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(Sora vs 105) Need opinion on which to pick from a seemingly close comparison

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(Sora vs 105) Need opinion on which to pick from a seemingly close comparison

Old 05-09-21, 10:29 PM
  #26  
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for 200 diff, 105 all day
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Old 05-09-21, 10:35 PM
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Have never cared for sora, just too cheaply made so 105 even with rim brakes. Will echo those who say the new tiagra, in my experience it is just a 1 cog less 105 quality group and the new set has impressed me. I didn't care for previous iterations of Tiagra but they've really made the 4700 set work well.
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Old 05-09-21, 10:56 PM
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The key is to toss the wire-bead tires after a test ride and install some folding tires instead.
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Old 05-10-21, 08:02 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir View Post
Yes but it would be relatively simple to upgrade the non-105 components to 105 components when the budget allows.
Sure, but the resulting bike will have far more money put into it than if the OP delayed purchase and saved to buy the same model of that bike at a higher tier level with a full 105 group on it.

Maybe the OP could sell the stuff they take off, but then they have to work to find a buyer for used components that are already considered cheap components.

That's why I'd go for the cheaper Sora bike at the start. I view the cheaper non-Shimano components as being better than the non-Shimano components on the 105 bike.

Then I'd start a fund for my next bike which will have better stuff on it. What stuff, I don't know, depends on what my riding of the current bike tells me I lack, need or want.

After 3 to 10 thousand miles, which might be 1 year to 3 years of riding. I think any novice rider will have enough of their own cycling experience to begin to answer their own questions.

Last edited by Iride01; 05-10-21 at 08:07 AM.
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Old 05-10-21, 08:24 AM
  #30  
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I'd go for the 105 without a doubt.

I'd also save up more money to get a model with 105 AND hydraulic disc brakes if it's an option.
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Old 05-10-21, 01:19 PM
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So talked to the store and although they agree that the 105 is better they think the sora version might better for me personally as it doesn't have quick release wheels and will be more firm. I'm 6'2 and was decently built at the start of the whole covid thing and weight a little over 200lbs (91kg). Any thoughts on this? Should a larger sized rider still be fine on quick release/a bit less firmness?
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Old 05-10-21, 02:12 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by MakeX View Post
So talked to the store and although they agree that the 105 is better they think the sora version might better for me personally as it doesn't have quick release wheels and will be more firm. I'm 6'2 and was decently built at the start of the whole covid thing and weight a little over 200lbs (91kg). Any thoughts on this? Should a larger sized rider still be fine on quick release/a bit less firmness?
I don't think it will make that much difference in stiffness. Until recent years, most bikes were QR and were plenty stiff. That said, one way to think about it is whether you plan to keep this bike long term or not. If so, you could get the Sora bike, ride it for a bit, and upgrade parts as you are able. Shifters, derailleurs, crank and a cassette could be a gift to yourself next year if you are riding enough. Alternatively, the 105 bike cannot be upgraded to disc brakes if you wanted to one day. On the other hand, you could probably pick up a decent pair of used wheels for rim brakes if you get serious - most new bikes are disc, and those who upgrade to a disc frame will have less use for those rim brake aero wheels.

All that to say. If you don't plan to make any changes in the near future to either bike, I think the 105 is a better deal. If, on the other hand, you might be interested in keeping this bike long term and might do upgrades as you are able, I could make a good argument for Sora. Really, though, I could make a good case for either one :-)
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Old 05-11-21, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by MakeX View Post
So talked to the store and although they agree that the 105 is better they think the sora version might better for me personally as it doesn't have quick release wheels and will be more firm. I'm 6'2 and was decently built at the start of the whole covid thing and weight a little over 200lbs (91kg). Any thoughts on this? Should a larger sized rider still be fine on quick release/a bit less firmness?
That translates to "we can't move the sora at that price".

Get the 105.
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Old 05-11-21, 06:55 AM
  #34  
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Another vote for the 105. I'd slap some Kool Stop salmon pads on the brakes. Surprised at the difference they make on my rim brakes.
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Old 05-11-21, 02:43 PM
  #35  
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105 for sure

I've got Sora on my gravel bike and 105 on my road and Tri bike.

While the Sora is an excellent groupset the problem is that it doesn't play nicely with any other groupset. Unless you're going to go back and start playing with Dura Ace/Ultegra from the 1990's So you're options on parts are pretty much limited to what Sora offers. For example Sora double cranksets are only 50/34 and only come in 165/170/175mm lengths. Things like that limit your ability to upgrade as things wear out or you feel the need to splurge.

With 105 being 11 speed you can use parts from GRX, Ultegra, and Dura Ace if need be. It also makes swapping things around much easier. If I want to move components like cassettes between my Tri bike and my Road bike it's a pretty simple swap.

Just my thoughts
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Old 05-11-21, 03:05 PM
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I'd pick the 105 with the understanding that the rims will now be considered wear items. So in a few seasons you'll need to account for a new wheelset.

Really, there is nothing "wrong" with Sora. If you are on a budget, it's the more economical option; both short & long term.

I've never known anyone to get home & throw their bike in the trash because their shifter wasn't as posh as one they might've coulda had.

I'm reminded of the scene in "The Tiny Prince" where the boy wants a picture of a sheep drawn. And the sketch artist draws several sheep & none meet the boy's expectations. So, the artist draws a box, adds a few airholes to the sketch & tells the boy the sheep is in the box. The boy loves it & says it is exactly the sheep he was looking for.
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Old 05-11-21, 09:10 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by MakeX View Post
So talked to the store and although they agree that the 105 is better they think the sora version might better for me personally as it doesn't have quick release wheels and will be more firm. I'm 6'2 and was decently built at the start of the whole covid thing and weight a little over 200lbs (91kg). Any thoughts on this? Should a larger sized rider still be fine on quick release/a bit less firmness?
That makes no sense, what do they mean by more firm? So is the Sora bike a thru-axle or just have cheap bolt-on wheels? A disc frame with thru-axle does mean it has a greater potential for future upgrades but experience as taught me that a cheaper frame with upgraded parts still isn't the same bike as those same parts on the higher end frame. I have an old frame that was RSX equipped (Sora before the name was changed) and for sentimental reasons it has been upgraded over the years, it still isn't all that fast.
QR levers will work just fine under a 200lb rider, when I was younger and my road bike had more horizontal dropouts I did put down enough power on a slightly worn skewer to tear the drive side out and bend the rim on the frame, seen others do the same on old bikes. Dropouts have been vertical for a couple decades now and I've never seen a rider rip a wheel out of a vertical dropout and I doubt its possible. The QR doesn't support the rider so weight doesn't matter there either. QR has held firm under some of the most powerful riders in the pro peloton, if they were firm enough for them they'll be firm enough for you. Just remember, rare is the person who says "I wish I owned a cheaper bike", get the nicer one and it'll be a longer while before you need to wish for something nicer.
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Old 05-11-21, 10:37 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Russ Roth View Post
That makes no sense, what do they mean by more firm? So is the Sora bike a thru-axle or just have cheap bolt-on wheels? A disc frame with thru-axle does mean it has a greater potential for future upgrades but experience as taught me that a cheaper frame with upgraded parts still isn't the same bike as those same parts on the higher end frame. I have an old frame that was RSX equipped (Sora before the name was changed) and for sentimental reasons it has been upgraded over the years, it still isn't all that fast.
QR levers will work just fine under a 200lb rider, when I was younger and my road bike had more horizontal dropouts I did put down enough power on a slightly worn skewer to tear the drive side out and bend the rim on the frame, seen others do the same on old bikes. Dropouts have been vertical for a couple decades now and I've never seen a rider rip a wheel out of a vertical dropout and I doubt its possible. The QR doesn't support the rider so weight doesn't matter there either. QR has held firm under some of the most powerful riders in the pro peloton, if they were firm enough for them they'll be firm enough for you. Just remember, rare is the person who says "I wish I owned a cheaper bike", get the nicer one and it'll be a longer while before you need to wish for something nicer.
yeah its a thru axel instead of a quick release, which i could see adding a bit of firmness but based on the reactions im thinking it shouldnt be a noticeable difference?
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Old 05-12-21, 01:14 AM
  #39  
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These?

https://www.thebikezone.com/2022-leg...ne-1-2021.html

https://www.thebikezone.com/2022-leg...une-1-202.html
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Old 05-12-21, 08:54 AM
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Personally, I'd rather get a decent aluminum framed bike from a well known brand, than a cheap carbon one: you'd get better components, for a start.

Whats the reputation of these carbon frames? Are they made well?
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Old 05-12-21, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by znomit View Post
That translates to "we can't move the sora at that price".

Get the 105.
Originally Posted by Doomrider74 View Post
Personally, I'd rather get a decent aluminum framed bike from a well known brand, than a cheap carbon one: you'd get better components, for a start.

Whats the reputation of these carbon frames? Are they made well?
yeah those you linked are the ones, its a Canadian bike builder
I dont know if other parts of the world are having similar issues but bike shops in the province are having huge supply delays and really low stock. Its like half 105 and then the rest seems like bit more generic supplier brands that hopefully are borderline mid tier and will be fine and not cause too many issues for a beginner until i can slowly upgrade to complete the 105 set eventually.

Last edited by MakeX; 05-12-21 at 01:19 PM. Reason: added info
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Old 05-13-21, 03:46 PM
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Toray T700G isn't a high-modulus carbon fiber. It's a relatively inexpensive, bulk fiber mainly intended for scale use (like holding tanks and airframes).
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Old 05-15-21, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
Really, there is nothing "wrong" with Sora. If you are on a budget, it's the more economical option; both short & long term.

I've never known anyone to get home & throw their bike in the trash because their shifter wasn't as posh as one they might've coulda had.
If you're on a budget, saving $200 with Sora could add a nice seat pack and tool roll. Or save the difference -- any bike you ride regularly will need maintenance eventually.

Originally Posted by eduskator View Post
I'd also save up more money to get a model with 105 AND hydraulic disc brakes if it's an option.
I agree, and also think disc brakes will be easier to maintain and find replacement wheels for in the future -- though there is a reliable buyers market of used high-spec road wheels. Quality parts are nice all around, if you can save for them, but putting off a bike purchase means miles-not-ridden. If increasing the budget in the short-term isn't an option...



Originally Posted by Doomrider74 View Post
Personally, I'd rather get a decent aluminum framed bike from a well known brand, than a cheap carbon one: you'd get better components, for a start.

Whats the reputation of these carbon frames? Are they made well?
Originally Posted by sfrider View Post
Toray T700G isn't a high-modulus carbon fiber. It's a relatively inexpensive, bulk fiber mainly intended for scale use (like holding tanks and airframes).
A Giant Contend is around the same price and includes a Shimano crankset, among other details.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/contend-ar-3-2021
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