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Replacing Cassette... Should I buy a new chain too?

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Replacing Cassette... Should I buy a new chain too?

Old 04-10-20, 12:47 PM
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Metallifan33
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Replacing Cassette... Should I buy a new chain too?

Cassette - Shimano 105 HG700-11, 11-34
Chain - Shimano 105 HG601, 11 speed

So I'm taking my bike in for it's first service. It has approx 1,000 miles on it and hasn't been cleaned (besides me wiping down the frame from time to time).
I have a used Tacx Neo trainer that I'm setting up (in preparation for summer), and need a cassette for it. I figure I'll just put the new cassette on the bike and the old one on the trainer.
Should I go ahead and pick up a new chain too?
I heard that heavier people strain their chain more (I was 190ish lbs when I started riding in January and am 175 now)... I figure I strain the chain more than the average person due to my weight.
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Old 04-10-20, 01:03 PM
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WhyFi
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Your chain should last you at least twice as long. Pick up a chain stretch tool to periodically check wear, even if it's just a simple one like this -

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Old 04-10-20, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Your chain should last you at least twice as long. Pick up a chain stretch tool to periodically check wear.
Cool Thanks. I'll check it out.
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Old 04-10-20, 01:06 PM
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What WhyFi wrote. I'm going to start saying, "Hey, don't strain your chain" to people when they'e annoyed with me.
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Old 04-10-20, 01:43 PM
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Sure.. pick up a new chain and install it. Chains are consumables so no harm done buying one. Just keep the old one too, as it has a good amount of life left in it.
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Old 04-10-20, 01:59 PM
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Yeah man buy a new chain, to me they’re cheap.

Get a Dura Ace one while you’re at it. Gotta have at least one DA component on there.

Change your bar tape (and wrap it yourself). That’s cheap (relatively) as well and is fun. Makes the bike feel new again.

I really like Supacaz but also use Zipp Service Course CX quite a bit too.

Have fun! I (probably wrongly) think bikes are supposed to be fun.

Or perhaps fun for you might be smugly talking about how long you can make things last. Or sneering at people who spend (more than you think they should) on bike stuff. Perhaps condescension and smirkey know-it all contempt makes your special purpose tingle so that might be your idea of a good time.

At any rate...Enjoy.

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Old 04-10-20, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
Cassette - Shimano 105 HG700-11, 11-34
Chain - Shimano 105 HG601, 11 speed

So I'm taking my bike in for it's first service. It has approx 1,000 miles on it and hasn't been cleaned (besides me wiping down the frame from time to time).
I have a used Tacx Neo trainer that I'm setting up (in preparation for summer), and need a cassette for it. I figure I'll just put the new cassette on the bike and the old one on the trainer.
Should I go ahead and pick up a new chain too?
I heard that heavier people strain their chain more (I was 190ish lbs when I started riding in January and am 175 now)... I figure I strain the chain more than the average person due to my weight.
It is highly unlikely you have any significant wear on your cassette after only 1,000 miles. Unless they were really hard TT speed of hard climbing miles and you didn't lube your chain.

But whenever you change your cassette ALWAYS install a new chain. Stretched chains wear out cassettes posthaste. Since a good chain is fairly cheap compared to a cassette you don't want to start off on the wrong foot.
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Old 04-11-20, 03:48 AM
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Unless you're going to be climbing hills while riding your trainer you'll be better off with a narrow range cassette (like 12-25).
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Old 04-11-20, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by RiceAWay View Post
But whenever you change your cassette ALWAYS install a new chain. Stretched chains wear out cassettes posthaste. Since a good chain is fairly cheap compared to a cassette you don't want to start off on the wrong foot.
He's going to be running both the old and the new cassette. One on the Tacx, one on the rear wheel.
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Old 04-11-20, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
I heard that heavier people strain their chain more (I was 190ish lbs when I started riding in January and am 175 now)... I figure I strain the chain more than the average person due to my weight.
Chains care about watts, not weight.

Well, more specifically, torque on the crank arms.
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Old 04-11-20, 05:09 PM
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I love how 190 or 170 is heavy on a bike forum. The average American woman is 170 lbs..... Americans are large
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Old 04-11-20, 05:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Tacoenthusiast View Post
I love how 190 or 170 is heavy on a bike forum. The average American woman is 170 lbs..... Americans are large
That's so absurd that I had to look it up.

Hoe.

Lee.

****.

It's true. It's true.
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Old 04-11-20, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Tacoenthusiast View Post
Americans are fat
Oh, and FIFY.
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Old 04-14-20, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Your chain should last you at least twice as long. Pick up a chain stretch tool to periodically check wear, even if it's just a simple one like this -
Don't because that doesn't account for initial roller clearance and wear which doesn't effect pitch and therefore cog wear.

Use a $1 12" ruler. Replace when the same point on pins which should be 11" apart reaches 11 1/16" or front shifts get sluggish from side plate clearance.
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Old 04-14-20, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
That's so absurd that I had to look it up.

Hoe.

Lee.

****.

It's true. It's true.
Jeebus zebus.
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Old 04-14-20, 05:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Tacoenthusiast View Post
I love how 190 or 170 is heavy on a bike forum. The average American woman is 170 lbs..... Americans are large
Bike racer fat is normal people skinny.
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Old 04-14-20, 05:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt View Post
Don't because that doesn't account for initial roller clearance and wear which doesn't effect pitch and therefore cog wear.

Use a $1 12" ruler. Replace when the same point on pins which should be 11" apart reaches 11 1/16" or front shifts get sluggish from side plate clearance.
I'm aware that the gauge that I posted isn't ideal but it's cheap, it's easy and it's not ambiguous. I trust that it'll actually get used, moreso than I trust the average person to dig out a ruler, properly align it with their grimy chain and read it accurately.
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Old 04-14-20, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
Jeebus zebus.
Don't let anyone tell you that you're an average girl, Hummer.
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Old 04-15-20, 04:51 AM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Don't let anyone tell you that you're an average girl, Hummer.
With no racing on the horizon I've let myself go all the way to 173, so I guess that would make me above average.

Now that FTP though...
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Old 04-15-20, 04:53 AM
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Also, it's funny that in Pnoenix apparently people have to get their trainers set up for summer.

Summer is coming.
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Old 04-15-20, 06:31 AM
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Personally, I would buy a new chain with the cassette, but not install it unless I experienced skipping when using the old chain on the new cassette.

When I get a new cassette, I usually buy 3 chains, and swap them out every 1,000 miles or so in order to maximize cassette life. I get at least 2 uses, usually 3, out of each chain, so a cassette lasts me 6k - 9k mi. The disadvantage, of course, is that this also wears out the chainrings, so I have to replace them too. Chainrings are cheaper than cassettes, though, so to me it is worth it to use the cassette longer and swap out the whole drivetrain at once - cassette, rings and chain(s).

Also, since the drivetrain is off the bike, I might as well clean it, look at the brake pads, cables/housing, bar tape, wheel bearings ....
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Old 04-15-20, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Bah Humbug View Post
Also, it's funny that in Pnoenix apparently people have to get their trainers set up for summer.

Summer is coming.
lol yeah. Also our toilets swirl in the opposite direction when you flush them, and the law requires you to carry a gun while you ride.
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Old 04-15-20, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
Cassette - Shimano 105 HG700-11, 11-34
Chain - Shimano 105 HG601, 11 speed

So I'm taking my bike in for it's first service. It has approx 1,000 miles on it and hasn't been cleaned (besides me wiping down the frame from time to time).
I have a used Tacx Neo trainer that I'm setting up (in preparation for summer), and need a cassette for it. I figure I'll just put the new cassette on the bike and the old one on the trainer.
Should I go ahead and pick up a new chain too?
I heard that heavier people strain their chain more (I was 190ish lbs when I started riding in January and am 175 now)... I figure I strain the chain more than the average person due to my weight.
1000 miles? I don't believe it's enough to warrant swapping chain. I'd measure the chain stretch first but it should pretty close to new unless you managed to produce enough watts in your last 1000miles to stretch it, which would be insane (and very cool!).

A heavier rider will stretch its chain more rapidly for sure as more effort (wattage) is required to move forward than a lighter rider, but to what extent? I'm not sure.
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Old 04-15-20, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
1000 miles? I don't believe it's enough to warrant swapping chain. I'd measure the chain stretch first but it should pretty close to new unless you managed to produce enough watts in your last 1000miles to stretch it, which would be insane (and very cool!).

A heavier rider will stretch its chain more rapidly for sure as more effort (wattage) is required to move forward than a lighter rider, but to what extent? I'm not sure.
I've worn out a chain in about 1500 miles, so it's not all about pounds and watts.

A fresh chain is always a good idea with a new cassette.
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