Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Gravel bike with road tyres or Road bike with gravel tyres

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Gravel bike with road tyres or Road bike with gravel tyres

Old 05-18-21, 01:57 AM
  #76  
HTupolev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Seattle
Posts: 4,140
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1906 Post(s)
Liked 1,170 Times in 568 Posts
Originally Posted by Islas View Post
Finally, I'm not sure 32 tyres are enough for gravel?
Depends entirely on the gravel. It's hard to answer this in any meaningful way without riding in your area and knowing what sorts of the available gravel you're intending to ride on.

Some well-groomed compacted hardpack roads are genuinely smoother than most paved roads. Like:



There are some potholes here, but otherwise, this would be pretty fine even on 20mm tires at ludicrously high pressure.

On the other hand, here's a forest road made from large aggregate, which has not yet been well-compacted by logging trucks:



Even on my 2.1" tires it was pretty rough going.
HTupolev is offline  
Likes For HTupolev:
Old 05-18-21, 04:15 AM
  #77  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,595
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1708 Post(s)
Liked 1,841 Times in 1,172 Posts
I think you have a pretty good list there. Canyon and Giant are always good quality and value for money. I would likely go with one of those with a 105 group set. Maybe go for the one with the most tyre clearance. The Giant Contend AR has clearance for 38 mm. Sounds ideal to me. The 32 mm tyres it ships with might even be enough for all your needs.

I think I would want enough clearance for at least 35 mm tyres for maximum versatility.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 05-18-21, 10:56 PM
  #78  
mruneedahelmet
Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 37

Bikes: Ritchey Road Logic 2.0 (2017), Concorde Prestige (199?)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
I've been romancing getting a gravel bike too; everything between buying something in a showroom and throwing the parts bin at my derelict mountain bike. Of course putting the fattest tires I can on an old roadie is also a consideration. For me the issue is more the function than the form.

My definition of gravel riding is frustratingly vague. It's a combination of trails I have hiked and thought "I could ride this without a proper mountain bike", and dirt roads I've never gone down. I really don't know what it entails or if I'll actually enjoy it until I try it. Which makes investing in it a real hurdle. As was mentioned earlier, it involves a lot of the inconveniences of mountain biking - something I gave up years ago.

I know I love the efficacy of road cycling, and the efficiency of a dedicated road bike. If I had to repurpose a bike for gravel riding, it wouldn't be my fast machine. I've trashed enough bike parts and suffered enough injuries on off road adventures to make that mistake. Much like mountain bikes, I think gravel bikes will age poorly and maybe in a few years we will see the secondary market flooded with these gravel bikes that are neither fast on the road nor competent on trails.
mruneedahelmet is offline  
Likes For mruneedahelmet:
Old 05-18-21, 11:50 PM
  #79  
Islas
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mruneedahelmet View Post
I've been romancing getting a gravel bike too; everything between buying something in a showroom and throwing the parts bin at my derelict mountain bike. Of course putting the fattest tires I can on an old roadie is also a consideration. For me the issue is more the function than the form.

My definition of gravel riding is frustratingly vague. It's a combination of trails I have hiked and thought "I could ride this without a proper mountain bike", and dirt roads I've never gone down. I really don't know what it entails or if I'll actually enjoy it until I try it. Which makes investing in it a real hurdle. As was mentioned earlier, it involves a lot of the inconveniences of mountain biking - something I gave up years ago.

I know I love the efficacy of road cycling, and the efficiency of a dedicated road bike. If I had to repurpose a bike for gravel riding, it wouldn't be my fast machine. I've trashed enough bike parts and suffered enough injuries on off road adventures to make that mistake. Much like mountain bikes, I think gravel bikes will age poorly and maybe in a few years we will see the secondary market flooded with these gravel bikes that are neither fast on the road nor competent on trails.
I have the same worry that's why I kinda lean towards the option with road bike with gravel tyres. Because in the end I'll have a "normal" road bike after all. At the same time as people have been mentioning here and even throwing some pictures with most of these bikes I think if you detach the wheels it's hard to know the difference if it was gravel or endurance road bike.
Islas is offline  
Old 05-18-21, 11:59 PM
  #80  
mruneedahelmet
Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 37

Bikes: Ritchey Road Logic 2.0 (2017), Concorde Prestige (199?)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 7 Posts
If you are comfortable with endurance geometry on and off road, then it would be a sensible choice. I for one prefer more aggressive geometry and a shorter wheelbase on pavement. Simply swapping wheelsets on my road bike would not be sufficient to make it comfortable for riding on trails. This touches on the point of having a bike that is mediocre at two things, vs. a bike which is built for two distinct purposes.

There is also the consideration of wear and tear on components. I would not want to muck up my Ultegra drivetrain or crack my carbon handlebars while riding trails.
mruneedahelmet is offline  
Old 05-19-21, 01:08 AM
  #81  
Islas
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by mruneedahelmet View Post
If you are comfortable with endurance geometry on and off road, then it would be a sensible choice. I for one prefer more aggressive geometry and a shorter wheelbase on pavement. Simply swapping wheelsets on my road bike would not be sufficient to make it comfortable for riding on trails. This touches on the point of having a bike that is mediocre at two things, vs. a bike which is built for two distinct purposes.

There is also the consideration of wear and tear on components. I would not want to muck up my Ultegra drivetrain or crack my carbon handlebars while riding trails.
Yea with the aero frame of Propel Advanced and rather low avg speeds I feel like those guys, every school had at least one, that had the best, most expensive football gear (shoes, outfit...) but just couldnt play football at all I feel I'm sacrificing comfort (it's definetely race'y geometry) for ... well nothing, looks maybe. Or at least I hope that going down from it to endurance road bike I won't be doing minus 2km/h on average But people here say that's not the case.

My original post on this forum was about going endurance frame to help back pain, majority of responses back then was that it's not worth it (one of the reasons I didnt go for it), my lower back is a bit better now, but at the back of my head I still hope endurance frame + wider tyres will help me ride for longer
Islas is offline  
Old 05-19-21, 11:19 AM
  #82  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,595
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1708 Post(s)
Liked 1,841 Times in 1,172 Posts
Originally Posted by Islas View Post
I still hope endurance frame + wider tyres will help me ride for longer
For sure it will! They don't make endurance bikes for nothing. Even pro level road race bikes are starting to get a bit taller, longer, slacker, with more tyre clearance and generally more comfortable.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 05-24-21, 06:45 AM
  #83  
Islas
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quick question: if I choose a disc brake bike and want to have a second set of wheels, I can just buy any wheels and attach a disc to them or how do I come about that?
Islas is offline  
Old 05-24-21, 07:11 AM
  #84  
prj71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: North Central Wisconsin
Posts: 3,971
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2462 Post(s)
Liked 843 Times in 552 Posts
Originally Posted by Islas View Post
Quick question: if I choose a disc brake bike and want to have a second set of wheels, I can just buy any wheels and attach a disc to them or how do I come about that?
You have to buy a wheelset that accepts a rotor on the hub. Either 6 bolt or center lock.
prj71 is offline  
Likes For prj71:
Old 05-24-21, 07:39 AM
  #85  
Islas
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks, any recommendation for a more road-like wheelset that accepts discs and is under 500 euro?
Islas is offline  
Old 05-24-21, 07:57 AM
  #86  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: TC, MN
Posts: 39,052

Bikes: R3 Disc, Haanjo

Mentioned: 352 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20367 Post(s)
Liked 9,080 Times in 4,502 Posts
Originally Posted by Islas View Post
Thanks, any recommendation for a more road-like wheelset that accepts discs and is under 500 euro?
Fulcrum are a pretty safe bet. They have a number of options, so look through them for the combination of price/weight/depth/width that you're comfortable with.
WhyFi is online now  
Likes For WhyFi:
Old 05-24-21, 10:48 PM
  #87  
Mosman12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 22
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Road bike with road tires , gravel bike with gravel tires !
Mosman12 is offline  
Old 05-24-21, 11:20 PM
  #88  
Islas
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Maybe a stupid question, but if I buy a second set of wheels, attach the disc to them, will they always fit into the brake caliper? I mean it's pretty narrow
Islas is offline  
Old 05-25-21, 07:03 AM
  #89  
primov8 
V8s all day
 
primov8's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: A Yankee in Houston, TX
Posts: 1,037

Bikes: State Bicycle Co. Undefeated Track SS/FG, Eddy Merckx Strada, Lynskey R500 frameset... waiting for Campagnolo wireless.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 180 Times in 82 Posts
I got my Alex RXD6 wheelset from Merlin Cycles. A great road, but also a gravel capable wheelset that is also tubeless ready.

Merline does have several db wheelsets in your price point. You might even be able to buy new rotors as well and still stay within 500 euros.
__________________
"I may think I have inalienable rights to be alive and happy but I don't - life is a blessing." -Terrence McNally
primov8 is offline  
Old 05-25-21, 07:07 AM
  #90  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: TC, MN
Posts: 39,052

Bikes: R3 Disc, Haanjo

Mentioned: 352 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20367 Post(s)
Liked 9,080 Times in 4,502 Posts
Originally Posted by Islas View Post
Maybe a stupid question, but if I buy a second set of wheels, attach the disc to them, will they always fit into the brake caliper? I mean it's pretty narrow
Rotors should roughly align but, as you note, the tolerances are pretty slim, so there's a chance of some brake pad rubbing on one set or the other. If that's the case, you can fiddle with it a little bit each time you change wheels or you can go for a permanent fix.

Fiddly: take the wheels out, grab a slim lever/blade to slip between the pads and slowly/gently push the pads/pistons back in to the calipers. Put the other wheels on, pump the brake levers until the pads are back in position. If you're not going to swap wheels very often, this isn't too much of a pain in the butt.

Permanent: align the caliper to the rotor that's the further out of the two and then shim the other rotor outwards to match. You'll need the proper shims for the rotor, either 6-bolt or CenterLock, or some people will make their own shims cut from aluminum beer/soda cans. If you're going swap wheels frequently, I'd opt for this method.
WhyFi is online now  
Likes For WhyFi:
Old 06-01-21, 03:05 AM
  #91  
Islas
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Status update in case you wonder:

I've bought Scott Speedster 10 Disc 2020 (slightly used, but looks brand new). The clearance is quite wide, it sits on Schwalbe One 30 (original ones) now, I think it should easily fit 32/33 maybe bigger. I paid 1200 euro.
Firstly it's absolutely beautiful. I had 2 rides already, first a short one and second a bit longer
Ironically on both rides I clocked my personal best since 1y/1.5y in terms of avg speed, probably the confirmation bias got into my head too much
Impressions? I got no lower back pain on neither of the rides not even discomfort, but got terrible wrist pain instead and weirdly going from 25 to 30 tyre doesn't appear much more comfortable, maybe 7 bars is too much for the tyre, I'll try 5-6 next time.

It has the same groupset as my Propel but feels like it's working much worse, maybe it's because it hasn't been ridden much? Don't know. Cables in the frame are rattling like crazy, in Propel the cables didn't do that. There's a trick I heard to address that with zips.

Overall I'm happy with the purchase, still need to test it on gravel once I have 2nd set of wheels.

Thanks everyone for comments!

Islas is offline  
Old 06-01-21, 06:18 AM
  #92  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,595
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1708 Post(s)
Liked 1,841 Times in 1,172 Posts
Yeah, I would drop the tyre pressure. 30 mm tyres don't need 7 bar and not surprised they would be uncomfortable at that pressure. Dropping them to 5.5 bar will make a big difference to comfort.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 06-01-21, 06:49 AM
  #93  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: TC, MN
Posts: 39,052

Bikes: R3 Disc, Haanjo

Mentioned: 352 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20367 Post(s)
Liked 9,080 Times in 4,502 Posts
Yeah, 7 bar is way too high, unless you're pretty heavy. I'm about 82kg and run my 28mm tires at about 4bar (but I'm on some wide rims [23mm internal width]). Check with the Zipp tire pressure calculator for a good starting point on the pressure that you should be running - https://axs.sram.com/guides/tire/pressure
WhyFi is online now  
Old 06-01-21, 07:31 AM
  #94  
scottfsmith
I like bike
 
scottfsmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: Merry Land USA
Posts: 511

Bikes: Roubaix Comp 2020

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 209 Post(s)
Liked 217 Times in 142 Posts
Congrats on your new bike!

To figure out the max size gravel tire you can take, insert long Alan wrenches into the tightest spot with the 30mm tires mounted to see what the clearance is now. The biggest wrench that fits in the tightest spot on the frame is your clearance. It will probably be something like 8mm. For gravel riding I would suggest a minimum of 4mm clearance but everyone has their own view on that.. 2-6mm is where nearly all opinions lie and 4mm is a nice median. So, supposing you in fact have 8mm clearance on your 30's, you can take +4mm on each side which is 30+4+4 = 38mm. To be safe I would knock it down to 700x35c, tires don't exactly measure out to their number on the side. Also if your gravel rims are wider internally (some gravel rims are like that), the same tire will sit wider on those rims. On my gravel rims they are 4mm wider internally than my road rims and they add a couple mm to the tire width.

Oh, and for 35c gravel tires you really don't want them at 7 bar! You want more like 2.5bar there assuming average weight.
scottfsmith is offline  
Old 06-01-21, 08:43 AM
  #95  
Kapusta
Advanced Slacker
 
Kapusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 5,706

Bikes: Soma Fog Cutter, Surly Wednesday, Turner 5-Spot, Canfielld Tilt

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2545 Post(s)
Liked 2,214 Times in 1,245 Posts
Originally Posted by Islas View Post
....weirdly going from 25 to 30 tyre doesn't appear much more comfortable, maybe 7 bars is too much for the tyre, I'll try 5-6 next time.
There is little point in going to larger tires if you don’t drop the pressure as well.

The tire volume itself is almost irrelevant to comfort and traction. it is the lower pressures that they allow you to run that gives you the benefits.

I am 175 lbs, and ran just roughly 4 bar front / 4.5 bar rear when I had 32mm tires. Lower than that I ran into rim strikes and pinch flats on potholes and uneven pavement.

I would suggest a starting pressure, but without knowing your weight it would be a useless guess.
Kapusta is offline  
Old 06-03-21, 01:59 AM
  #96  
Fox Farm
Senior Member
 
Fox Farm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Prague, Czech Republic
Posts: 2,727

Bikes: Merlin Extra Light, Orbea Orca, Ritchey Outback,Tomac Revolver Mountain Bike, Cannondale Crit 3.0 now used for time trials.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 119 Post(s)
Liked 47 Times in 30 Posts
Originally Posted by tomato coupe View Post
I couldn't disagree more. My wife has a road bike (Alchemy Atlas) that also does very well as a gravel bike. I have a gravel bike (Cervelo Aspero) that works very well as a road bike.
Perhaps but I have to say that my Ritchey gravel bike, as wonderful as it is, even with some road tires on it (I typically run 700 x 38 Schwable G-One), is not the same as my Orbea Orca road bike (carbon wheels tubular tires 700 x 25) when it comes to being fast and doing all of the things that a good road bike does. I one time took the Orca on some gravel specific trails and it was like wearing high heals rather than hiking boots, so to speak.
Fox Farm is offline  
Old 06-03-21, 10:08 AM
  #97  
tomato coupe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 3,578

Bikes: Colnago, Van Dessel, Factor, Cervelo, Ritchey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2261 Post(s)
Liked 3,913 Times in 1,583 Posts
Originally Posted by Fox Farm View Post
Perhaps but I have to say that my Ritchey gravel bike, as wonderful as it is, even with some road tires on it (I typically run 700 x 38 Schwable G-One), is not the same as my Orbea Orca road bike (carbon wheels tubular tires 700 x 25) when it comes to being fast and doing all of the things that a good road bike does. I one time took the Orca on some gravel specific trails and it was like wearing high heals rather than hiking boots, so to speak.
No one is claiming than every road bike will work as a gravel bike, or that every gravel bike will excel as a road bike. The statement I was disagreeing with was:
One bike will either suck badly at one thing or suck for both.
Do your bikes suck at one or both things?
tomato coupe is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.