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Deciding Litespeed vs Lynskey vs?

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Deciding Litespeed vs Lynskey vs?

Old 03-01-21, 06:52 AM
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specie
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Deciding Litespeed vs Lynskey vs?

Iím a newbie and have been reading this forum last couple weeks. I really like the simple aesthetic of a titanium frame and ease of care. Iím looking to get one ďniceĒ bike and not upgrading frames later on. Not looking to race or ride competitive; more of a decent workout 20-30mi rides 1-2x/week. Would like a compliant bike thatís not too fatiguing. Budget is somewhat flexible < $2.5k
Iíve looked online and seen a Litepeed Tachyon ($800; 9sp Ultegra) and a Lynskey R230 ($1600 10sp Ultegra). I can upgrade the components on the Litespeed if need be. Iíve searched for info online, but can you guys provide some opinions/experience on either or both frames? Should I look into a model?

Thanks
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Old 03-01-21, 07:11 AM
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WhyFi
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Isn't the Tachyon a tri bike?

Otherwise, if you're looking at the used Ti market and you find something that fits, I wouldn't pass up a decent deal on either brand - take the opportunity you're given.
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Old 03-01-21, 08:14 AM
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shelbyfv
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Older road bikes tend to have less tire clearance. Of the two choices, I'd take the Lynskey. It's still well within your budget.
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Old 03-01-21, 09:03 AM
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The Tachyon and R230 are different bikes for different purposes (ie, TT/Tri vs general road, respectively) - both good for their designed purpose, but you should decide what sort of riding you want to do before you go looking for the relevant bike. IMO Ti makes a great used buy - barring obvious trauma, there's very little that can go wrong with a Ti frame from a reputable builder, and LS and Lynskey are two very competent builders. I've had two Lynskey-era Litespeeds, one new and one used, and they have been great - The used one (2000 Vortex bought on eBay in 2003) has been my main road bike for ~18 years and no plans to replace. That being said, a couple of commnts:
1. If you can stretch as far as $2.5k, I'd keep looking for something with more up-to-date tech, ideally clearance for wider tires, capacity for electronic shifting, and disk brakes. There's nothing wrong with tried and trusted tech, but human nature being what it is, you'll get the itch to upgrade eventually, and while Ti might be a "lifetime" frame material, your upgrade options will be limited with older frames.
2. As you rightly point out, bare Ti is as low-maintenance as it gets, but this is a little overblown, IMO - unless you're storing your bike outdoors, somewhere where it's going to get kicked around, or by the ocean, frame corrosion is likely never going to be an issue - it's really not with carbon or Al anyway, and a simple application of Framesaver every few years will pretty much negate any issues with a steel frame. Also, your stated goal of a couple of ~30-mile rides/week is pretty light duty that any material will easily handle. I'm not trying to put you off Ti - I personally think it's the best frame material out there - but willingness to consider other frame materials will massively open up your options.

Last edited by Litespud; 03-01-21 at 09:13 AM.
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Old 03-01-21, 10:26 AM
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79pmooney
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I'd advise stepping back. You are a newbie, right? I'm guessing you have not owned a bike that felt like it fit you like a glove. If I'm right - stop! That fit means far more than the material, the look, the weight, the components ...

Bike speed is a combination of available power from the rider, overall aerodynamics, weight, rolling resistance and mechanical resistance. In that picture, aerodynamics includes you and the bike which is by far, you. The easy one to change is your position on the bike. Big differences but it also affects your comfort and available power. Weight - only the total counts and that is by far - you. And at that, weight only counts - going uphill and adding to your rolling resistance. Rolling resistance is tiny compared to aero unless you are not going fast. It is also easy to change with different tires.) Mechanical - keep any bike in good running condition, bearings and chain lubricated and you are close to as good as you are going to get.

That leaves power. A huge factor. Power isn't just the max you can achieve for X minutes at extreme discomfort. Real power is what you can transfer to the pedals and therefore the road while enjoying the bike for the riding you do. And what dictates this power level? How comfortable you are while in a position to be reasonably aerodynamic.

Now - titanium - compared to comparable steel - is about a pound lighter. A nicer feel, yes, but the upgrade in feel isn't radical if talking comparable bikes. (If you are 160 pounds and the bikes you are comparing are 20 and 19 pounds, you are talking about a weight change of 0.56%. 20 seconds on a record rate climb of Mt. Washington.) But that power thing - let's say bike 1) allows you to put out 2% more power in full comfort and control than bike 2). That's 2% all the time. Guess what? Bike 1) is a fun ride! You come alive every time you get on it because it just "feels right".

The big danger of getting a whiz-bang bike as your first good one - you don't know yet what good fit is for you. That takes riding. A good pro fitter should be able to get you close but he probably cannot do more no matter how good he is. Not in one sitting. As you ride, you will change. You will get more flexible. (Or you will age and go the other way.) What works now will not be the best down the road. That is a near certainty.

So - if you get too fancy a bike as your first - money-wise, material-wise, eye-stopper-wise, the big danger (and one I have witnessed many times) is that you will be unable to look past that bike's failings. You will be unable to see that a lesser bike that fits you better and better matches the engine - you - will do you better. But if you start on that lesser bike and you gradually "grow out of it", spending the bucks for a bike that fits better is easy to justify! Say you now know the handlebars should be 2 cm further forward. Now you can look at those two ti bikes and buy the one that does that. Easy!

Fit rules. Being able to test ride bikes counts for a lot. Yes, not everyone is in a place where they can do that, especially in this pandemic. All the more reason not to spend every last penny on a dream bike but save a few $$s so you can replace stems and seats to dial in what you get. (Stay away from bikes with propitiatory gear like seat masts, stems, handlebars ... You want to know all that stuff BEFORE you even look at those bikes.)

Ben
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Old 03-01-21, 03:03 PM
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Totally agree with 79pmooney. If you really are new to road bikes, you don't have enough experience to make an informed decision. Way better to spend less on something less and ride it for a season or two. You'll be way smarter about what you want, how to tell if a bike fits, etc.

I bought my first bike used and rode it for 3 years before I bought a new bike in late 2019. Even though I was not unhappy with my old bike and put a lot of miles on it, I realized how ill-fitting it was for me once I got the new bike and had a fitting from the shop.

Good luck with your search.
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Old 03-01-21, 04:27 PM
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Buying used is harder if you don't know what you want. If you could buy used from a shop they could at least help you get fitted on it and change parts or whatever needed changing.'
The only road bike I bought used (still have it) I changed the bars, stem, seat and post, crank and cassette to make it work.
If you could borrow or rent a bike just to get the feel of the size you want before you buy one, you would have a baseline of measurements.
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Old 03-01-21, 07:35 PM
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Thanks guys for the valuable inputs. Lots of info to digest.
Iíll hold off on the Litespeed for now.

Iíll add a little more info on my intentions for the bike. Unfortunately, my friends and I are just recreational riders (or would the term be cyclers?), and Iíll spend most of the time staring at it in my living....hence, the preference for a titanium frame. I couldnít help it but to slowly change out components just because I can leave things as is (Iím sure some of yíall can relate).

Iím relatively short at 5í6Ē so itís a bit harder finding a frame. Stopped by a lbs and a helpful rider recommend a 50cm frame. I couldnít stop drooling at the Moots on display.

I borrowed a friendís bike for a few rides, Iíll try his other bikes to see whatís a good fit.

Last edited by specie; 03-01-21 at 07:54 PM.
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Old 03-02-21, 02:21 AM
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You could get a Habanero new in about the range you're looking at. They're great to work with, especially if you want something a little different in terms of setup or geometry.
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Old 03-02-21, 06:51 PM
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Originally Posted by specie View Post
Iím a newbie and have been reading this forum last couple weeks. I really like the simple aesthetic of a titanium frame and ease of care. Iím looking to get one ďniceĒ bike and not upgrading frames later on. Not looking to race or ride competitive; more of a decent workout 20-30mi rides 1-2x/week. Would like a compliant bike thatís not too fatiguing. Budget is somewhat flexible < $2.5k
Iíve looked online and seen a Litepeed Tachyon ($800; 9sp Ultegra) and a Lynskey R230 ($1600 10sp Ultegra). I can upgrade the components on the Litespeed if need be. Iíve searched for info online, but can you guys provide some opinions/experience on either or both frames? Should I look into a model?

Thanks
that budget is the sweet spot of new bikes.
​​ why go old...?
many a good used deal at that price..make sure it fits well.
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Old 03-02-21, 07:20 PM
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"Fortunately, my friends and I are guys that like to ride bikes" - Fixed it for you

The Lynskey R230 is more of a classic and forgiving geometry. Is should be your first choice if you find one that fits you. One of the nice things about metal frames compared to carbon fiber frames is they generally come in more sizes for a given model so it can be easier to find 'the perfect size'.
The Litespeed Tachyon is a Tri bike, the geometry isn't really suited to JRA IMO.
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Old 07-07-21, 10:58 PM
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I was on the fence between Litespeed and Lynskey. What tipped the scales for me, what with bike shop backlogs was Litespeed's home delivery ( they use Kitzuma delivery service ). They estimated 4-6 weeks and I got my T5 road in 4 weeks and a couple days. Text updates on progress from Utah - shipper said he had stops in other states. Delivered to my garage. He attached my pedals and did a quick bike fit and matched my current ride's setup.
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Old 07-08-21, 07:27 AM
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So many choices but I'd probably look at newer carbon over those. The newer ones are sort of decent but the older ones were not and were a bit too flexy. Litespeed and Dean are basically the same thing now. I have never liked Lynskeys based on experiences my friends have had. As someone said, step back and rethink. You may find a much better bike in that price range.
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