Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Small backpack for an overnighter?

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Small backpack for an overnighter?

Old 06-08-20, 10:23 PM
  #1  
NoWhammies
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NoWhammies's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 1,611

Bikes: Argon 18 Gallium, BH G7, Rocky Mountain Instinct C70

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 668 Post(s)
Liked 303 Times in 199 Posts
Small backpack for an overnighter?

A group of guys that I ride with are talking about doing a two day ride. We'd be staying in a hotel and eating at restaurants so no need for panniers. In short, all that's needed is a toothbrush, a change of socks, a new jersey (maybe?), a new pair of bibs (maybe?) shorts, a T, and flipflops. Total distance we're looking at is 150k the first day and maybe 150 ~ 160k the next day.

My question is, would I be ok doing a trip like this with a small/light backpack? I'm thinking of using a small camelbak that I have, minus the bladder. The group of guys are roadies, so we'd be riding road bikes. Riding in a pace line, etc. Some of the guys have one of those bags that hang from the top tube. One of the guys suggested NOT going with a backpack, as in the summer heat and riding hard, the backpack would be annoying. Not to mention a real sweaty back.

I have never done an over night like this before, so am looking for guidance/ideas/suggestions.

Thank you.
NoWhammies is offline  
Old 06-08-20, 10:35 PM
  #2  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4899 Post(s)
Liked 1,703 Times in 947 Posts
Having used both, I would definitely put a frame bag over a backpack, but a cycling-specific bag (like a Shimano Unzen or Rokko) is quite comfortable and works really well. I use both several times a year.

I would start by doing some rides with the Camelbak on (loaded with at least the weight of what you expect to take) and see how it feels. IME, none of the hydration packs we have here come close to the Unzen.

The straps on Camelbaks are generally designed for hiking. Road cycling has a very different body position. But hey, testing it is free.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Likes For DrIsotope:
Old 06-08-20, 10:49 PM
  #3  
atwl77
Kamen Rider
 
atwl77's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: KL, MY
Posts: 953

Bikes: Fuji Transonic Elite, Marechal Soul Ultimate, Dahon Dash Altena

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 314 Post(s)
Liked 187 Times in 118 Posts
Backpack certainly needs getting used to, if it is not fitted or adjusted properly it can lead to issues like back pain, shoulder pain and the like. It's something I wouldn't recommend taking out on a trip like this unless you've had time to test and condition yourself.

I'd go with a frame bag, if your bike has the space for it, or a large saddle bag (e.g. from Apidura or Topeak) instead.
atwl77 is offline  
Old 06-08-20, 11:22 PM
  #4  
znomit
Zoom zoom zoom zoom bonk
 
znomit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 4,313

Bikes: Giant Defy, Trek 1.7c, BMC GF02, Fuji Tahoe, Scott Sub 35

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 413 Post(s)
Liked 474 Times in 239 Posts
The Topeak backloader seat bag is ideal. Maybe a bit big. For a summer day trip I,d use my smaller revelate bag. MTB shoes/pedals are a good idea too.
znomit is offline  
Old 06-09-20, 03:51 AM
  #5  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
indyfabz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 30,359
Mentioned: 199 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13342 Post(s)
Liked 6,013 Times in 3,084 Posts
Check to see if there are laundry facilities in/near the hotel. If there are, you can all wash your cycling clothes together and eliminate the need for second sets. (Socks would be the least of my concerns.) And there are travel sizes of toothpaste and even toothbrushes.

What about sunblock? Phone charger?

Refine the gear list first.

Last edited by indyfabz; 06-09-20 at 03:54 AM.
indyfabz is offline  
Likes For indyfabz:
Old 06-09-20, 04:36 AM
  #6  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 7,384
Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 800 Post(s)
Liked 211 Times in 166 Posts
Small backpack for an overnighter?
Originally Posted by NoWhammies View Post
A group of guys that I ride with are talking about doing a two day ride. We'd be staying in a hotel and eating at restaurants so no need for panniers. In short, all that's needed is a toothbrush, a change of socks, a new jersey (maybe?), a new pair of bibs (maybe?) shorts, a T, and flipflops. Total distance we're looking at is 150k the first day and maybe 150 ~ 160k the next day.

My question is, would I be ok doing a trip like this with a small/light backpack? I'm thinking of using a small camelbak that I have, minus the bladder. The group of guys are roadies, so we'd be riding road bikes. Riding in a pace line, etc.

Some of the guys have one of those bags that hang from the top tube. One of the guys suggested NOT going with a backpack, as in the summer heat and riding hard, the backpack would be annoying. Not to mention a real sweaty back.

I have never done an over night like this before, so am looking for guidance/ideas/suggestions.

Thank you.
I have investigated various seatbags meant for road bikes on this thread, “Road bike Rear Rack...no eyelets" (link) and my choice is,
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I use my carbon fiber endurance bike (Specialized S-Works) for commuting, and my best solution has been to use a seat mounted (not seatpost) Arkel 15 Liter Bikepack.



I have sufficient room to carry just about everything I need.

I might add a lightweight backpack for bulky, but light items.
I think the capacity of that bag would be sufficient for a casual overnight stay; I even carry a pair of street shoes for work.

I also have a rectangular elastic cargo net with a hook at each corner that I can wrap around the bikepack to accommodate additional items, e.g. an extra jacket.


Last edited by Jim from Boston; 06-09-20 at 05:16 AM. Reason: added photo of cargo net
Jim from Boston is offline  
Likes For Jim from Boston:
Old 06-09-20, 05:12 AM
  #7  
jack pot 
Fxxxxr
 
jack pot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: falfurrias texas
Posts: 803

Bikes: wabi classic (stolen & recovered)

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1841 Post(s)
Liked 746 Times in 557 Posts
you might try KRIEGA back packs >>> i have used an R30 for over 10 years on moto & bike > they make all sizes & their strap system is A OK for 2 wheelN

KRIEGA R30
__________________
Nothing is true---everything is permitted
jack pot is offline  
Old 06-09-20, 06:04 AM
  #8  
mgopack42 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Los Banos, CA
Posts: 715

Bikes: 2020 Argon 18 Krypton Pro, 2012 Pinarello FP Quatro, 1994 Specialized Allez, 1985 Masi 3V Volumetrica.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 267 Post(s)
Liked 222 Times in 127 Posts
I bought one of these last yer for about $65. it can hold up to 15 liters, but it can go to less than half or that size. The rearmost black portion is soft and can be rolled towards the front most gray portion. pretty well built for cheap. I never got to use it, as Covid 19 cancelled the tour.
Large seat bag
mgopack42 is offline  
Old 06-09-20, 01:05 PM
  #9  
blakcloud 
Senior Member
 
blakcloud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 2,544

Bikes: Trek Domane SL7, Rivendell Sam Hillborne, Winter Cycles flat bar road bike, Brompton S/M3L (modified)

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 585 Post(s)
Liked 315 Times in 203 Posts
Have a look at the Deuter Race EXP Air. It is small and narrow. The best feature is the Air Mesh Back Comfort System. This really works well. My wife used this for our two day jaunt in Japan. I used a slightly larger pack with the same type of mesh system and had no complaints.

The reason I like it on my back vs the seat bag is I want the bike to ride like it always rides. Swinging the bike back and forth as you climb a mountain isn't affected by all that weight that makes the bike top end heavy. On my back the weight is where I want it. Of course this works for me and as you read above others prefer something else.
blakcloud is offline  
Old 06-09-20, 01:18 PM
  #10  
TrojanHorse
SuperGimp
 
TrojanHorse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Whittier, CA
Posts: 13,346

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 147 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1106 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 46 Posts
I took a 14 liter seat bag on a 4 day credit card tour, which was just barely enough room, but something like this might work really well for just an overnight. I'm not a fan of wearing a backpack all day if it's going to be hot out but that's certainly an option too if you don't mind that.
https://www.revelatedesigns.com/inde...eat-bags/Shrew
TrojanHorse is offline  
Old 06-09-20, 01:51 PM
  #11  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 21,996
Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14668 Post(s)
Liked 5,618 Times in 3,217 Posts
This pack rides extremely well. Nice clean lines too. It's $$$ but you can get 20% off at camp saver right now.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 06-09-20, 01:52 PM
  #12  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 21,996
Mentioned: 74 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14668 Post(s)
Liked 5,618 Times in 3,217 Posts
Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
Check to see if there are laundry facilities in/near the hotel. If there are, you can all wash your cycling clothes together and eliminate the need for second sets. (Socks would be the least of my concerns.) And there are travel sizes of toothpaste and even toothbrushes.

What about sunblock? Phone charger?

Refine the gear list first.
Yep. I washed my clothes in the sink staying a night at a hotel at the end of a long backpacking trip. Not quite the same as laundry facility - which many hotels have - but it did the trick.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Old 06-10-20, 07:57 AM
  #13  
rivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 245
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Liked 39 Times in 29 Posts
I use a 6 litre altura saddlebag for commuting. It should do the job for an overnight. The frame bag has been ditched as my bike is slightly too small to access water bottles with it attached.
rivers is online now  
Old 06-10-20, 09:03 AM
  #14  
seypat
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,958
Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1878 Post(s)
Liked 811 Times in 562 Posts
Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
Yep. I washed my clothes in the sink staying a night at a hotel at the end of a long backpacking trip. Not quite the same as laundry facility - which many hotels have - but it did the trick.
That's good enough. Bring a travel size container of what you use for detergent and wash your clothes at the end of your shower. Hang them up after everyone has showered. Good to go.
seypat is offline  
Likes For seypat:
Old 06-10-20, 07:15 PM
  #15  
RGMN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Twin Cities,MN
Posts: 454
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 203 Post(s)
Liked 148 Times in 105 Posts
I had an Osprey Raptor 14 backpack that I used for commuting. It was super comfy and everything I needed for a day a work fit in it no problem, but I eventually replaced it with a seatpost mounted rack and a trunk bag. MUCH more comfortable even on an hour commute ride. I couldn't imagine riding all day with the backpack even if it fit and was comfortable. I have a Salsa EXP seat bag but haven't tried it out yet due to working from home. It goes on and off the bike almost as easy as the trunk bag, and there is no messing with the seatpost rack.
RGMN is offline  
Old 06-10-20, 07:38 PM
  #16  
merlinextraligh
pan y agua
 
merlinextraligh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Jacksonville
Posts: 30,775

Bikes: Willier Zero 7; Merlin Extralight; Calfee Dragonfly tandem, Calfee Adventure tandem; Cervelo P2; Motebecane Ti Fly 29er; Motebecanne Phantom Cross; Schwinn Paramount Track bike

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1129 Post(s)
Liked 257 Times in 139 Posts
Ortlieb stuff is a bit pricey but awesome. An Ortlieb seat bag and a handlebar bag will give you all you need.

and the 2 together will be balanced
__________________
You could fall off a cliff and die.
You could get lost and die.
You could hit a tree and die.
OR YOU COULD STAY HOME AND FALL OFF THE COUCH AND DIE.
merlinextraligh is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.