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Campy Eurus or Fulcrum Racing 1's

Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Campy Eurus or Fulcrum Racing 1's

Old 07-06-05, 08:14 PM
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Campy Eurus or Fulcrum Racing 1's

I asked your opinions of Eurus vs. Mavic SL and I decided that I'd go Campy for a number of reasons. Now, I see these Fulcrums and they got me intrigued.

The wheel sets are about the same weight: Eurus = 1560gr, F1's = 1570gr

The Eurus are about $300 less.

Any opinions are welcome. Thanks
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Old 07-06-05, 10:40 PM
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Fulcrum is owned by Campy ... so either way, you're buying a Campy wheelset
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Old 07-07-05, 01:38 AM
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fulcrum is campy's answer to ksyriums, I would go with the eurus

if you're a bleeding edge/early adopter type, or just looking for something different, then the fulcrums are good as well

good luck
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Old 07-07-05, 05:14 AM
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I have the '02/'03 Zondas, which are nearly identical to the Euruses, at least the rear wheel is except for the steel pawl. They're great wheels, but the only complaint I have with them is the same as with almost every other wheelset: the rear can be seen to be out of balance when it's spun up to high speed in the big ring. I've heard the same thing from a friend who owns Eurus'. They're not terribly out of balance, but it is easily noticeable.

The Fulcrums supposedly correct that with their rim machining to make the wheels balanced. I'm surprised that no one has really thought of that before as a selling point.

OTOH, the Fulcrum rims are "only" 26mm in depth, so not much aero benefit there. Then again, who knows if the 30mm rim depth of Zonda/Eurus makes much difference?

I wish Campy/Fulcrum would have had a more unique design in the case of the Racing 1, instead of a rip-off of the K's. But they have to consider market forces, and what will sell the best.
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Old 07-07-05, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Wurm
OTOH, the Fulcrum rims are "only" 26mm in depth, so not much aero benefit there. Then again, who knows if the 30mm rim depth of Zonda/Eurus makes much difference?
Unless I'm consistently fooling myself, I do believe my Eurus wheels to give me a noticeable aero advantage compared to my old Cosmos. I can ride faster into headwinds, and it takes less effort to sprint up from say 25 to 30 mph. Downhill coasting speeds are also slightly increased. Whether this is because of the rim depth, the razor-blade-type spokes or the concealed design of the spoke nipples I have no idea.
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Old 07-07-05, 07:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Wurm
They're great wheels, but the only complaint I have with them is the same as with almost every other wheelset: the rear can be seen to be out of balance when it's spun up to high speed in the big ring. I've heard the same thing from a friend who owns Eurus'. They're not terribly out of balance, but it is easily noticeable.
Could you elabrate on this this wurm. I think I may be noticing this on my Eurus. I seem to have a hard time adjusting the derailluer. I get a slight rubbing noise in the small sprockets at faster speeds, yet it shifts flawlessly and I don't hear anything on the large sprockets.
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Old 07-07-05, 07:34 AM
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Originally Posted by BryanW
I can ride faster into headwinds, and it takes less effort to sprint up from say 25 to 30 mph. Downhill coasting speeds are also slightly increased. Whether this is because of the rim depth, the razor-blade-type spokes or the concealed design of the spoke nipples I have no idea.
I also feel that the Zonda/Eurus design works well aero-wise, but I'm just playing devil's advocate here. There are some who will say that aero bennies don't really come into play with a 30mm. wheel over a typical box-type rim; that you have to go to a deeper rim to see significant differences.

However, from my own 'unscientific/anecdotal' experience, I think the combination of factors as you said adds up to lower drag.
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Old 07-07-05, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by jitteringjr
Could you elabrate on this this wurm. I think I may be noticing this on my Eurus. I seem to have a hard time adjusting the derailluer. I get a slight rubbing noise in the small sprockets at faster speeds, yet it shifts flawlessly and I don't hear anything on the large sprockets.
Well, would not a rubbing sound be due to a slight misalignment somewhere, rather than radial balance being less than perfect? I don't notice a problem like yours because of wheel unbalance, but it's the "wheel hop" that you can see when you get the rear really moving.

It also changes somewhat when I change tires or tubes, sometimes it's a little worse, sometimes hardly there at all. Apparently, a particular tire will be weighted on one side that will help to balance out the wheel, and the next tire might not be. I've even been able to slide a tire around the rim until I've found a better balance point. It doesn't take much, usually just a few grams.

The main reason I bring it up is because I like to do mad descents, and if things are a bit out of whack at high speeds, it's noticeable. So I do as much to correct it as I can, for handling & safety reasons. It's not a problem on climbs or cruising speeds.
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Old 07-07-05, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Wurm
Well, would not a rubbing sound be due to a slight misalignment somewhere, rather that radial balance being less than perfect?
True. I just can't seem to pinpoint it though. Like I said it shifts very smoothly across all the sprockets and it only causes noise in the small sprokets at high speed. When I pedal slowly in the small sprockets, I can't hear anything. I'll do more tweaking.

I don't notice any of the symptoms you mentioned. Then again, it may be that I can't get the 'rear really moving'.
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Old 07-07-05, 08:00 AM
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I have noticed from working on Campy drivetrains that the best place to start is to set the limits for R derailleur travel first, and you need to get the chain shifting onto the end cogs properly before you start with indexing the inner gears.

Once the chain's aligned properly on both of the end cogs, you need to shift onto the smallest cassette cog and adjust the cable tension. Also set the barrel adjuster on the downtube and the R derailleur one in the middle of their adjustment range as well now.

Now pull on the cable by the middle of the down tube, it should have a small bit of tension to it; if the R derailleur moves as soon as you begin to pull on it, its tension is too tight, if you have to pull it more than an extra inch from the downtube, its too long.

Its best to try to set it as close to this following position with the pinch bolt on the derailleur now.

The desired tension result is that the first 'click' on the Ergo lever moves the chain to the next inner cog perfectly centered, as long as this happens I have found that the rest are sure to line up, but a half turn on the R derailleur adjuster may be needed once you start changing the gears and checking the indexing up and down a few times.

If you have deviated far from this procedure, you are going to be off on the cables tension setting and the indexing will not be correct. Also, never cut the piece of cable housing designed for the R derailleur, its been as close to the correct length for as long as I can remember, and shortening it only creates shifting problems.
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Old 07-07-05, 02:29 PM
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What metal are the spokes made of on the Eurus?
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Old 07-07-05, 04:11 PM
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Acciaio.
Acero.
Acier.
Staal.
Steel.
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