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Mirror fabric cools wearer by 5* C

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Mirror fabric cools wearer by 5* C

Old 07-15-21, 12:14 PM
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Seattle Forrest
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Mirror fabric cools wearer by 5* C

I've been wearing a light base layer almost every ride this year, for sun protection. Once I start sweating it isn't really want hotter than wearing short sleeves. A base layer can spread your sweat over a wider area of your body to help with evaporative cooling. That and being light colors to reflect warmth from the sun are the tricks clothing designers have.

Which makes this new technology sound neat and promising:

Human skin, unlike many of the clothes we wear, naturally emits MIR. In 2017, Stanford University researchers designed a fabric that lets MIR from the human body pass directly through it, cooling the wearer by about 3° C. But to work, the fabric had to be very thin—only 45 micrometers, or about one-third the thickness of a lightweight linen dress shirt. That led some researchers to question its durability.

To design a thicker fabric, engineers Ma Yaoguang of Zhejiang University and Tao Guangming of Huazhong University of Science and Technology took a different approach. Rather than letting MIR from the skin pass straight through their fabric, they and colleagues designed a textile that used chemical bonds to absorb body heat and re-emit its energy into space as MIR. The 550 micrometer fabric—made of a polylactic acid and synthetic fiber blend with titanium dioxide nanoparticles scattered throughout—also reflects UV, visible, and NIR light, further cooling the wearer. Even though it looks like a regular shirt, “optically, it’s a mirror,” Tao says.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021...ers-nearly-5-c
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Old 07-15-21, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post

Human skin, unlike many of the clothes we wear, naturally emits MIR. In 2017, Stanford University researchers designed a fabric that lets MIR from the human body pass directly through it, cooling the wearer by about 3° C. But to work, the fabric had to be very thin—only 45 micrometers, or about one-third the thickness of a lightweight linen dress shirt. That led some researchers to question its durability.

To design a thicker fabric, engineers Ma Yaoguang of Zhejiang University and Tao Guangming of Huazhong University of Science and Technology took a different approach. Rather than letting MIR from the skin pass straight through their fabric, they and colleagues designed a textile that used chemical bonds to absorb body heat and re-emit its energy into space as MIR. The 550 micrometer fabric—made of a polylactic acid and synthetic fiber blend with titanium dioxide nanoparticles scattered throughout—also reflects UV, visible, and NIR light, further cooling the wearer. Even though it looks like a regular shirt, “optically, it’s a mirror,” Tao says.

https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2021...ers-nearly-5-c
Titanium dioxide is a good choice. It reflects visible light but has an emissivity approaching unity in thermal infrared wavelengths.

If you really want to radiate away infrared heat, you need a material that emits in the "atmospheric window", where radiation passes through the atmosphere without being absorbed. That's about 8-13 microns. You're probably not going to get that in a fabric, though.
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Old 07-15-21, 06:49 PM
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A Ti jersey? I'm in.
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