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-   -   Moved to new house with large hill (https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycling/1232224-moved-new-house-large-hill.html)

InvertedMP 06-07-21 11:26 PM

Moved to new house with large hill
 
So I just moved into a new house and there is a significant hill to get to the house from where I normally ride. Itís not super long but the gradients are high and after a long ride on the flats, Iím beat. My bike has 12 speed 48/35 up front and 10/33 on the back. Gearing wise, is there a change I can make that will attack a fairly steep but not super long climb after I am tired from riding?

Dean V 06-07-21 11:50 PM

Mtb pedals and shoes.
Then walk up it.

znomit 06-08-21 01:18 AM

How come cycling terrain was not #1 on your location requirements?

ps
HTFU

pps
One of the fastest guys I know lives at the top of a killer hill. Give it time, they get smaller every time you climb them.

SoSmellyAir 06-08-21 02:00 AM


Originally Posted by InvertedMP (Post 22092691)
So I just moved into a new house and there is a significant hill to get to the house from where I normally ride. Itís not super long but the gradients are high and after a long ride on the flats, Iím beat. My bike has 12 speed 48/35 up front and 10/33 on the back. Gearing wise, is there a change I can make that will attack a fairly steep but not super long climb after I am tired from riding?

First, congratulations on moving to a house on top of a "significant hill"; the view must be excellent, and thus worth the climb, for which you may consider a 10-36 cassette:

SRAM Force XG-1270 12-Speed Cassette | Competitive Cyclist

If the 36T sprocket is not enough, then install even smaller chain rings (46/33, or even 43/30):

X-Range Gearing | SRAM

Otherwise, consider reducing the distance elsewhere to save more energy for the final climb back home. If none of the above works, fake a mechanical and ask your significant other to pick you up.

SoSmellyAir 06-08-21 02:02 AM


Originally Posted by znomit (Post 22092716)
How come cycling terrain was not #1 on your location requirements?

ps
HTFU

pps
One of the fastest guys I know lives at the top of a killer hill. Give it time, they get smaller every time you climb them.

It probably was. Like Eddy Merckx sort of said, don't buy upgrades, buy a house on top of a hill.

Kabuki12 06-08-21 06:41 AM

I bought my house on top of a hill 24 years ago and still walking for the last segment of the ride. I ride vintage steel racers and have just accepted it with a 41 small chainring and a 28 large cog. At my age it’s ok . If I switchback I can make it part way sometimes but after 35-45 miles I would rather walk. I have made it on a mountain bike or a modern hybrid with some very low gears but I don’t like riding either bike. I gave the mountain bike to a homeless guy and the hybrid just sits in the garage. The three climbs are very steep and there is one that is a challenge even by foot. The other two I can ride One of my neighbors puts his bike in his car and parks at the bottom of the hill and that works for him. As far as living on the flats, I really enjoy the view we have , “ living with the hawks”. I could never go back to not waking up to the sunrise over the mountain tops.

mstateglfr 06-08-21 08:59 AM


Originally Posted by InvertedMP (Post 22092691)
So I just moved into a new house and there is a significant hill to get to the house from where I normally ride. Itís not super long but the gradients are high and after a long ride on the flats, Iím beat. My bike has 12 speed 48/35 up front and 10/33 on the back. Gearing wise, is there a change I can make that will attack a fairly steep but not super long climb after I am tired from riding?

Get a subcompact crank, so not c&v. They come in 46/30.

Also, you ride a 10-33 6 speed cluster?...that doesnt sound right.

Riveting 06-08-21 09:25 AM


Originally Posted by InvertedMP (Post 22092691)
So I just moved into a new house and there is a significant hill to get to the house from where I normally ride. Itís not super long but the gradients are high and after a long ride on the flats, Iím beat.

I also just moved to a home that causes most of my rides to end going up a steep and sustained hill. And even with 34/32, I have issues making it up after a long day in the saddle. So I bought a 1x gravel bike with 40/42, and that did the trick, although with 40/11 I now lose the ability to go DOWN that hill with any kind of speed. Trade-offs.

stevel610 06-08-21 09:36 AM

Congrats on the new house.

Presuming knees aren't an issue I'd keep the current gearing and htfu. As you say, it's just a short hill.

cuevťlo 06-08-21 09:46 AM


Originally Posted by mstateglfr (Post 22093028)
Also, you ride a 10-33 6 speed cluster?...that doesnt sound right.

12 speed, not 6.

https://www.sram.com/en/sram/models/cs-xg-1270-d1

xroadcharlie 06-08-21 09:50 AM


Originally Posted by mstateglfr (Post 22093028)
Get a subcompact crank, so not c&v. They come in 46/30.

Also, you ride a 10-33 6 speed cluster?...that doesnt sound right.

This.

The 46/30 crankset is a popular one for good reason. The 30crank/33 combo is about 1.5 cogs lower then your low gear now. Also you will get stronger climbing that hill, Even after a long ride. While the 46T cog maintains most of your high gear. I agree the 10/33 cassette or freewheel doesn't sound right. 48/30 is an insanely high 130 gear inches. If you are correct about the chainring this change will still be valid. You may need a new front derailleur, not sure if the rear one can accommodate a few extra teeth of take up

jackb 06-08-21 10:02 AM

I have a similar problem, but my hill is so long and steep that it is a day's ride in itself. I bought a nice hitch rack and drive my bike down to a parking lot at the bottom of the hill. My ride starts from there.

mstateglfr 06-08-21 10:07 AM


Originally Posted by cuevťlo (Post 22093103)

The OP said he rides C&V, so i figured the 12sp term was the old way where 2x6= 12sp.
No? Ok. Thats the confusion that happens without a ton of details.


A 46/30 subcompact sounds perfect then since 46/10 as a gearing ratio will be plenty for most people and the 30t ring will help with spinning on the hill.

Edited- I confused myself by merging 2 posters into 1. A different poster said they ride C&V.

OP- just get a drivetrain that has ratios which work for your new riding.

zandoval 06-08-21 10:14 AM

Changing you Cassette and even your crank is the way to go. It's not much considering how much ya need to spend on a new house. Fit it in the budget with the new drapes and throw rugs. Long ago I went to a 34T Bailout gear on my freewheel and a compact crank with a 34T chain ring.

It's embarrassing to admit how much time I now spend in that Bailout gear for sure...

SoSmellyAir 06-08-21 12:16 PM


Originally Posted by mstateglfr (Post 22093028)
Get a subcompact crank, so not c&v. They come in 46/30.

Also, you ride a 10-33 6 speed cluster?...that doesnt sound right.

No, I initially thought that too, but figured out he has a SRAM 2 x 12 setup. In this setup, the front derailleur allows a 13 teeth maximum difference between the two chain rings.

Velo Vol 06-08-21 12:19 PM


Originally Posted by znomit (Post 22092716)
HTFU

/thread

BillyD 06-08-21 12:48 PM


Originally Posted by InvertedMP (Post 22092691)
So I just moved into a new house and there is a significant hill to get to the house from where I normally ride.

You must be a new neighbor of mine. Welcome! :)

Iride01 06-08-21 01:36 PM

How long have you been climbing that hill? You might just need to keep at it for a few more rides. You legs will adapt.

For a short climb, as you said it was, I can't imagine the 35/33 isn't enough.

billridesbikes 06-08-21 01:49 PM

Call your wife and have her come get you.

This is why we got a house in the valley and not in the foot hills (less snow too).

SoSmellyAir 06-08-21 04:58 PM


Originally Posted by UCantTouchThis (Post 22093663)
Maybe take up ping pong instead. :D

Nah, the best part about cycling is that one can do it solo (at one's own schedule) or with others.

jaxgtr 06-08-21 05:30 PM


Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir (Post 22093811)
Nah, the best part about cycling is that one can do it solo (at one's own schedule) or with others.

You can ping pong solo as well...also Tennis...I can't tell you how much time I spent hitting the ball against the concrete wall

sfrider 06-08-21 07:46 PM

Dig deep and ride it. A good step hill is an excellent bonus workout when you're already fatigued.

Barry2 06-08-21 08:38 PM


Originally Posted by billridesbikes (Post 22093526)
Call your wife and have her come get you.

Same problem here.... Bay Area, House on Hill.
Started out using Cleat Covers and walking it... The walk of shame my wife called it.
Really bad day (usually HOT), I have the wife drive the SAG wagon and come get me
I've been known to drive down to the local park with the bike in the back and start from there
I have even taken BART home on occasion.
Be inventive, but don't let it stop you riding, you'll get stronger.

I now bike up it knowing it's going to be a ~300W climb... short but sharp.

Gearing down definitely helped, it takes some research to look up Front/Read derailleurs and how their capacity is specified by the manufacturer.
I changed my cassette last week. went to 11-36 and I'm enjoying it.

If you want specific recommendations, you will need to post exactly what equipment you are currently using.

Mine as an example
RD-R8050-GS Rear Derailleur
FD-R8050 Front Derailleur
R8000 50/34 Crank
PG-1170 11-36 cassette (Yes this cassette is over the Shimano Specs and should not be installed)

Barry


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