Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

So tired after road biking...

Notices
Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

So tired after road biking...

Old 07-13-21, 07:50 AM
  #26  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 19,001
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4247 Post(s)
Liked 3,649 Times in 1,978 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
Update --- so the days I was really tired after riding, I'd attempt to nap. Really just laid out on the couch. After a few hours of dragging a$$, I get to the gym and roll my legs on a black foam roller. I'll spend about 10-15 minutes rolling followed by stretching. Then I'll lift weights (nothing heavy). Deadlift, military press, bench, maybe leg press. When I'm finished in the gym, I'm close to feeling 100%. Mentally and physically. My energy level is way up and stays that way until bedtime.

I don't know much about sport science, but I'm wildly guessing the acid built up in my legs after a ride is causing overall body exhaustion. Rolling, stretching and lifting is helping speed up the removal of the acid. Does this idea hold up with current views in sports science?

I'm going to do a ride tomorrow morning, refuel and relax for an hour and then hit the gym. I'm interested in seeing what my energy levels are like during the rest of the day.
I have found if I deny myself a nap and get up and do things my energy returns to normal, too. Some days, though, that nap still happens later.
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 07-13-21, 07:59 AM
  #27  
TakingMyTime
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Los Alamitos, Calif.
Posts: 2,134

Bikes: Trek 7.4 FX, 5200 & 7700

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 812 Post(s)
Liked 613 Times in 372 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
I'm going to do a ride tomorrow morning, refuel and relax for an hour and then hit the gym. I'm interested in seeing what my energy levels are like during the rest of the day.
I don't ride 12 months a year, so each season it usually takes me a while to build up to 40 mile rides. I pick a comfortable mileage for my first ride and will do that 2 or 3 times. I then start increasing that by about 5 miles every couple of rides and before you know it I'm back up to 40 miles and not feeling too bad when I get through.

Not matter what my level of fitness is, if I try to blast some bigger miles too quickly in my training I will be craving a nap too.
TakingMyTime is offline  
Likes For TakingMyTime:
Old 07-13-21, 08:00 AM
  #28  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 1,634 Times in 1,039 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
Update --- so the days I was really tired after riding, I'd attempt to nap. Really just laid out on the couch. After a few hours of dragging a$$, I get to the gym and roll my legs on a black foam roller. I'll spend about 10-15 minutes rolling followed by stretching. Then I'll lift weights (nothing heavy). Deadlift, military press, bench, maybe leg press. When I'm finished in the gym, I'm close to feeling 100%. Mentally and physically. My energy level is way up and stays that way until bedtime.

I don't know much about sport science, but I'm wildly guessing the acid built up in my legs after a ride is causing overall body exhaustion. Rolling, stretching and lifting is helping speed up the removal of the acid. Does this idea hold up with current views in sports science?

I'm going to do a ride tomorrow morning, refuel and relax for an hour and then hit the gym. I'm interested in seeing what my energy levels are like during the rest of the day.
I doubt this is the root cause of your fatigue. I do no stretching and no rolling and donít have any issues with mountainous 100 mile rides. Not saying those things wouldnít help, but I think they are more of a sidetrack if you are really feeling that tired after riding.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 07-13-21, 09:34 AM
  #29  
aliasfox
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 53 Times in 44 Posts
You say you're riding in NYC - are you riding surface streets, laps of Central Park, or Greenways? Surface streets and greenways have a lot of stop and go, especially if you're trying to keep pace with traffic - sprinting can definitely take it out of you. I laid down 1000 miles last year, almost exclusively on Manhattan city streets - figured it was the best way to get exercise while avoiding riding into other peoples' breath like you would on the Greenway or Central Park. If needed, I could sprint at the same speed as traffic, but it'll definitely take it out of you!

My typical distances are 20-50 miles, with the 50 mile ride being the 9W (Manhattan West Side Greenway, across the GWB, onto 9W, turn around at The Filling Station). For any ride longer than 25 miles, I consider bringing a gel and Clif bar - would rather have and not need than the other way around. The gel (I use SIS/Science in Sport) is good for getting some electrolytes, as I don't like putting Gatorade in my bottles (nasty to clean out). I eat when I get home, and for those longer efforts I'll take a ~45min nap afterwards, followed by a liberal dosing of iced coffee. I actually find it much better to move around for the rest of the day (walking, a light hike) than to lie on the couch, as my muscles seize and make it more difficult to move afterwards.

I would say taking a bit of time to recover after 2-3 hrs of exercise is normal. Take it slow and work your way up to being comfortable with your 40 mile rides. However, if you're still de-energized for hours after a bit of conditioning, it may be time for a checkup.
aliasfox is offline  
Likes For aliasfox:
Old 07-13-21, 10:21 AM
  #30  
scottfsmith
I like bike
 
scottfsmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: Merry Land USA
Posts: 432

Bikes: Roubaix Comp 2020

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 174 Post(s)
Liked 190 Times in 123 Posts
I agree not likely there is a correlation with the post-ride stretch/lift. You might have improved your conditioning already, or something about the ride was less stressful. Hopefully you stopped chugging quite so much water and put in some electrolytes... if you did that could have helped.

The subtext of your remarks (long hard rides right out of the box, lifting weights, etc) is you are a super gung-ho guy. A perfect fit for overtraining.
scottfsmith is offline  
Likes For scottfsmith:
Old 07-13-21, 11:40 AM
  #31  
Andy Somnifac 
Shut up legs.
 
Andy Somnifac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,290

Bikes: Too many.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Liked 171 Times in 84 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
5'9", 163lbs. So leanish. But I can definitely reduce some fat around the waist line (front and back).
You're talking to cyclists. We may not call 163lbs @ 5'9" terribly lean by cycling standards... I'm the same height and you have at least 20 lbs on me.
__________________


Andy Somnifac is offline  
Likes For Andy Somnifac:
Old 07-13-21, 01:09 PM
  #32  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 1,634 Times in 1,039 Posts
I keep seeing loads of references to "naps" here on BF. Now where I live naps are what toddlers need after lunch at nursery. I'm sure they are a great idea, but who has time for a nap? I honestly can't remember the last time I had a sleep during the day. I'm lucky if I get time to even sit down for more than 10 mins in our house. Maybe it's something I'll get to do in retirement?
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 07-13-21, 02:06 PM
  #33  
shelbyfv
Senior Member
 
shelbyfv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 10,039
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2970 Post(s)
Liked 3,754 Times in 1,931 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I keep seeing loads of references to "naps" here on BF. Now where I live naps are what toddlers need after lunch at nursery. I'm sure they are a great idea, but who has time for a nap? I honestly can't remember the last time I had a sleep during the day. I'm lucky if I get time to even sit down for more than 10 mins in our house. Maybe it's something I'll get to do in retirement?
Yes! One of a few benefits of old age. Ride bike, shower, eat, surf or read until the eyelids get heavy, then nap the afternoon away!
shelbyfv is offline  
Likes For shelbyfv:
Old 07-13-21, 02:11 PM
  #34  
genejockey 
Klaatu..Verata..Necktie?
 
genejockey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 10,072

Bikes: Canyon Endurace, 105; Battaglin MAX, Chorus; Bianchi 928 Veloce; Ritchey Road Logic, Dura Ace; Cannondale R500 RX100; Schwinn Circuit, Sante; Lotus Supreme, Dura Ace

Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5431 Post(s)
Liked 5,691 Times in 2,904 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I keep seeing loads of references to "naps" here on BF. Now where I live naps are what toddlers need after lunch at nursery. I'm sure they are a great idea, but who has time for a nap? I honestly can't remember the last time I had a sleep during the day. I'm lucky if I get time to even sit down for more than 10 mins in our house. Maybe it's something I'll get to do in retirement?
For me, naps are exclusively a weekend thing.
__________________
"Don't take life so serious-it ain't nohow permanent."

"Everybody's gotta be somewhere." - Eccles
genejockey is offline  
Old 07-13-21, 02:19 PM
  #35  
Andy Somnifac 
Shut up legs.
 
Andy Somnifac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 1,290

Bikes: Too many.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Liked 171 Times in 84 Posts
Naps are a wonderful thing, and they only get better w/ age.
__________________


Andy Somnifac is offline  
Old 07-13-21, 02:28 PM
  #36  
lyle.coop
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Location: NYC
Posts: 91

Bikes: Canyon Ultimate CF SL Disc, Canfield Balance

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by aliasfox View Post
You say you're riding in NYC - are you riding surface streets, laps of Central Park, or Greenways? Surface streets and greenways have a lot of stop and go, especially if you're trying to keep pace with traffic - sprinting can definitely take it out of you. I laid down 1000 miles last year, almost exclusively on Manhattan city streets - figured it was the best way to get exercise while avoiding riding into other peoples' breath like you would on the Greenway or Central Park. If needed, I could sprint at the same speed as traffic, but it'll definitely take it out of you!

My typical distances are 20-50 miles, with the 50 mile ride being the 9W (Manhattan West Side Greenway, across the GWB, onto 9W, turn around at The Filling Station). For any ride longer than 25 miles, I consider bringing a gel and Clif bar - would rather have and not need than the other way around. The gel (I use SIS/Science in Sport) is good for getting some electrolytes, as I don't like putting Gatorade in my bottles (nasty to clean out). I eat when I get home, and for those longer efforts I'll take a ~45min nap afterwards, followed by a liberal dosing of iced coffee. I actually find it much better to move around for the rest of the day (walking, a light hike) than to lie on the couch, as my muscles seize and make it more difficult to move afterwards.

I would say taking a bit of time to recover after 2-3 hrs of exercise is normal. Take it slow and work your way up to being comfortable with your 40 mile rides. However, if you're still de-energized for hours after a bit of conditioning, it may be time for a checkup.
I normally ride in Prospect park. It's a 20 minute ride from my house to the park. I leave at 530am, so no traffic, no stress. I normally wake up at 5am. The last 2 longish rides were up the west side greenway, morningside drive to the gwb and the other was laps in Central park. So a mix of surface streets, greenway and parks.

Ordered some electrolyte powder and I've got Clif bars. I have done the 9W ride in the past. I might try that on Sunday weather permitting and fully accept that I'll be fatigued.

In the last 30 days I've got a little over 400 miles. So yeah maybe I am overtraining. It's kind of addictive to see the pounds melt off me and almost be able to fit my 155lb summer clothes.

Last edited by lyle.coop; 07-13-21 at 02:49 PM.
lyle.coop is offline  
Likes For lyle.coop:
Old 07-13-21, 02:51 PM
  #37  
aliasfox
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 53 Times in 44 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
I normally ride in Prospect park. It's a 20 minute ride from my house to the park. I leave at 530am, so no traffic, no stress. I normally wake up at 5am. The last 2 longish rides were up the west side greenway to the gwb and the other was laps in Central park. Ordered some electrolyte powder and I've got Clif bars. I have done the 9W ride in the past. I might try that on Sunday weather permitting and fully accept that I'll be a bit fatigued.

In the last 30 days I've got a little over 400 miles. So yeah maybe I am overtraining. It's kind of addictive to see the pounds melt off me and almost be able to fit my 155lb summer clothes.
There's definitely a bit of street riding to get to the West Side Greenway, even if you dive east under the bridges and go past South Street Seaport. Stopping and starting at intersections is definitely a bit harder than steady state.

I would say try the electrolyte powder, especially on hotter, sunnier days. Water by itself doesn't necessarily cut it if you're sweating out large amounts of salts. I laid down 75 miles on two laps of 9W/Palisades Park + a few laps of Central Park one ride a few years back, on a day that ended up in the low 90F/33C range mid-day. By the time I got back to Central Park, I was so tapped out of electrolytes that I spent some ridiculous amount of money at a tourist stand for two bottles of Gatorade. Chugged one right there, filled my bottle with the other - got my body to a place where it could do the last 10 miles of my ride.

Anyway, if you're explicitly riding to lose weight, you will definitely get tired as your body uses up all the glycogen in your bloodstream. However, if you're riding for enjoyment and trying to beat your best times - make sure you're well fueled and properly hydrated and get back to us.

And at 5'10"... I haven't seen 167lbs since high school. And considering how skinny I felt at 171 lbs (a decade ago), I'd say you're perfectly fine. Not everyone can be a 138lbs professional climbing waif.
aliasfox is offline  
Likes For aliasfox:
Old 07-13-21, 04:46 PM
  #38  
SoSmellyAir
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,503

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, Trek FX 2

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 722 Post(s)
Liked 451 Times in 339 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
Yesterday I did 40 miles at 16mph pace with 1000ft of elevation gain. When I got back I ate pasta bolognese and was immediately exhausted. I had to lay down.
Some times a biggish meal immediately after riding makes me more tired. This has happened to me a couple of times during the current heat wave. I ride late in the afternoon to avoid the worst of the heat and make it home just in time to have dinner with my family, and feel extra tired afterwards compared to riding the same route earlier this year.
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Likes For SoSmellyAir:
Old 07-13-21, 06:52 PM
  #39  
big john
Senior Member
 
big john's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: In the foothills of Los Angeles County
Posts: 19,001
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4247 Post(s)
Liked 3,649 Times in 1,978 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I keep seeing loads of references to "naps" here on BF. Now where I live naps are what toddlers need after lunch at nursery. I'm sure they are a great idea, but who has time for a nap? I honestly can't remember the last time I had a sleep during the day. I'm lucky if I get time to even sit down for more than 10 mins in our house. Maybe it's something I'll get to do in retirement?
Retirement is the greatest thing ever!
big john is offline  
Likes For big john:
Old 07-14-21, 02:39 PM
  #40  
Kabuki12
Senior Member
 
Kabuki12's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Ventura County ,California
Posts: 2,159

Bikes: 71 Stella,72 Mondia Special,72 ItalVega Grand Rallye, 73 Windsor Pro,75 Colnago Super,76 Kabuki DF,77 Raleigh Comp.GS,78 Raleigh Pro,80 Moto Gran Sprint,82 Medici Pro Strada

Mentioned: 28 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 501 Post(s)
Liked 1,030 Times in 612 Posts
I ride typically 35 or so mile rides on the weekend and 7 mile lunch rides once or twice a week. I don't get fatigue often and on my weekend rides I add a supplement to my water bottle. I take a granola bar with me but hardly ever eat the whole thing. I will stop about an hour in and stretch , take a couple of bites of the bar and drink some water. I get blood work done every six weeks or so due to a Thyroid condition so I keep an eye on things but usually check out fine. I am 66 , soon to be 67 with low blood pressure and resting heart rate. It is normal for some to get tired , but a full crash may indicate something else , your Dr. can help. It took a year to figure out I had a Thyroid issue as I didn't gain weight as most do , but I felt like hell . I had a heck of a time doing any activity like surfing or cycling without feeling like I was spent. It turns out my Thyroid was not working , my T cels were way off. It is an easy and cheap test but you or your Dr. have to ask for it.
Kabuki12 is offline  
Likes For Kabuki12:
Old 07-16-21, 10:29 PM
  #41  
canklecat
Me duelen las nalgas
 
canklecat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 13,221

Bikes: Centurion Ironman, Trek 5900, Univega Via Carisma, Globe Carmel

Mentioned: 195 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4386 Post(s)
Liked 2,418 Times in 1,568 Posts
Originally Posted by Kabuki12 View Post
...I get blood work done every six weeks or so due to a Thyroid condition so I keep an eye on things but usually check out fine. I am 66 , soon to be 67 with low blood pressure and resting heart rate. It is normal for some to get tired , but a full crash may indicate something else , your Dr. can help. It took a year to figure out I had a Thyroid issue as I didn't gain weight as most do , but I felt like hell . I had a heck of a time doing any activity like surfing or cycling without feeling like I was spent. It turns out my Thyroid was not working , my T cels were way off. It is an easy and cheap test but you or your Dr. have to ask for it.
Ditto, the thyroid thing. I was diagnosed about 20 years ago, but received very little info from my docs. I just took the little pill. It was another 15 years or so before a specialist explained the extensive side effects of an endocrine system disorder on the entire metabolic system.

And after I developed thyroid cancer in 2018 my energy level dropped to practically zero. For awhile I could hardly stumble to the bathroom, let alone ride a bike. Took a long time to get the thyroid supplements up to a level where I could function, and I still need to be re-evaluated often. My endocrinologist just authorized a small 12.5 mcg increase, from 112.5 mcg to 125 mcg, and within a week I felt much better.

I'm 63 now and much fitter than most folks my age. So most doctors tend to disregard our complaints and attribute it to "Well... you're older." If they see a 60something patient who isn't morbidly obese, drinks too much, smokes, etc., they seem to think "Oh, he's healthy, no need to do any lab tests to check for specific problems."

Don't settle for that kind of indifference from medical professionals. Fortunately there are a few who are attentive and do listen to legitimate complaints. But not enough. Unfortunately my GP retired last year during the pandemic -- she was excellent, also a survivor of thyroid cancer and understood what I was asking about. But my new GP seems to be another one of those doctors who see patients as types, categories, rather than individuals. If you're walking eating and pooping, he seems to think there's no need to check on anything else. So I had to find another specialist who recognized the problem.
canklecat is offline  
Old 07-17-21, 11:04 AM
  #42  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,374

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4186 Post(s)
Liked 2,708 Times in 1,887 Posts
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
I'm 63 now and much fitter than most folks my age. So most doctors tend to disregard our complaints and attribute it to "Well... you're older." If they see a 60something patient who isn't morbidly obese, drinks too much, smokes, etc., they seem to think "Oh, he's healthy, no need to do any lab tests to check for specific problems."
Iride01 is offline  
Old 07-17-21, 04:11 PM
  #43  
Bah Humbug
serious cyclist
 
Bah Humbug's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Austin
Posts: 17,924

Bikes: S1, R2, P2

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7259 Post(s)
Liked 2,389 Times in 1,251 Posts
I mean, when I started swimming, a light 60 minute workout would clobber me for four hours, and it was only that short with a pint of Ben & Jerry's after.
Bah Humbug is offline  
Likes For Bah Humbug:
Old 07-17-21, 10:55 PM
  #44  
smashndash
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,397

Bikes: 2017 Specialized Allez Sprint Comp

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 845 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 241 Posts
Not sure how much conditioning will help. I've been riding for a few years now and if I go hard on a longer ride (40-70 miles) I'll be dead tired after. Distance is not a good metric for exertion. You should use something like TSS. Today, the TSS for my 40 mile ride was 222 according to Wahoo. My normal 70 mile ride is around 320. Just to give some rough figures.

Eating a ton the day/evening before (carbo loading), eating during the ride and getting all the sleep you need the night before help a lot IME. Your symptoms generally sound like insulin instability (which I know very little about). From what little I understand, you're not necessarily fatigued, but your insulin spikes from 0 when you start eating after a hard ride, and continues to stay elevated for a while, causing a food coma or sugar crash. There are probably ways to stabilize your insulin levels.
smashndash is offline  
Old 07-18-21, 04:59 AM
  #45  
BCAC
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Central Fl
Posts: 137

Bikes: Argon 18 Gallium, GF 29er, old Trek Madone

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 31 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 29 Posts
I ride 50-70 miles, 4 times a week, at a fast pace. With family obligations, I sometimes don’t get enough sleep at night. If I ride a bit tired, I can maintain my pace and distance, but I’m beat afterwards.The effects are more pronounced in the summer heat here in Florida.

Sleep more.
BCAC is offline  
Old 07-18-21, 11:39 AM
  #46  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 1,634 Times in 1,039 Posts
Originally Posted by BCAC View Post
I ride 50-70 miles, 4 times a week, at a fast pace. With family obligations, I sometimes donít get enough sleep at night. If I ride a bit tired, I can maintain my pace and distance, but Iím beat afterwards.The effects are more pronounced in the summer heat here in Florida.

Sleep more.
Sleep is definitely a key factor with fatigue and recovery. I can get away with poor sleep for one night (usually the night before a big event as I often have to be leaving at 4 am to get to the start line) but if I get poor sleep for several nights and also ride hard then I'm soon in a hole.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 07-19-21, 08:31 AM
  #47  
Erixon84
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
I recently started biking in NYC again. Some background - I have mountain biked for years with some road mixed in. Recently I started road biking about 20miles in the morning. Yesterday I did 40 miles at 16mph pace with 1000ft of elevation gain. When I got back I ate pasta bolognese and was immediately exhausted. I had to lay down. I couldn't sleep, just laid in bed for a few hours and read.

I drank over 70oz of water before, during and after that ride.

Today, same thing 35 miles at 15mph pace, I ate an ommelete and some yogurt. I'm again in bed - really tired. 80oz of water today.

Prior to both rides I eat a bowl of oatmeal and a banana. I'll have a bar on the road.

What can I do to prevent the onset of exhaustion after riding? I was thinking maybe some type of sports drink.

I'd like to ride in the morning and have a normal day.
I used to feel like that. I bought Recoverite from Hammer Nutrition and it helps my legs recover fast overnight. At the beginning long rides will make you feel tired, after a while you get used to it. But try Recoverite.
Erixon84 is offline  
Likes For Erixon84:
Old 07-19-21, 08:31 AM
  #48  
Erixon84
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by lyle.coop View Post
I recently started biking in NYC again. Some background - I have mountain biked for years with some road mixed in. Recently I started road biking about 20miles in the morning. Yesterday I did 40 miles at 16mph pace with 1000ft of elevation gain. When I got back I ate pasta bolognese and was immediately exhausted. I had to lay down. I couldn't sleep, just laid in bed for a few hours and read.

I drank over 70oz of water before, during and after that ride.

Today, same thing 35 miles at 15mph pace, I ate an ommelete and some yogurt. I'm again in bed - really tired. 80oz of water today.

Prior to both rides I eat a bowl of oatmeal and a banana. I'll have a bar on the road.

What can I do to prevent the onset of exhaustion after riding? I was thinking maybe some type of sports drink.

I'd like to ride in the morning and have a normal day.
I used to feel like that. I bought Recoverite from Hammer Nutrition and it helps my legs recover fast overnight. At the beginning long rides will make you feel tired, after a while you get used to it. But try Recoverite.
Erixon84 is offline  
Old 07-19-21, 01:50 PM
  #49  
Broctoon
Super-duper Genius
 
Broctoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Muskrat Springs, Utah
Posts: 1,077
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 462 Post(s)
Liked 295 Times in 176 Posts
I saw this thread title and original post, and I immediately thought of my experience last week.

There's a group ride I try to join every Wednesday night. I don't always make it, but I've been pretty consistent lately. We ride 21 miles on pretty flat terrain. About 15-20 riders start together, but by five or six miles in, we usually separate into multiple groups, with me ending up in the middle or even the slowest group. I never felt too bad about this, because even the slow group averages 17-18 MPH. Last week I was feeling strong and decided to try keeping up with the lead group, about 25 MPH. That didn't last long. I bonked, got dropped, and had to fall in with the middle group, about 21 MPH. Quickly got dropped again. I came in with the stragglers and kept thinking, "Note to self: come next week with more fuel in the tank!" I didn't hydrate enough before this ride (temp was mid-90s), should have carb'ed up a few hours prior, and maybe should have taken some goo or chews to eat around the halfway point.

After this ride I was completely spent, for the rest of the night. I was hungry, thirsty, and fatigued. Again, should have gotten my body prepared better. It's also possible (perhaps... unlikely as it might seem ) that I'm simply not conditioned to keep up with guys this strong. I'll probably keep going with them, but just hang with the 18 MPH group. If I do this for a few months and find it's getting too easy, I can try for a group ride "cat upgrade."

For reference, riding solo I can hold 18 MPH for about 40 minutes, even with a few hills mixed in. So I thought I'd be able to hang with the paceline for an hour going at least that speed. The drafting certainly helps, but it seems my threshold is about 45 minutes, when I'm putting out any kind of strenuous power. (At light to moderate strain, I can go all day.)
Broctoon is offline  
Old 07-19-21, 02:08 PM
  #50  
Troul 
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 5,236
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 1,593 Times in 1,101 Posts
Originally Posted by Broctoon View Post
I saw this thread title and original post, and I immediately thought of my experience last week.

There's a group ride I try to join every Wednesday night. I don't always make it, but I've been pretty consistent lately. We ride 21 miles on pretty flat terrain. About 15-20 riders start together, but by five or six miles in, we usually separate into multiple groups, with me ending up in the middle or even the slowest group. I never felt too bad about this, because even the slow group averages 17-18 MPH. Last week I was feeling strong and decided to try keeping up with the lead group, about 25 MPH. That didn't last long. I bonked, got dropped, and had to fall in with the middle group, about 21 MPH. Quickly got dropped again. I came in with the stragglers and kept thinking, "Note to self: come next week with more fuel in the tank!" I didn't hydrate enough before this ride (temp was mid-90s), should have carb'ed up a few hours prior, and maybe should have taken some goo or chews to eat around the halfway point.

After this ride I was completely spent, for the rest of the night. I was hungry, thirsty, and fatigued. Again, should have gotten my body prepared better. It's also possible (perhaps... unlikely as it might seem ) that I'm simply not conditioned to keep up with guys this strong. I'll probably keep going with them, but just hang with the 18 MPH group. If I do this for a few months and find it's getting too easy, I can try for a group ride "cat upgrade."

For reference, riding solo I can hold 18 MPH for about 40 minutes, even with a few hills mixed in. So I thought I'd be able to hang with the paceline for an hour going at least that speed. The drafting certainly helps, but it seems my threshold is about 45 minutes, when I'm putting out any kind of strenuous power. (At light to moderate strain, I can go all day.)
very very few +20 miles routes for maintaining averages to that MPH. So many breaks, crossings, junk, & unkept areas. Even 10 miles are a chore depending on the time of a ride.
__________________
-Oh Hey!
Troul is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.