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Brand new question....concerning long distance stuff

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Brand new question....concerning long distance stuff

Old 02-21-01, 04:31 PM
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inkster
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Hi everyone!

I am a brand new biker and am taking on the Heartland AIDS Ride this summer. 600 miles - 6 days. Yikes.

I dont have a clue where to start with training and equipment! ARG! Would anyone offer to help me with the basic questions on how to start? If so, please email me or ICQ me.

My email is curt@inkdesigngroup.com
my icq# is 13730025

Thanks in advance, I can't WAIT to get training!1!
Curt Wagner
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Old 02-21-01, 09:29 PM
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Chris L
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Training

The best way to train for something like that is to build up the distance and difficulty of your rides gradually. If you try to push too hard too early you'll run into problems.

As far as long distance riding goes, the best thing I can say is to ride at a pace you are comfortable with, and drink heaps of water (and make sure you eat enough). If you do those things you'll be surprised how quickly your finess level will build up.

Also, if you're doing it for more than one day at a time, stretching before and after the ride can prevent things like lactic acid build up and aid your recovery time.

I hope all this helps.

Chris
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Old 02-21-01, 10:37 PM
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training.

Thanks,

And would someone help me design a workout and a diet for the next four months for the ride mentioned above?

I just quit smoking 2 months ago, Im 30, in fairly decent shape, but dont do ANY excersising as of now. And I'm very serious about this.

Thanks to anyone who can help! REALLY.

Sincerely,
Curt Wagner
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Old 02-22-01, 04:22 AM
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As a non-athletic recent former smoker, you have to be realistic in what you can achieve. 6 centuries in 6 days is a very tough ordeal for those who dont live on their saddle.
The usual first target for someone getting into endurance cycling is a single century ride. That is about 8-10 hrs riding. You probably need 3 months regular cycling before you can ride a century. If you are not used to the riding position you can suffer problems in your butt, hands, knees etc. You need to recover from a century, and riding 6 in a row will deny your body that rest, leading to a greater chance of injury.

Start with a couple of 10 mile rides, at an easy pace. Spin your pedals freely, dont push hard, and dont worry about the time or speed. Make sure you have enough low gears to cope with your pace and terrain.

Increase to 20 miles. This is probably a good distance for regular training. Try and use your commuting journey for training, or you will have trouble fitting in the time.
At weekends try longer rides, a couple of 40s, 50s then 60s.
60 is probably the starting point of long endurance rides.
Make sure your bike fits you well. Endurance riders pay close attention to their bike ergonomics, and do not always ride like competative racers.

Whilst AIDS may be a worthy cause to ride for, there is no point riding yourself into illness and injury. You will not be doing anyone a favour.
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Old 02-22-01, 12:21 PM
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good advice

Thanks for the advice, and I took it very seriously so thanks. I am more committed to this ride from a personal standpoint, like doing it becuase I dont think I can. So training smart and training hard are the two things I am taking on. Thanks again!

Curt
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Old 02-25-01, 11:09 AM
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Work on your "spin" too learn to pedal at 100 rpm so when you're not thinking about it you'll be in the 90 rpm range. Be patient it takes a while to get used to, but it will make you much more efficient and will help prevent injury.

After you get used to the bike- ride hard when you don't have time for a long ride. Ride easy on the long ones.
(A short ride at high intensity will do you as much if not more good than a long easy ride)

Be sure to take a day or two off every week to rest and regenerate. A short easy spin to loosen up and circulate the blood is reccomended on (some of) those days
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Old 03-01-01, 10:34 AM
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Have you contacted the AIDs people about training schedules? These organized rides generally have group training rides and a schedule to follow.
If they don't Bicycling magazine usually has training schedules in one of the spring issues and possibly on their website - http://www.bicycling.com
Preparing for long rides takes a few months. Don't rush into it without a plan. If you can't find anything in Bicycling magazine try your local bookstore or ask at your LBS.
Good luck!

Ron
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