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When Changing a Back Tire

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When Changing a Back Tire

Old 06-08-20, 11:13 AM
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Metallifan33
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When Changing a Back Tire

... Do you stand next to the bike, or behind the bike (with the wheel between your knees)?
I have one bike and use it both on the trainer and outside, so I take the wheel off often.
It has disc brakes, and it's a pain to align everything while holding the RD open and putting the wheel on.
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Old 06-08-20, 12:07 PM
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Behind the bike, while it's in the repair stand.
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Old 06-08-20, 12:15 PM
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Are you shifting to the smallest cog before taking off/putting on the wheel?
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Old 06-08-20, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Are you shifting to the smallest cog before taking off/putting on the wheel?
Yeah. Big ring and small cog.
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Old 06-08-20, 01:39 PM
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Not turning your bike over is the thing to do if you are simply handing your bad wheel to someone and getting a replacement wheel in return. It can be much quicker once you learn to skillfully do the dance.

However for times when I have to fix the tire and put the same wheel back on, I'll turn the bike upside down. It's just so much more convenient for me and with the bikes I've had.

And yes, if you have difficulty, it probably is partly due to not shifting to the smallest cog prior to removing and then getting the chain onto that same cog when reinstalling.
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Old 06-08-20, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Rides4Beer View Post
Behind the bike, while it's in the repair stand.
Ah... I wish. My bike stand has an annoying spring that tensions one of the levers that hold it.
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Old 06-08-20, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
Yeah. Big ring and small cog.
Hmm. Well, usually, I'll just get the chain on to the small cog and then let go of the RD and it isn't a problem. I can see how the chain/RD tension can make things a pain to align, but once the chain is on the teeth, you can use both hands to align, one on the frame, one on the wheel (I usually like to hold the wheel up near, and pull it in to, the seat stay/seat tube junction).
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Old 06-08-20, 02:37 PM
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Vertical drop outs on your bike? The older more horizontal drop outs did seem to be more of a pain. Larger tires might have you bumping the seat tube and having to squeeze the axle around the end of the old style drop out.
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Old 06-08-20, 02:57 PM
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I shift into the smallest cog, and then stand behind the bike to remove the wheel. I usually ride in a group so there is always someone to hold the bike. When I am solo I lay it down on the non-drive side.
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Old 06-09-20, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by hrdknox1 View Post
I shift into the smallest cog, and then stand behind the bike to remove the wheel. I usually ride in a group so there is always someone to hold the bike. When I am solo I lay it down on the non-drive side.
You lay it down to put the wheel on? Interesting.
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Old 06-09-20, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Hmm. Well, usually, I'll just get the chain on to the small cog and then let go of the RD and it isn't a problem. I can see how the chain/RD tension can make things a pain to align, but once the chain is on the teeth, you can use both hands to align, one on the frame, one on the wheel (I usually like to hold the wheel up near, and pull it in to, the seat stay/seat tube junction).
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Vertical drop outs on your bike? The older more horizontal drop outs did seem to be more of a pain. Larger tires might have you bumping the seat tube and having to squeeze the axle around the end of the old style drop out.
Yeah, usually it's the brake disc that doesn't get aligned properly. I have one hand on the RD, the other holding the bike, so nothing left to keep the wheel/brake disc aligned. When I someone helps me, it's easy.
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Old 06-09-20, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
You lay it down to put the wheel on? Interesting.
No tricks up my sleeve....just an incomplete sentence....Lol!! The sentence should have ended with "after removing the wheel".
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Old 06-09-20, 01:15 PM
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Regardless of whether you hold the wheel between your knees or turn your bike upside down. It'll require a little practice to learn where to push on the DR and it's cage. Some DR's are just a little trickier and disc brakes and thru axles just add more to that learning curve. Me being used to a horizontal drop out and skewers am very clumsy mounting the rear tire on my new bike. But that'll change I'm sure.

If you are doing this at home and your stand doesn't work for you then you might do what I do for other types of bike maintenance and run a couple 2 x 4's through the rungs of a ladder and clamp them, then hang the bike on them. Or I have also just run the 2 x 4's over the edge of a kitchen counter or table, clamped them and hung the bike over them. If the bike moves too much, then secure it to the boards with an old inner tube or something.
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Old 06-09-20, 01:30 PM
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Shift to the smallest cog and stand the bike upside down, open the QR or TA, pull back on the DR and remove the wheel. Or the reverse. Standing the bike upside down is just MUCH easier and you get the wheel all the way in every time.
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Old 06-09-20, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Not turning your bike over is the thing to do if you are simply handing your bad wheel to someone and getting a replacement wheel in return. It can be much quicker once you learn to skillfully do the dance.

However for times when I have to fix the tire and put the same wheel back on, I'll turn the bike upside down. It's just so much more convenient for me and with the bikes I've had.

And yes, if you have difficulty, it probably is partly due to not shifting to the smallest cog prior to removing and then getting the chain onto that same cog when reinstalling.
I haven't owned a bike that would not rock while upside down. Never had brake levers higher than the tops so the stem sits on the pavement and the handlebars want to spin.

I take wheels off from the left side (and lay the bike down on its left side if I need to work on the wheel but right side for my fix gears to keep the chain on the chain peg.and chainring. From behind on the stand.

Ben
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Old 06-09-20, 01:58 PM
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I guess I'm special. I've never had a bike I couldn't turn upside down since I started riding back in the mid 60's
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Old 06-09-20, 08:50 PM
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I'm a fan of turning the bike upside down. Especially with disc brakes, and always with horizontal dropouts.

But, I always think of Rule 49.
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Old 06-10-20, 09:06 AM
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Originally Posted by wipekitty View Post
I'm a fan of turning the bike upside down. Especially with disc brakes, and always with horizontal dropouts.

But, I always think of Rule 49.

RULE 49 // Keep the rubber side down.It is completely unacceptable to intentionally turn one’s steed upside down for any reason under any circumstances. Besides the risk of scratching the saddle, levers and stem, it is unprofessional and a disgrace to your loyal steed. The risk of the bike falling over is increased, wheel removal/replacement is made more difficult and your bidons will leak. The only reason a bicycle should ever be in an upside down position is during mid-rotation while crashing. This Rule also applies to upside down saddle-mount roof bars.

The Velominati is always good for a laugh. Seriously though, I was always under the impression that is was unwise to turn a bike with hydraulic brakes upside down.
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Old 06-10-20, 10:04 AM
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Bidons have improved remarkably since this rule. Even the cheap ones the bikes shops give me for promotional purposes don't leak even when the spout is unlocked.

I'm still gonna be a badass and continue be a rule breaker!
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Old 06-10-20, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Bryan C. View Post
The Velominati is always good for a laugh. Seriously though, I was always under the impression that is was unwise to turn a bike with hydraulic brakes upside down.
It is. Or it can be. They're usually no worse for the wear, but a bubble can work out of the reservoir and in to the line. I certainly wouldn't store it upside-down as a matter of course.
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Old 06-12-20, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
Ah... I wish. My bike stand has an annoying spring that tensions one of the levers that hold it.
Not sure what that means, but if you have a bike work-stand, use it! Annoying spring and all.
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Old 06-12-20, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by wipekitty View Post
I'm a fan of turning the bike upside down. Especially with disc brakes, and always with horizontal dropouts.

But, I always think of Rule 49.
I'd worry about the brake lever accidentally being actuated... does this ever happen when you flip it?
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Old 06-12-20, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Metallifan33 View Post
I'd worry about the brake lever accidentally being actuated... does this ever happen when you flip it?
The wheels are still on while you are flipping the bike. The wheel comes off after the flipping process.
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Old 06-12-20, 12:53 PM
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Accidental actuation of the brake lever while the wheel is removed probably doesn't depend on whether it's flipped. There have been plenty of threads here admitting they grabbed the lever intentionally or unintentionally while the wheel was removed and popped the piston loose.

I guess we need to go back and ask if the bike was flipped or not. <grin> Well, not really, but I'd think if someone else was helping you. And one of you was holding the frame upright, then when trying to keep the front wheel from rolling the wrong lever might be pulled.

So it's a toss up. If you want to be careful, then find a piece of cardboard or plastic or something that is the thickness of your disc and secure it in there with a rubber band or such.

At least by having to remove it before installing the wheel, you'll be reminded to be careful of the brake lever.

Last edited by Iride01; 06-12-20 at 12:56 PM.
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