Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

GP 5000 TL 28 vs. 32mm - which is faster/better

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

GP 5000 TL 28 vs. 32mm - which is faster/better

Old 06-24-20, 12:39 PM
  #1  
kosmo886
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
GP 5000 TL 28 vs. 32mm - which is faster/better

Any thoughts on which of these would be faster? Essentially I’d love to go with the versatility of a 32mm, but don’t want to give up speed if there is much difference between this and the 28mm. What do you think?

Finally...how would these compare to the MAXXIS Velocita 40mm which is described as a high volume endurance slick.

This is going on a Giant Revolt Advanced 0.
kosmo886 is offline  
Old 06-24-20, 01:14 PM
  #2  
Rides4Beer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: SC
Posts: 1,146

Bikes: Defy | Revolt

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 586 Post(s)
Liked 497 Times in 283 Posts
Probably no noticeable difference in speed, lil more comfort and grip with the 32s tho. I'm running 32mm GP5K clinchers and they're great.
Rides4Beer is offline  
Likes For Rides4Beer:
Old 06-24-20, 01:24 PM
  #3  
Dean V
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,623
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 931 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 119 Times in 79 Posts
You have a Giant Revolt and a Cannondale Topstone?
Dean V is offline  
Old 06-24-20, 01:27 PM
  #4  
alcjphil
Senior Member
 
alcjphil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 3,934
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 967 Post(s)
Liked 317 Times in 210 Posts
How bad or good are the roads where you live? Where do you live. Around Montreal where I live roads are frost heaved during the winter resulting in very rough pavement year round. Roads are cracked and broken and poorly repaired. There is a condition on some roads I call "faux pave" feels like cobblestones but doesn't look as attractive. On good roads 700 x 25 is fine, but 700 x 28 feels better. On bad roads a good lightweight tire like the 700 x 32 GP 5000 will glide over the broken pavement much better than a 700 x 28 which will have to be run at higher pressure. The worse your roads the faster a wider tire will be compared to a narrower tire
alcjphil is online now  
Old 06-24-20, 01:36 PM
  #5  
kosmo886
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
You have a Giant Revolt and a Cannondale Topstone?
Just the Revolt. Had the Topstone ordered and when I went to pick it up I was able to do a side by side ride and the comparison wasn’t even close!
kosmo886 is offline  
Old 06-24-20, 01:39 PM
  #6  
kosmo886
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
How bad or good are the roads where you live? Where do you live. Around Montreal where I live roads are frost heaved during the winter resulting in very rough pavement year round. Roads are cracked and broken and poorly repaired. There is a condition on some roads I call "faux pave" feels like cobblestones but doesn't look as attractive. On good roads 700 x 25 is fine, but 700 x 28 feels better. On bad roads a good lightweight tire like the 700 x 32 GP 5000 will glide over the broken pavement much better than a 700 x 28 which will have to be run at higher pressure. The worse your roads the faster a wider tire will be compared to a narrower tire
I am in MA...roads are crappy typically. I’ve been leaning toward the 32 for this reason as well. Just don’t want to give up much speed. Seems like I will have to replace the 40mm tires that are stock though. They are “slicks” but still gonna loose some speed there.
kosmo886 is offline  
Old 06-24-20, 02:43 PM
  #7  
Iride01
Senior Member
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 4,272

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '91 Schwinn Paramount '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1604 Post(s)
Liked 500 Times in 381 Posts
You keep track of your ride data don't you? Run one set for a full season of riding then run the other set for a full season. Compare rides on the same routes and let us know in two or three years.
Iride01 is online now  
Old 06-24-20, 03:20 PM
  #8  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: TC, MN
Posts: 30,545

Bikes: R3 Disc, Haanjo

Mentioned: 337 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13511 Post(s)
Liked 2,790 Times in 1,501 Posts
You're probably not going to notice any meaningful difference between the two when it comes to ride time over a given course, but you may notice a difference in feel between the two depending upon your weight, roads, riding style, rims, etc. Second-hand experience probably isn't going to meaningfully convey the nuance between the two and, in the end, we're talking about consumables. Buy both, wear 'em out and form your own opinion.
WhyFi is online now  
Old 06-24-20, 03:44 PM
  #9  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,124

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3094 Post(s)
Liked 468 Times in 348 Posts
Put a 28 in the front and 32 in the rear; if the bike's wheelbase gets longer then the 32 is slowing you down. If the wheelbase shrinks then the 28 is slower.
Sy Reene is offline  
Likes For Sy Reene:
Old 06-24-20, 04:00 PM
  #10  
PoorInRichfield
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Richfield, WI
Posts: 445

Bikes: Trek Domane SL7 Disc, Trek Boone 9, Cannondale F29

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 231 Post(s)
Liked 165 Times in 101 Posts
I have the GP 5000 TL in size 700x32c and setup tubeless on my bike and I love 'em. I was previously running 25c and 28c tires. With wide rims (mine are 25mm internal width) and lower tire pressure (~65psi), the 32's are the most comfortable road tire I've ever used. If they're slower than my other tires, I'd have no idea as I don't race (although I tried to ride fast.)

Roads I ride on often look like the following (of which this IS one of the roads I ride), which is why 32's have become my new best friend...

PoorInRichfield is offline  
Likes For PoorInRichfield:
Old 06-24-20, 09:00 PM
  #11  
Dean V
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,623
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 931 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 119 Times in 79 Posts
Originally Posted by kosmo886 View Post
Just the Revolt. Had the Topstone ordered and when I went to pick it up I was able to do a side by side ride and the comparison wasn’t even close!
How were they not even close?
Did the Topstone have the lefty fork on it?
Dean V is offline  
Old 06-24-20, 11:50 PM
  #12  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 3,432
Mentioned: 37 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1544 Post(s)
Liked 493 Times in 261 Posts
Originally Posted by kosmo886 View Post
Any thoughts on which of these would be faster? Essentially I’d love to go with the versatility of a 32mm, but don’t want to give up speed if there is much difference between this and the 28mm. What do you think?
If you have a reason to err wide, err wide. Even on a perfectly smooth and clean surface where there's no obvious benefit in 32mm over 28mm (except for maybe wear life), the performance penalties of a few millimeters of extra tire width are minimal. It's possible to distinguish the added aerodynamic drag by doing careful testing, and physics allows us to predict and model the kinematic effects of the added weight, but these aren't impacts that are casually noticeable on the bike or when just eyeballing average speed data on Strava.

Finally...how would these compare to the MAXXIS Velocita 40mm which is described as a high volume endurance slick.
Hard to say without testing. Some casing construction factors, such as protection layers for cuts and punctures, can have big effects on rolling resistance. When comparing two slicks, the performance differences from these factors can often play a significantly larger roll than more visible things like tire width. In extreme cases it can even be the other way around: even on a smooth road, a fast 40mm slick can sometimes be faster than a slow 28mm slick.

It's likely that the two GP5000 options perform much more similarly to one another than either does to the Velocita.
HTupolev is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 05:37 AM
  #13  
kosmo886
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by Dean V View Post
How were they not even close?
Did the Topstone have the lefty fork on it?
No lefty fork. Was the 105 Carbon vs. Revolt Advanced 2. both in the 2500-2800 range price wise. Very different ride.
kosmo886 is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 05:40 AM
  #14  
kosmo886
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 105 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by HTupolev View Post
If you have a reason to err wide, err wide. Even on a perfectly smooth and clean surface where there's no obvious benefit in 32mm over 28mm (except for maybe wear life), the performance penalties of a few millimeters of extra tire width are minimal. It's possible to distinguish the added aerodynamic drag by doing careful testing, and physics allows us to predict and model the kinematic effects of the added weight, but these aren't impacts that are casually noticeable on the bike or when just eyeballing average speed data on Strava.


Hard to say without testing. Some casing construction factors, such as protection layers for cuts and punctures, can have big effects on rolling resistance. When comparing two slicks, the performance differences from these factors can often play a significantly larger roll than more visible things like tire width. In extreme cases it can even be the other way around: even on a smooth road, a fast 40mm slick can sometimes be faster than a slow 28mm slick.

It's likely that the two GP5000 options perform much more similarly to one another than either does to the Velocita.
Makes sense. I know none of this is an exact science. will be tough to compare side by side given the need to change the tires. That said, I think it's a safe assumption that the 32mm GP 5000 will be noticeably faster on the road than the 40mm Velocita. I've also read some interesting tests comparing the GP 5000 line and finding that width doesn't matter much between the few sizes depending on pressure and ride conditions, which in the real world are never all that smooth...hence the slightly larger may be just as fast and certainly a bit more comfy.
kosmo886 is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 06:10 AM
  #15  
ups
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Posts: 105
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 38 Post(s)
Liked 27 Times in 19 Posts
No real difference in rolling resistance.
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...endurance-test

Going from a 40 to a 32 is an easier transition than 40 to 28.
ups is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 06:16 AM
  #16  
smashndash
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 993

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Allez Sprint Comp

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Liked 170 Times in 125 Posts
Originally Posted by kosmo886 View Post
hence the slightly larger may be just as fast and certainly a bit more comfy.
I think the wide tire discussion is much simpler than most people make it out to be. Think about it like suspension on a mountain bike.

Regardless of whether you have a 23 or a 32, you can run a certain pressure to achieve the same amount of comfort over mild bumps. The difference is that, with big hits, you will crack your rims riding 23s but be fine with 32s. The only penalty to wider tires is aerodynamics (lol) and weight (lol again).
smashndash is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 09:25 AM
  #17  
eduskator
Senior Member
 
eduskator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Québec, Canada
Posts: 744

Bikes: TCR Advanced Pro 0 Disc

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 333 Post(s)
Liked 158 Times in 124 Posts
Heeeeeeere we go again
eduskator is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 10:38 AM
  #18  
Tacoenthusiast
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 232
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 127 Post(s)
Liked 218 Times in 83 Posts
If faster was the real driving factor shouldn't you be on a roadbike instead of a gravel bike?

Go with the bigger tires, it'll be more comfortable.
Tacoenthusiast is offline  
Likes For Tacoenthusiast:
Old 06-25-20, 01:29 PM
  #19  
Wooderson
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 16 Posts
In the past year, I've ridden GP4K 700 x 25 which were 28mm wide, GP4K 700 x 28 which were 31mm wide. I'm currently riding 700 x 32 tubeless tires that actually measure 32mm, and while they're super plush, they just feel too wide to me. I notice the weight. I feel like the 'wider is always better' mantra is valid up to around 30mm, but beyond that, I do think the weight and aero become a factor. I know this is controversial, and I freely admit that it could be in my head. I don't care what internet rolling resistance studies say, I know how my bike feels on my routes with different tires.

Anyway, I'm mounting a new set of GP5K TL 700x28 this weekend. I think this will the optimal tire for my riding style. I'll probably run them at 65/60 psi (maybe lower, I will experiment), I'm pretty sure I'll get almost all the benefit of the 32mm tires I'm using now. I'll post back in a month or two with the results.
Wooderson is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 04:13 PM
  #20  
August West
Senior Member
 
August West's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 385

Bikes: Domane SLR7 Project One. Fuel EX 8 XT.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 130 Post(s)
Liked 136 Times in 80 Posts
I've ended up with 32mm as my go-to tires. But I ride on a bunch of god awful chip seal roads with plenty of cattle gates for extra fun. If I road on good roads I'd probably drop down to 28mm.
August West is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 04:30 PM
  #21  
Sy Reene
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 6,124

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3094 Post(s)
Liked 468 Times in 348 Posts
Originally Posted by smashndash View Post
I think the wide tire discussion is much simpler than most people make it out to be. Think about it like suspension on a mountain bike.

Regardless of whether you have a 23 or a 32, you can run a certain pressure to achieve the same amount of comfort over mild bumps. The difference is that, with big hits, you will crack your rims riding 23s but be fine with 32s. The only penalty to wider tires is aerodynamics (lol) and weight (lol again).
Exactly.. give it a couple more years, and we'll more sensibly be riding stuff like this.
Sy Reene is offline  
Old 06-25-20, 04:38 PM
  #22  
smashndash
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 993

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Allez Sprint Comp

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 598 Post(s)
Liked 170 Times in 125 Posts
Originally Posted by Sy Reene View Post
Exactly.. give it a couple more years, and we'll more sensibly be riding stuff like this.
We’re getting closer. 3T is launching a 29i/40e aero rim that’s optimized for 35mm tires. They believe that’s a fine size for regular road riding.




^this is with their old 25i/32e rims
smashndash is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.