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Chain waxing. How to avoid the flaky mess?

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Chain waxing. How to avoid the flaky mess?

Old 09-18-20, 10:00 AM
  #51  
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
no, itís a liquid wax in an alcohol carrier.
Careful with that. Make sure you are watching the condition of your chain. I made a liquid solution of paraffin and 90% alcohol to use on my trainer bike between hot wax jobs and it ended up rusting my chain.
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Old 09-18-20, 07:01 PM
  #52  
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Originally Posted by jadocs View Post
Careful with that. Make sure you are watching the condition of your chain. I made a liquid solution of paraffin and 90% alcohol to use on my trainer bike between hot wax jobs and it ended up rusting my chain.
Itís now got 2750 miles, no appreciable wear, itís been ridden in the wet and there is no rust.

I donít know what you did to your chain, but alcohol wonít rust it - it evaporates too fast. Itís more likely your wax mixture didnít adhere to the metal.

At any rate, this stuff works and itís highly recommended. No such problems as you mention over the last several months including high humidity etc..

J.
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Old 09-19-20, 05:43 AM
  #53  
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A much better way to go (50+ years)

Originally Posted by InvertedMP View Post
So I have been waxing my chain now, using the Silica Secret Chain Wax bag. I am not sure the flaky mess and wax buildup on the cassette afterwards is worth it. I thought the idea of chain waxing was to keep the drivetrain super clean, what am I missing or doing wrong?
______________________________________________
For many years I tried WD-40. It seemed to work for a few days. It is a great cleaner, but then with the wax it gummed the chain up and I would re apply. I noticed the same results on other slides etc. thatI tried it on. I then tried a really light oil made by Boeing available at bike shops. It was a huge improvement over WD-40( a wax base).I used this product for many years because the chain even spun much easier especially over the waxes, which were the worst. I even bought a bottle of liquid plastic , (from the local bike shop) a very popular brand, that was supposed to give better protection from dirt and grim, but I just couldn't get myself to try it. It just didn't make sense to gum up my new chain on my brand new ,expensive, bicycle . I saw one of the posts that said He used PTFE mixed with the wax. This would guarantee to plug things up. The whole marketing idea is phoney. The new stuff I am now using, is unbelievably superior when it comes to metal against metal wear. It actually goes right into the metal. I applied it to my nice chain a year ago and it is still running better than when it was new. It has blown my socks off. I have tried it on other things as well, like door hinges and swamp cooler bearings and 3D printer bearings that used to have to be replaced every month are still running after more than two years. I tried it on some old rusted chains on 4 bikes that had sat outside in the weather all winter. They were all kinked up and rusted up. I tried it on them, carefully putting 1 drop on each link. I let them set for 4 days and they act just like a brand new chain and I don't know where the rust went. My wife and daughter are still using the chains with no touch ups from last year. If you don't believe me try your gunk in a lock like I did and watch it ruin it. That is why I used to use only graphite pwd in a lock till I learned about this lube that I am currently using. I have now tried it in all of my outside -in-the-weather locks. Some of them have been lubed for 2 years now and they still work like a charm. But back to bike chains, wouldn't you want something that actually cuts down on the wear? That is what lubrication is for. I even tried some regular engine oil because we use it to lubricate our car engines to help them last longer, but I found out it doesn't work so good for bike chains as it is too heavy and slowed me down, as well as being messy and just spinning off.

I would give the name of the stuff I am currently using but I don't know if I would be violating the terms and conditions for this website. Any feedback? Thanks.

Last edited by oldernwiser; 09-19-20 at 05:48 AM.
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Old 09-19-20, 07:21 AM
  #54  
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
Itís now got 2750 miles, no appreciable wear, itís been ridden in the wet and there is no rust.

I donít know what you did to your chain, but alcohol wonít rust it - it evaporates too fast. Itís more likely your wax mixture didnít adhere to the metal.

At any rate, this stuff works and itís highly recommended. No such problems as you mention over the last several months including high humidity etc..

J.
No idea how it happened. It was straight paraffin and alcohol, no additives. Indoor bike ridden on rollers only, so no exposure to outside elements.
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Old 09-19-20, 01:59 PM
  #55  
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Originally Posted by jadocs View Post
No idea how it happened. It was straight paraffin and alcohol, no additives. Indoor bike ridden on rollers only, so no exposure to outside elements.
Indoor? Likely sweat. Just about as corrosive as it gets. A few drops would work itís way around the chain fast.
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Old 09-22-20, 11:21 AM
  #56  
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Decades ago there was an article that I read on waxing the chain and since I was tired of the mess from oil based lubricants I gave it a try. It worked well, however, removing the chain with a rivet tool was a bit of an inconvenience. Now we have quick links or master links

I use the Oz Cycling wax technique. I like the fact that the, what the Aussie's call paraffin oil, makes the wax more soft. My challenge was what is "paraffin oil". In the US we would call it lamp oil. The next problem is finding it without citronella. If you like the smell or you want to repel bugs then this is for you. I ended up ordering it online without the citronella.

I use a rice cooker to heat the wax and keep a thermometer in the wax.

He has some good video's. I don't know what his background is, however, it does a good job of qualifying chain wear. He also has a good video on waterproofing clothing.

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Old 09-24-20, 09:01 PM
  #57  
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I just did my 3 bikes, just wanted to try it. I used Gulfwax and PTFE both from Amazon but if I were to buy again I'd just buy Molten Speed Wax which already has the PTFE in it and ends up actually being cheaper and probably better. Can't report much on longevity since I've only went 30 miles on my full squish mtn bike so far but it is working fine and it is really nice not getting filthy every time I touch it.
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Old 09-25-20, 03:02 AM
  #58  
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Chain waxing vs oil lube

Originally Posted by InvertedMP View Post
So I have been waxing my chain now, using the Silica Secret Chain Wax bag. I am not sure the flaky mess and wax buildup on the cassette afterwards is worth it. I thought the idea of chain waxing was to keep the drivetrain super clean, what am I missing or doing wrong?
Don't use it. Step up to a superior oil in every way.
I tried chain waxing over 25 years ago and then again about 10 years ago with some White Lightning for lubing knife folders. I always found Boeing oil to be superior to waxing. (the jet company- I think it was called K9). With wax , I could never get the wax thin enough to not gum things up when the temperatures got below 0 degrees , for example :-) It actually made it harder to pedal. It would slow my times down. Yes it helps keep dirt out? At least it doesn't attract dirt like an oil would? But think about it, what kind of protection is it going to give the links under pressure? (Climbing a 15 degree hill for example)
I tried WD-40 for many years, because it was a wax base or is it silicone base? Anyway it is perhaps a great cleaner, but not great as a lubricant for very long. It also gums the chain up and required me to have to clean it again. It comes off in the rain and snow. I now use (for the last 2 years) an oil that has no wax or silicone. It actually goes into the pores of the metal and almost obliterates wear. I use it on everything metal to metal practically. Works in winter snow and temperatures below 0 degrees. Believe it or not, I still ride, even though I have fallen down many times on the ice or in ruts). My son uses it on his 3D printer bearings that he was having to replace every month, now they are still going after 2 years. Now that is objective, verifyable, non biased , lubrication.😀😁😇 I noticed a difference in roller skate bearings within seconds. I especially found that this oil works wonders under pressures of over 300,000.psi. I use it in my gun barrels, firing pins, door hinges, bike locks (yes, better than graphite), sewing machine, I even tried it on my swamp cooler bearings when they were squealing (a couple of years ago). Mike Eager now has over 1 Million miles on his 1959 Chev. truck all original equipment (metal). When I first tried it on some rusted bike chains, I wondered where the rust went, the oil stayed on the chain, and did not drop on the floor like the Boeing K9 did. I noticed even with my neighbors bicycles a difference in just a few minutes, that the chain noise just almost disappeared. Shifting became easier and quieter as well. As you can tell, I am absolutely sold on the performance of this oil. I would even personally gaurantee it to be the best oil you have ever used, that you notice a difference or your money back. I have been using Mikes oil products now for 15 years +. Call or text me and I can give you a lot more stories, pictures and graphs. I tried it and now believe it.

Last edited by oldernwiser; 09-25-20 at 03:13 AM.
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Old 09-25-20, 06:30 AM
  #59  
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Old 09-25-20, 06:56 AM
  #60  
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Originally Posted by oldernwiser View Post
Don't use it. Step up to a superior oil in every way.
I tried chain waxing over 25 years ago and then again about 10 years ago with some White Lightning for lubing knife folders. I always found Boeing oil to be superior to waxing. (the jet company- I think it was called K9). With wax , I could never get the wax thin enough to not gum things up when the temperatures got below 0 degrees , for example :-) It actually made it harder to pedal. It would slow my times down. Yes it helps keep dirt out? At least it doesn't attract dirt like an oil would? But think about it, what kind of protection is it going to give the links under pressure? (Climbing a 15 degree hill for example)
I tried WD-40 for many years, because it was a wax base or is it silicone base? Anyway it is perhaps a great cleaner, but not great as a lubricant for very long. It also gums the chain up and required me to have to clean it again. It comes off in the rain and snow. I now use (for the last 2 years) an oil that has no wax or silicone. It actually goes into the pores of the metal and almost obliterates wear. I use it on everything metal to metal practically. Works in winter snow and temperatures below 0 degrees. Believe it or not, I still ride, even though I have fallen down many times on the ice or in ruts). My son uses it on his 3D printer bearings that he was having to replace every month, now they are still going after 2 years. Now that is objective, verifyable, non biased , lubrication.😀😁😇 I noticed a difference in roller skate bearings within seconds. I especially found that this oil works wonders under pressures of over 300,000.psi. I use it in my gun barrels, firing pins, door hinges, bike locks (yes, better than graphite), sewing machine, I even tried it on my swamp cooler bearings when they were squealing (a couple of years ago). Mike Eager now has over 1 Million miles on his 1959 Chev. truck all original equipment (metal). When I first tried it on some rusted bike chains, I wondered where the rust went, the oil stayed on the chain, and did not drop on the floor like the Boeing K9 did. I noticed even with my neighbors bicycles a difference in just a few minutes, that the chain noise just almost disappeared. Shifting became easier and quieter as well. As you can tell, I am absolutely sold on the performance of this oil. I would even personally gaurantee it to be the best oil you have ever used, that you notice a difference or your money back. I have been using Mikes oil products now for 15 years +. Call or text me and I can give you a lot more stories, pictures and graphs. I tried it and now believe it.
Is this supposed to be read in a breathless infomercial fashion?
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Old 09-25-20, 12:09 PM
  #61  
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Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Is this supposed to be read in a breathless infomercial fashion?
Probably Vince's cousin (the ShamWoW guy)
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Old 09-25-20, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by InvertedMP View Post
So I have been waxing my chain now, using the Silica Secret Chain Wax bag. I am not sure the flaky mess and wax buildup on the cassette afterwards is worth it. I thought the idea of chain waxing was to keep the drivetrain super clean, what am I missing or doing wrong?
I'm a couple of weeks (300 miles) on my first chain waxed with the Silca wax, and I'm sold. The flakes and mess went away by the time I got back from my first ride, and everything still looks great, shifts great, runs quiet, and feels smooth. Did you hang the waxed chain up overnight (or for at least an hour or two) to completely cool and dry, and then work it in your hands for a minute to loosen it up? That got rid of a lot of flakes for me.

I'm happy enough with the wax on my road bike that I'm thinking of waxing my CX bike chain, too. I'm thinking the wax will attract a lot less sand, and should be as water resistant (if not more so) than oil. Anyone using wax on CX/gravel/MTB?
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