for a used CADD10 or CAAD12
People recommend 32mm tire clearance because the tire size printed on the sidewall doesn't really have any bearing on the actual inflated size of the tire. A Vittoria Roubaix 25mm on an old Mavic Open Pro rim might come in at about 25-26mm wide, but a Continental GranPrix 4000s II in 28mm, on a modern, wider rim, will balloon out to about 32mm. Now, manufacturers don't take that 'ballooning' into account, and when they list tire clearance, they list actual width - in which case, a frame that lists a 28mm clearance would have trouble clearing the Continental.

I can tell you that I have firsthand experience, as my Lynskey is listed as supporting 28mm tires, but wasn't able to properly clear the Continental UltraSport 28mm tires that it shipped with. The 2mm of clearance at the chainstays was fine when the bike was standing still, but in harder efforts, the frame flexed enough that the tire rubbed on the chainstay, robbing power. I switched out to a 25mm Gran Prix, and immediately saved 10 minutes on a 50mi ride.

So no, people don't need to run 32mm tires to brush up against the limits of a 32mm frame.
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Old 03-24-20, 09:05 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by InvertedMP View Post
Not interested in competing or doing anything crazy. I would love to buy something I could modify and upgrade in the future, but that is a decent base to start with. What should I be looking at?
Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
I agree noodle soup

I donít want to start yet another tire size war. But 2 things stick out for me from OPís request: 1) heís not racing, which implies to me that comfort and fun are more important than outright performance and 2) he wants something worth upgrading in the future, which implies he wants something at least somewhat futureproof.

This makes the decision a bit easier: get something with disc brakes, and at least 30mm stated tire clearance. I would recommend more. 28mm stated clearance is dead on arrival.

The Contend AR, as someone suggested, seems great.

Iíve heard good things about the Canyon Endurace, but youíll have to stretch even for their aluminum frames: https://www.canyon.com/en-us/road-bi...=BK&quantity=1

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribbl...e-shimano-105/

^The ribble R872 and the canyon are both on the endurance-racing side of geometry, which is to say that they will suit a strong, aggressive rider without breaking your back.
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Old 03-27-20, 11:56 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by aliasfox View Post
I can tell you that I have firsthand experience, as my Lynskey is listed as supporting 28mm tires, but wasn't able to properly clear the Continental UltraSport 28mm tires that it shipped with. The 2mm of clearance at the chainstays was fine when the bike was standing still, but in harder efforts, the frame flexed enough that the tire rubbed on the chainstay, robbing power. I switched out to a 25mm Gran Prix, and immediately saved 10 minutes on a 50mi ride.
That's a huge bummer. Don't know what model Lynskey you got, but I know they've been trending with at least some of their models towards wider and wider tire support. My 2018 R260 has plenty of room in the chainstays for very wide tires, and I had them swap the traditional road fork they were going to use on it for their gravel fork, with the result that my bike has so much clearance fore and aft with my 32mm tires that I'm considering ordering some 35mm tires to try out, and could go to 38 or possibly larger if I felt the desire to.

So no, people don't need to run 32mm tires to brush up against the limits of a 32mm frame.
Truth. The Conti GP4K tires I've used a lot in the past were notorious for this, with my 25mm versions always measuring out at like 28+ in real life, and the 28s measuring over 30.

I'm happy to see bike manufacturers responding to the trend towards wider tire support. I so badly wanted to run GP4K 28s on my old Trek, and actually did run them for a time, but the 1mm or so of clearance in the fork just wasn't cutting it, so I had to back down to 25s in the front. I disliked being limited there, hence the swap to the gravel fork when I ordered the Lynskey.
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Old 03-27-20, 12:21 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by noodle soup View Post
+1

Bikesdirect has some great values. I like this one https://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...e-xx.htm#specs
Great spec at a great price.
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Old 03-27-20, 12:26 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
That's a huge bummer. Don't know what model Lynskey you got, but I know they've been trending with at least some of their models towards wider and wider tire support. My 2018 R260 has plenty of room in the chainstays for very wide tires, and I had them swap the traditional road fork they were going to use on it for their gravel fork, with the result that my bike has so much clearance fore and aft with my 32mm tires that I'm considering ordering some 35mm tires to try out, and could go to 38 or possibly larger if I felt the desire to.


Truth. The Conti GP4K tires I've used a lot in the past were notorious for this, with my 25mm versions always measuring out at like 28+ in real life, and the 28s measuring over 30.

I'm happy to see bike manufacturers responding to the trend towards wider tire support. I so badly wanted to run GP4K 28s on my old Trek, and actually did run them for a time, but the 1mm or so of clearance in the fork just wasn't cutting it, so I had to back down to 25s in the front. I disliked being limited there, hence the swap to the gravel fork when I ordered the Lynskey.
Interesting. I'm on a 2019 Lynskey R270 disc. The attached picture is with a GP4k 25mm, with the Vision Team 30 wheels (original equipment). With the UltraSport 28mm tires, the gap was quite a bit smaller.



Was considering going in on one of their clearance R270 (rim brake) framesets when they still had a few in stock in my size, but the listed 25mm of clearance probably means that I'd be going back to 23mm tires.
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Old 03-27-20, 01:13 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by aliasfox View Post
Interesting. I'm on a 2019 Lynskey R270 disc. The attached picture is with a GP4k 25mm, with the Vision Team 30 wheels (original equipment). With the UltraSport 28mm tires, the gap was quite a bit smaller.



Was considering going in on one of their clearance R270 (rim brake) framesets when they still had a few in stock in my size, but the listed 25mm of clearance probably means that I'd be going back to 23mm tires.
Ok this is quite shocking to me, since the R270 was just supposed to be an incremental improvement over the R260 that I got. My chainstays look totally different though. Check this out. This is with my 32mm Compass tires mounted. There's tons of space there.


Here's the space around the seat stays:


And here's the ginormous space due to them using their gravel fork on my bike instead of the default road fork:


I wanted durability and flexibility on this bike, and got it in spades, with no regrets. Pure roadies might be appalled at that fork, but I'm happy as a clam with it. I'm a clydesdale, so though I'm also a roadie, I'm on the unconventional side, and this bike is optimized for me, not some 150-lb beanpole.
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Old 03-27-20, 01:22 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
Ok this is quite shocking to me, since the R270 was just supposed to be an incremental improvement over the R260 that I got. My chainstays look totally different though. Check this out. This is with my 32mm Compass tires mounted. There's tons of space there.


Here's the space around the seat stays:


And here's the ginormous space due to them using their gravel fork on my bike instead of the default road fork:


I wanted durability and flexibility on this bike, and got it in spades, with no regrets. Pure roadies might be appalled at that fork, but I'm happy as a clam with it. I'm a clydesdale, so though I'm also a roadie, I'm on the unconventional side, and this bike is optimized for me, not some 150-lb beanpole.
Your chainstays definitely have much more of an "S" bend to them - they flare out further by the BB, only to tuck in for crank-arm clearance. It looks like the R270's stays are much straighter from BB to dropout (or brake mount, as it were). I wonder if there was any reason for the design change (aside from maybe cost savings).

Mind you, she rides gloriously, and I'm only slightly annoyed that I had to grab her a new tire shortly after discovering this (maybe about a month and a half into ownership). Would've just preferred that she was advertised as having clearance for 25mm tires.
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Old 03-27-20, 01:43 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by InvertedMP View Post
So I have a hybrid that I love (Cídale Quick 5) and I am looking at getting my first road bike. Not interested in competing or doing anything crazy. I would love to buy something I could modify and upgrade in the future, but that is a decent base to start with. What should I be looking at?
I had an old Cannondale R900 (oversized for me) and rugged aluminum for years. I upgraded to a 2015 Specialized Roubaix (pre future-shock frame) - and the bike is a dream. Full Carbon. I am actually selling the bike...

The Roubaix has a more relaxed geo and just keeps rolling. What size are you?
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Old 03-27-20, 02:18 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by aliasfox View Post
Your chainstays definitely have much more of an "S" bend to them - they flare out further by the BB, only to tuck in for crank-arm clearance. It looks like the R270's stays are much straighter from BB to dropout (or brake mount, as it were). I wonder if there was any reason for the design change (aside from maybe cost savings).
No idea on the change, since I see the change from what I got to what you got as a bit of a regression. I will say the first bend in the chainstay that gives me more room around the tires is awesome. The second bend toward the brake mount/dropout happened a little too soon. They could have carried it back a little further before the bend. When I first got the bike I had my left heel bump up against the chainstay where it bends back out a few times. I adjusted the positioning of my cleats a little and it hasn't been a problem since, but with my size 13 feet they definitely cut that a little close.

Mind you, she rides gloriously, and I'm only slightly annoyed that I had to grab her a new tire shortly after discovering this (maybe about a month and a half into ownership). Would've just preferred that she was advertised as having clearance for 25mm tires.
I'm glad you're loving it. Tire clearance was prominent in my list of requirements when I ordered this bike, so I made sure, and double-checked, that I'd have plenty of it before I pulled the trigger. I'd say I ended up with just about the perfect clyde bike if money is no object, since it's about as good as it's possible to be while also being good for a guy like me.
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Old 03-27-20, 08:27 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by SethAZ View Post
Because 32mm is quite awesome on a road bike. I've got them on mine, and it's not meant as a gravel bike at all, though it would be fine I suppose with different tires. There are some really great road tires in that size that feel and handle great, and on normal, non-perfect pavement don't cost any performance worth even thinking about. They are from Compass (now Rene Herse), have a very supple casing, weight just barely more than a normal 28mm, and the road feel with it's dampening due to lower pressure are fantastic. This isn't confirmation bias; at the time I switched to the 32mm tires I had dozens of rides on a certain 32-mile route I did a lot on my 25 and 28mm tires, and further rides with the 32mm tires showed no loss of performance; if anything, I sped up. These were recorded rides reviewed on Strava, with actual performance data attached.


And this is yet one more reason to ride a good quality 32mm tire on the road bike if it will fit. The ride is smoother, less vibration, and for those really long rides like you suggest it actually matters. For one it's less fatiguing.


If one rides on purely pristine virgin asphalt roads then OK, but on normal roads in the real world those narrower tires with the higher pressure will jiggle you, the rider, more. Every joule of energy that it takes to jiggle you and the bike had to come from your legs. It's known as suspension losses. The lower-pressure, wider tire jiggles you and the bike less, so you lose less energy on less-than-perfect road surfaces.

There are several short stretches of road that I ride on often that are obscenely bad, as in massive cracks that gape multiple inches apart, and lots of road surface where the asphalt is cracked and broken but the chunks are still there, so its uber rough. On my 25mm tires I had to slow down noticeably on that road. With the 32mm tires I can ride more or less at full speed, so large is the difference in how the bike (and my butt) react to the rough road surface. Btw, I am a very heavy cyclist (well into the clydesdale category), and I ride my 32mm tires at 90psi rear and 85psi front. Lighter people get away with substantially less than that.
You said "Clydesdale" and I think this explains it. Silica the people who make the pumps did some research into what tire pressure is fastest and it depends on the road. Lower pressures it turns out are faster on bumpy roads. So let's say you find that 90 PSI is best for some road. Next, we have to look at the rider. What you want is a certain size contact patch of rubber. It needs to be short. So given that 90 is the best PSI you can adjust the rest by picking a tire size to match the rider's weight. So the "Clydesdale" gets good performance on 32mm tires but perhaps the 110-pound female rider is maybe best to use 80 PSI in 23mm tires.

They did quite a lot of research and tire width and PSI seems to depend on speed and the road and the weight of the rider. In the case quoted above, yes even a 40 mm tire might even be best but not if you are smaller and faster and on a better road.

But not many of us can afford to have a whole rack of wheels with all different kinds of tires then have an expert from Silca examine the road and recommend a tire and wheel for us. As it turns out the depth of the aero wheel that is best depends on the wind direction and speed. Obviously disk wheels are bad in the strong crosswid. but there is a wide range to consider. So ideally you own a full set the different aero wheels at different widths and depths. This likey matters at the elite level where races are won by seconds.

OK, my point is that there is no "best" but only the best fit to the situation. Doing this fit in an optimal manner might be the next big thing. Certainly, the people selling wheels and tire would hope so.
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