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Do Tour pros tend to ride lower saddle heights?

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Do Tour pros tend to ride lower saddle heights?

Old 09-01-20, 03:04 PM
  #26  
BoraxKid
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Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
I didn't miss it, I ignored it. Since nowhere is the threshold for a noticeable difference defined, in this context it's a word without meaning. Given enough effort, any difference is measurable (noticeable). So yes, 75% will always be noticeably lower that the top 25%.
Okay, so first you claim you ignored the word, then you claim it has no meaning, and then you claim you assigned an arbitrary meaning to it. So because you arbitrarily chose to re-interpret a word that already had an actual meaning of its own to mean something completely different, the rest of the world is supposed to just read your mind and subscribe to your creative choice? Are you actually serious with this?
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Old 09-01-20, 03:17 PM
  #27  
Branko D
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
First: never look at a pro's bike for setup tips. They're a different species.
Second: if your knees, hips, and back are okay with it, your saddle height is probably fine. Could you put out more power with it adjusted differently? Maybe. Maybe not. I'm not you, I dunno.
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Cycling isn't unique. In every other sport, you look at what the pros are doing and draw lessons from that. There are good reasons why they do what they do, and most apply to everyone who wants to improve. Low handlebars, for instance, you really can gradually condition yourself to ride that way (shaving off some weight and doing some core work might be needed, but it's doable), and the speed improvements are measurable and significant. So on and so forth. They're not aliens, we have the same biomechanics, we're just slower.
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If you're comfortable even on really long days in the saddle, it's probably better not to touch the saddle position, but anecdotally many aren't entirely happy.

As for power, you can try faffing around with saddle height and a powermeter. At least that's easy today... but frankly I couldn't find a significant difference for a 10 min effort either a few mm up or down, so if differences exist they're probably within day to day differences in how you feel and how hard you can go on a given day.
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Last edited by Branko D; 09-01-20 at 03:27 PM.
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Old 09-01-20, 05:03 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
Or the question could be stated:

is it normal for amateurs have their saddles too high?
This right here.
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Old 09-02-20, 03:20 AM
  #29  
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When looking at pro racers saddle height dynamically (IE while they're pedaling) it's important to note where they're perched on the saddle. When making big power on the flats they'll pull themselves out on the nose of the saddle, effectively placing their hips closer to the BB center/reducing setback. This effectively reduces saddle height just as pushing the hips toward the rear of the saddle during a seated climb increases it.
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Old 09-02-20, 04:23 AM
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Originally Posted by nomadmax View Post
When looking at pro racers saddle height dynamically (IE while they're pedaling) it's important to note where they're perched on the saddle. When making big power on the flats they'll pull themselves out on the nose of the saddle, effectively placing their hips closer to the BB center/reducing setback. This effectively reduces saddle height just as pushing the hips toward the rear of the saddle during a seated climb increases it.
True, but riding on the rivet and pushed back on the saddle and standing all serve the same function: that of moving the center of gravity forward to enable (temporarily) higher power output, albeit with reduced efficiency. For higher cadence and high power, you ride on the rivet; for lower cadence and progressively higher power, you ride pushed back on the saddle or stand. Setback and saddle height should be set for efficient steady-state riding.
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Old 09-02-20, 10:52 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by mkadam68 View Post
This right here.
I see too many people with hips rocking side to side. The advice of heel on the pedal is one I have used for years as a starting point, then adjust up or down from there. It is good advice because it establishes that starting point, one that lessens the likelihood of hip rocking.
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Old 09-03-20, 11:59 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by seypat View Post
I don't notice any of these pros having high saddles. Do what works for you.

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Old 04-02-21, 04:28 PM
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I've watched countless fit videos, read countless articles and watched tons and tons of races. Some pros seem to have their saddles jacked to the point of the seat post falling out while others have their saddles low. As another poster pointed out I don't think there is a perfect formula as each person's body dimensions can vary wildy even if two people are the same height.

I've played with my saddle height, angle and fore/aft position quite a bit and found millimeters definitely matter. I've found that the LeMond method and the other method of I think is multiplying inseam x 1.18? really doesn't work for me. Those two methods had me lowering my saddle by a rediculous amount (35-45mm's). I've found the heel on pedal method has worked best for me.
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Old 04-02-21, 05:52 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by woodcraft View Post
IMO, too high of saddle is very common among road cyclists...

and reports of fitters setting them up that way are also common.
Don't your hips have to rock before your seat is considered too high? I don't see that very much at all...
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Old 04-02-21, 06:50 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by asgelle View Post
So without internal bias, what fraction of the peloton would you estimate have saddles lower than the highest quartile?
3 quartile's worth?
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Old 04-02-21, 08:28 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
Don't your hips have to rock before your seat is considered too high? I don't see that very much at all...

I'd say that if the hips are rocking that is much too high, and there could be another 2cm that is less obviously too high.

The fitters talk about it as losing control at the bottom of the pedal stroke as the leg gets too straight.

There can also be tipping the hips to one side to favor one leg, if both legs can't reach the pedals effectively, so instead of rocking, there is a perma-slouch.
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Old 04-02-21, 09:09 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by waters60 View Post
I see too many people with hips rocking side to side. The advice of heel on the pedal is one I have used for years as a starting point, then adjust up or down from there. It is good advice because it establishes that starting point, one that lessens the likelihood of hip rocking.
As I said in my post last page, I do the heel test barefoot. Almost everyone else I know who uses this does it in shoes. The great aspect of this test is that it is exact. 1mm either way and you are out of the spot where you can either extend your down leg or bend your knee and keep the heel on the pedal. If you like a higher seat than I do, find the shoes with the perfect heel and keep them simply for this test. (I've heard everything from my barefoot to leather street shoes with real heels.) You could use a shoe that is slightly low and shim your heel with cardboard, a small piece of thin plywood or whatever. Doesn't have to be comfortable.
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Old 04-03-21, 09:36 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by datlas View Post
I noticed the same thing. I used the Greg LeMond/Cyrille Guimard formula of 0.883 back in the 1980's and have stuck with that as it feels right for me, but maybe it yields a saddle height a cm or two too high compared to current thinking?
According to this formula height is measured from the middle of the crank axle along the seat tube to the top of the saddle. This doesn't make sense to me since it doesn't account for crank arm length. Using this formula my saddle height should be 72.5 cm. And seat height on my CAAD 12 and Guru are different. Unless the measurement is made from the pedal spindle. Then they are the same. That's because crank arm length is different for the bikes.
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Old 04-03-21, 10:02 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by bruce19 View Post
According to this formula height is measured from the middle of the crank axle along the seat tube to the top of the saddle. This doesn't make sense to me since it doesn't account for crank arm length. Using this formula my saddle height should be 72.5 cm. And seat height on my CAAD 12 and Guru are different. Unless the measurement is made from the pedal spindle. Then they are the same. That's because crank arm length is different for the bikes.
I can't reconcile this formula to myself. I'm perfectly comfortable, with slight knee bend at the bottom (175cm crankarms and relatively low stack height of speedplay pedals), and a saddle to BB height of 80cm. Formula tells me that my 33.5" (85cm) inseam should only be 75cm saddle height. I presume I have some toe-down characteristic at the bottom of my stroke (2" worth?) -- visually it's not at all extreme if one stands on the balls of one's feet and raises their heel 2" (especially if they have size 14 feet)
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