Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Bike fitting

Old 07-06-05, 08:50 PM
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sparknote_s
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Bike fitting

Could somebody give me an in depth explanation on why it is a good idea to get fit on your bike from a shop, or somebody experienced versus using online forumulas? My parents are skeptical, thinking people foolishly pay people to do this for them, when online formulas or self guess-fit is fine. Perhaps it is? If not, why not? And this would be for somebody with no experience in road riding, or very little (few months). Not somebody with lots of experience riding.

Thanks.
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Old 07-06-05, 08:56 PM
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Smoothie104
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Tough to say, becuase I see a lot of people pay for the fit, and they are set up all wrong for the type of riding they want to do. It depends who you are dealing with.
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Old 07-06-05, 09:03 PM
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sparknote_s
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Well it's a shop that charges $50/hr and puts your bike on a trainer. And it'd be a racing fit. The shop has fast group rides and sponsors some teams, so must be somewhat in the racing loop.
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Old 07-06-05, 09:09 PM
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Originally Posted by sparknote_s
Well it's a shop that charges $50/hr and puts your bike on a trainer. And it'd be a racing fit. The shop has fast group rides and sponsors some teams, so must be somewhat in the racing loop.
Is it a Serotta-certified fit? Only one worth beans IMO....

Cole
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Old 07-06-05, 09:17 PM
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zero
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I got my new bike professionally fit for racing. I didn't think it would help as much as it did. The saddle position made the surface pressure even over the entire saddle and it improved my pedal stroke. He nailed the cleat position, it couldn't be better. The fit also balanced me on the bike so that when on the tops of the bars there is no weight being put on my hands and on the hoods and drops theres only a few pounds of pressure.
The fit made me much more comfortable and the pedal stroke defidently improved my performance.
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Old 07-06-05, 09:22 PM
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johnny99
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A good pro fit will include:
1. interview the rider about riding style, prefered riding position, fitness level, past injuries, cycling goals, etc.
2. initial fit is based on current fit plus various standard measurements and interview results
3. watch the person ride the bike, either on a trainer or on the road (may involve videotaping)
4. make adjustments to take all the wobbles and inefficiencies out of the cycling motion
5. repeat 3-4 several times, possibly on different days and over different terrain
6. coach the rider on improvements to riding position and cycling motion
7. record the fit parameters so they can be used on other bikes

Time is 1-5 hours total. Price is $50 to $500, depending on amount of time, technical skill of the fitter, and equipment that is used.

Is it worth it? That depends on how good is your current fit. If you are happy with your current setup, then you may be skeptical of any changes, especially if you're paying a lot of money.

If you are experiencing stress or repetitive use injuries, then a good pro fit is definately worth the money. $500 doesn't go very far in the operating room these days.
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Old 07-06-05, 09:31 PM
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sparknote_s
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Well the thing is I don't know where I should have the steer tube cut.
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Old 07-06-05, 09:37 PM
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Originally Posted by johnny99
A good pro fit will include:
1. interview the rider about riding style, prefered riding position, fitness level, past injuries, cycling goals, etc.
2. initial fit is based on current fit plus various standard measurements and interview results
3. watch the person ride the bike, either on a trainer or on the road (may involve videotaping)
4. make adjustments to take all the wobbles and inefficiencies out of the cycling motion
5. repeat 3-4 several times, possibly on different days and over different terrain
6. coach the rider on improvements to riding position and cycling motion
7. record the fit parameters so they can be used on other bikes

Time is 1-5 hours total. Price is $50 to $500, depending on amount of time, technical skill of the fitter, and equipment that is used.
Word..
Mine took 2 hrs, cost 60 bucks.. Learned a heckuva lot.. The guy Pointed out a potential difference in leg lengths and other suggestions on improving pedal stroke... I have enough parameters to fit my next bike myself..
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Old 07-06-05, 09:42 PM
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My LBS is a wizard with bike fit.
He took the time to look at my shoes to see how they were wearing in.
Never would have read that on-line, nor would I have been able to interpret it.

Then again, some LBSs just go through the motions based on what THEY read on-line, and charge top dollar for it.

I'd send you to my LBS in Clarkston, Michigan. But I doubt you'd go.
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Old 07-06-05, 09:50 PM
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Your parents have no clues. Divorce them NOW
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Old 07-07-05, 03:27 AM
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A good bike fit is a must if more than just an occassional rider. I had always thought it was a waste until I got one done. What a difference. Online fit calcualtors are nice but nothing like someone taking everything you want into consideration. Good Luck.
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Old 07-07-05, 03:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Smoothie104
Tough to say, becuase I see a lot of people pay for the fit, and they are set up all wrong for the type of riding they want to do. It depends who you are dealing with.
THe thing is the fit is geared towards "position". What if you don't like that position?

What bothers me about some of these fit schools is they try to lock you into adopting KOPS. What if you don't want that position? Are they equipped and knowledgeable to help you switch to something else?
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Old 07-07-05, 06:28 AM
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Online calculators will help you narrow down the size of the bike, but not how well the bike is adjusted to your particular physiology. Even an experienced cyclist can benefit from the most basic "included with purchase" fitting, as long as the fitter is properly ceertified and knows what questions to ask.
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Old 07-07-05, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by 53-11_alltheway
THe thing is the fit is geared towards "position". What if you don't like that position?

What bothers me about some of these fit schools is they try to lock you into adopting KOPS. What if you don't want that position? Are they equipped and knowledgeable to help you switch to something else?
if they're worth their salt, they'll discuss KOPS 'till the geek in you
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Old 07-07-05, 12:01 PM
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FWIW, my wife had knee and ankle problems with a bike purchased from a Trek store. The bike felt fine on medium rides, but the problems developed after a couple days into a multiday ride.

While shopping for a new bike, Richard Schwinn at the Waterford plant (yes, that Schwinn) suggested our LBS for a bike fit to size a new Waterford. Since then, she is faster and much more comfortable on multiday rides.

YMMV, but a fit for my wife was worth 10 times what we paid. We didnít try the online fit calculators, but Iím suspicious of something that leaves out many variables such as flexibility, body structure, riding style, etc.

The problem is finding a reputable fitter. Talk to some people who have received a fit from your LBS to get their opinions.

-murray
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Old 07-07-05, 03:22 PM
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Ostuni
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after reading johnny99's post above, in hindsight it sounds like my lbs did a good job of fitting me before/during/after sale... not quite to johnny99's detail and thoroughness, but close, and for free...
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