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Anybody in here over suppinate?

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Anybody in here over suppinate?

Old 05-15-20, 09:34 PM
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Seattle Forrest
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Anybody in here over suppinate?

I do it walking, and on the bike most of my pedaling force comes through the outside edge of my foot.

If so I'm wondering if you've found a shoe that works for you?

I have insoles that are made for this and a good podiatrist who's ready to help me customize them, I'd like to find a better shoe as a starting point.

Thanks.
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Old 05-15-20, 10:21 PM
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If they do, I’m pretty sure they don’t talk about it.
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Old 05-15-20, 10:33 PM
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I do. I put two 1.5˚ Bikefit Insole Wedges in each of my shoes. They go under the forefoot. Works for me.
Actually I overpronate, but the result is the same since I end up weighting the outsides of the feet (if not, they just roll to the inside). Same fix I'd imagine.

Last edited by sfrider; 05-15-20 at 10:46 PM.
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Old 05-15-20, 10:34 PM
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I have the opposite problem.

cleat wedges are sometimes used, Would wider Q-factor and/or longer pedal spindles help?


Edit: sfrider beat me to the wedge suggestion.
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Old 05-15-20, 11:07 PM
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Thanks for the wedge suggestion, I'm about to try it!

I think widening my Q factor would help too. My pedals (Vectors) say my "platform center offset" is typically 1 to 2 cm. I don't know if I can widen them and keep my pedals?

I injured my feet and ankles badly last summer in an accident, I've only healed enough to start riding again a few weeks ago. It's the peroneus brevis from the little toe through the outside of the foot and into the ankle, I need to keep the pressure off to finish healing.
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Old 05-15-20, 11:36 PM
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I over supperate, which is the key to most of my weight problems, and the only way my cycling shoes can help with this is if I use them more.

ps: I had to look up over suppination. Unless Garmin sells different length axles I'd doubt you'll be able to change the alter the Q factor that way. Is there any way you could possibly improve things by adjusting the cleats a little left or right?
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Old 05-15-20, 11:53 PM
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I have a mild case of it (you can tell by looking at the soles of my shoes), but I use the cleat wedges and they seem to help even out the foot pressure.

EDIT: https://www.bikefit.com/p-3-8-pack-m...at-wedges.aspx
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Old 05-16-20, 12:37 AM
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I have the same issue. It’s excruciatingly painful. I used to run my cleats wide (wider q Factor) and thought that was a good solution. But my right knee would always ominously ache after a long, hard ride.

Putting 2 1 deg wedges under each cleat has made a world of difference to me. The key is to find a wedge angle that allows your knees to point forward (not bowed out) with uniform pressure on the base of your foot.

Don’t be shy with the wedges. You’ll know you’ve overwedged if your knees want to track outwards rather than inwards.
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Old 05-16-20, 01:50 AM
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The wedge shim may be the best start. I'm considering that for minor suppination and slightly shorter right leg (actually the same length as the left, but hip tilt from an old hip/lower back injury occasionally makes my cadence a bit choppy -- it looks fine to observers but I can feel that it's not quite right).

Shoes are so personal, I can only suggest what works for me. I have skinny (10.5 or 11 A or B), bony feet with high arches that are prone to spasms, and hotfoot from metatarsal pressure. Hard to find affordable specialty shoes. The discontinued Scott Road Pro work best for me -- I need to ask Scott whether they have another shoe built on the same last. The 2014 era Road Pro were basically like the lower part of Roman sandals with mesh fabric rather than open windows between the minimal leather. Fairly rigid sole, 7 on a scale of 10, with a metal mesh vent in the sole of the toe box. Really comfy in hot weather. Fits me so well I don't really need socks, but usually wear thin Hanes anklets from the dollar store, CVS or Walgreens.

I can make Fizik R5 Powerstrap Tempo shoes work but only with a custom insole and thicker socks. The width feels more like a C or D, which was fine in winter since there's plenty of room for layered socks or thick ski socks. But not my first choice.

And I had to replace the original insole. Both my Scott and Fizik shoes came with good insoles -- the Scott insoles have detachable smaller pads as well -- but they weren't quite right for me. I like ProFoot Miracle insoles. Really lightweight, comfortable and durable foam -- not gel. Hard to describe how good they are but it's worth risking $8-$10 for a set from Walgreen's or other store. Better than some custom and pricey orthotics I've had with other shoes.
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Old 05-16-20, 03:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
I do it walking, and on the bike most of my pedaling force comes through the outside edge of my foot.
If so I'm wondering if you've found a shoe that works for you?
I do - by quite a bit, to the point that i either need to turn my feet out quite a bit or bend my knees inwards in order to get all of my foot to exert pressure on the shoe.

My fitter's solution: cleat wedges. I got 3 wedges per foot and it has been fantastic.
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Old 05-16-20, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
Thanks for the wedge suggestion, I'm about to try it!

I think widening my Q factor would help too. My pedals (Vectors) say my "platform center offset" is typically 1 to 2 cm. I don't know if I can widen them and keep my pedals?
Pedal washers are cheap and easy to experiment with. I have 2 on one side and one on the other.

I injured my feet and ankles badly last summer in an accident, I've only healed enough to start riding again a few weeks ago. It's the peroneus brevis from the little toe through the outside of the foot and into the ankle, I need to keep the pressure off to finish healing.
Sorry to hear it. It can be a slow and frustrating process.

Steel is real (painful at times).

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Old 05-16-20, 11:11 AM
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After getting a pro fit, I ended up with some cleat wedges and longer spindles on my pedals.
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Old 05-16-20, 11:16 AM
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Take a look at Specialized shoes. They have that whole Body Geometry thing going on and I remember reading some of their info about they compensate for your condition slightly in their shoes because, according to Specialized, most people have that issue at some level.
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Old 05-16-20, 11:29 AM
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What might help is installing cranks that "bend out" away from the bottom bracket, rather than arms that plumb straight down. I was going to try that sometime and see if it helps.
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Old 05-16-20, 11:55 AM
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I really appreciate the advice. Thanks everyone!

It sounds like cleat wedges are very popular, I'll give them a try too.

For the record, off the bike I prefer minimalist zero drop shoes, and I've never had problems with my knees. I think they come in slightly when I ride.

I need to be up by Green Lake today, I'll stop at Gregg's while I'm there and see if they have Spesh shoes that night help me. The podiatrist can help with wedges and to shave or build up my insoles, that makes more sense if I bring the shoes I'm going to use them with.
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Old 05-16-20, 12:34 PM
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I bicycle because I over suppinate, lunchinate, brunchinate and breakfastate.
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Old 05-16-20, 03:51 PM
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Another wedge advocate here. My right knee flops to the inside and tends to brush the top tube which was cured with wedges. I also have very high arches and even with heat moldable foot beds there is space under the arches. I've filled in that space with foam between the foot bed and the shoe in addition to metatarsal pads under the mid foot. Furthermore, my left knee experiences some discomfort occasionally. My answer to this is knee exercises with lateral movements. Think of a basketball defender shuffling sideways while covering a drive toward the basket. This works for me immediately. You need to be creative about these things. I'm 81, no 82. Anyway so far I'm able to stave off these issues before they get worse.
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Old 05-16-20, 05:32 PM
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I used cleat wedges for many years and they worked well in general. They just have a propensity to want to shift around, especially for the wedge to move out. They collect dirt and grime. And screw lengths can become an issue - too short and it won't grip, too long and it extends into the footbed. I switched to insole wedges under the forefoot because they work just as well for me, without the fuss of cleat wedges. They work with any shoe, any cleat, no need for replacement screws or anything like that.
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Old 05-16-20, 07:29 PM
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I tried a cleat shim/wedge. I had to stop mid-ride to take it out, it hurt so much.

I think most other people have had neutral or positive experiences.
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Old 05-17-20, 12:02 PM
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Originally Posted by sfrider View Post
I do. I put two 1.5˚ Bikefit Insole Wedges in each of my shoes. They go under the forefoot. Works for me.
Actually I overpronate, but the result is the same since I end up weighting the outsides of the feet (if not, they just roll to the inside). Same fix I'd imagine.
There's a video on this page, about how misaligned feet can cause knee, back, and shoulder pain on the bike. It's obvious how that would work for the knees, what do you think about shoulders?
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Old 05-17-20, 01:13 PM
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Never noticed much anything in my shoulders. *shrug*
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Old 05-18-20, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
what do you think about shoulders?
My kid was just asking if a mis-aligned cleat could cause him shoulder pain (context is mountain biking -- he is fairly hard-core, unlike me). I speculated it could be due to compensation -- foot hurts more, you put more weight on your arms and shoulders or position yourself funny. I think he has a prior water-polo injury or sensitivity.

I don't think it is impossible, especially for cyclists who use their whole body (mtn > gravel > road).
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Old 05-18-20, 03:51 PM
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If you want to increase the Q factor, try something like these, only fify bucks

( pedal spacers ):
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Old 05-18-20, 04:59 PM
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Specialized used to sell them, I seem to recall:

https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2015/Pe...le-Components/
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Old 05-18-20, 05:37 PM
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I pulled the custom orthotics out of my ski boots I'm not using since moving to the desert, put them in my cycling shoes, and pretty much fixed all the nagging issues I had.
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