Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Would you consider a Specialized Roubaix Sport to lean towards the endurance end?

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Would you consider a Specialized Roubaix Sport to lean towards the endurance end?

Old 08-24-21, 06:53 PM
  #1  
geepondy
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Would you consider a Specialized Roubaix Sport to lean towards the endurance end?

Through no fault of my own, my late model Canoondale Synapse 105 was totaled in an accident. Luckily I came out relatively unscathed. This is considered an endurance bike and I rode it with 700x32 tires. I'm still in good shape but at 58 years old and most rides capping out at about 30 miles, averaging 15 mph, The bike was a pretty good fit for me for someone that still wants a road bike experience but giving up ultimate speed and handing for some comfort. A new one cost $1900 and I got enough insurance money to cover it but of course none available and local bike shop said I could order one and wait a year.

Looking at other online offerings at local shops and as you know, pickings are slim but I see one carried a Specialized Roubaix Sport in my size. At $3200 this is a big step up in price which I would have to consider if I really wanted to spend that much but of course it's a better bike with a carbon frame and hydraulic disk brakes. It also comes with some sort of shock absorbing stem. Good news too is it comes with 700x28 tires and it looks like hopefully the 700x32's might fit. Anybody have experience with this bike? Does it lean towards being more a strictly tight handling road bike or would one consider the specs relaxed enough to put it towards the endurance type end?

Another option is to ride out the year with my 20 year old tried and true Trek 7500 hybrid and see if new and used bike inventory looks more promising in the spring. Think bike inventory will have picked up by then?
geepondy is offline  
Old 08-24-21, 07:06 PM
  #2  
Steve B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 5,448

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel, Specialized Epic Evo

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2221 Post(s)
Liked 963 Times in 560 Posts
If it fits and you can actually find one to test ride, it's a nice bike. I know 2 people that ride with this suspension, like it and have had no issues with it.
Steve B. is offline  
Likes For Steve B.:
Old 08-24-21, 07:31 PM
  #3  
Pizzaiolo Americano 
Pizzaiolo Americano
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Hopefully riding my bike...
Posts: 540

Bikes: 2021 Trek Domane, Bianchi Intenso, Specialized Epic Evo, Surly Ice Cream Truck, Some other stuff

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 286 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 68 Posts
Originally Posted by geepondy View Post
Through no fault of my own, my late model Canoondale Synapse 105 was totaled in an accident. Luckily I came out relatively unscathed. This is considered an endurance bike and I rode it with 700x32 tires. I'm still in good shape but at 58 years old and most rides capping out at about 30 miles, averaging 15 mph, The bike was a pretty good fit for me for someone that still wants a road bike experience but giving up ultimate speed and handing for some comfort. A new one cost $1900 and I got enough insurance money to cover it but of course none available and local bike shop said I could order one and wait a year.

Looking at other online offerings at local shops and as you know, pickings are slim but I see one carried a Specialized Roubaix Sport in my size. At $3200 this is a big step up in price which I would have to consider if I really wanted to spend that much but of course it's a better bike with a carbon frame and hydraulic disk brakes. It also comes with some sort of shock absorbing stem. Good news too is it comes with 700x28 tires and it looks like hopefully the 700x32's might fit. Anybody have experience with this bike? Does it lean towards being more a strictly tight handling road bike or would one consider the specs relaxed enough to put it towards the endurance type end?

Another option is to ride out the year with my 20 year old tried and true Trek 7500 hybrid and see if new and used bike inventory looks more promising in the spring. Think bike inventory will have picked up by then?
My wife owns one. I would absolutely consider it an endurance bike. The 32s will also fit as that is what we have on hers.
Pizzaiolo Americano is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 05:41 AM
  #4  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 1,634 Times in 1,039 Posts
If you get on with the front spring and the fit is good then it could be ideal. It's definitely an endurance bike in a similar vein to your Synapse.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 08-25-21, 09:12 AM
  #5  
oris
I like speed
 
oris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Eastvale, CA
Posts: 178

Bikes: Cannondale SuperSix Hi Mod, Specialized Allez Sprint, Bottecchia Emme 4 SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Liked 72 Times in 47 Posts
It's definitely an endurance bike and should fit 32's. I built one up recently for riding fondos since the other bike is a SuperSix; I end up feeling a bit beaten up after long rides.

Overall the Roubaix is more stable in handling and comfortable, particularly while descending. You don't really notice the Future Shock working unless you're out of the saddle and putting in the watts. The Roubaix isn't a race bike so it lacks the snap in acceleration however it holds speed well and is noticeably less taxing after a long day.
oris is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 09:25 AM
  #6  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,374

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4186 Post(s)
Liked 2,708 Times in 1,887 Posts
Would you consider a Specialized Roubaix Sport to lean towards the endurance end?
Toward the Endurance end? It's an endurance bike just like my Tarmac is. However the Roubaix is less aggressive geometry that will give you more of the relaxed, more upright position that your Cannondale did.

Most everything we call road bikes are endurance bikes. It's only the desired fit that changes. Just because you don't want what is considered a race fit doesn't make them any more or less endurance bikes.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 10:00 AM
  #7  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 1,634 Times in 1,039 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Toward the Endurance end? It's an endurance bike just like my Tarmac is. However the Roubaix is less aggressive geometry that will give you more of the relaxed, more upright position that your Cannondale did.

Most everything we call road bikes are endurance bikes. It's only the desired fit that changes. Just because you don't want what is considered a race fit doesn't make them any more or less endurance bikes.
Well the whole point of an endurance bike is the slightly less aggressive geometry. The Roubaix has a much higher stack than your Tarnac, but the rest of the geometry is fairly race oriented. Obviously it has more vertical compliance too for improved comfort. The pros do actually race this bike, but they have a special version with a lower stack height.
PeteHski is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 10:03 AM
  #8  
Juan Foote
LBKA (formerly punkncat)
 
Juan Foote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Jawja
Posts: 3,990

Bikes: Spec Roubaix SL4, GT Traffic 1.0

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1622 Post(s)
Liked 499 Times in 354 Posts
I have what I recall is a Roubaix Elite? It's a 2013-ish model with the Zertz fittings. It has been tremendously comfortable and I compare it to a Cadillac in regard to the other road bikes I have owned and ridden. Great bikes IMO.
Juan Foote is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 10:13 AM
  #9  
surak
Senior Member
 
surak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,705

Bikes: Specialized Roubaix, Canyon Inflite AL SLX, Priority Continuum Onyx, Santana Vision, Kent Dual-Drive Tandem

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 756 Post(s)
Liked 597 Times in 344 Posts
Definitely worth considering and test riding. Just rode back-to-back 200 kms last weekend on my 2019 Roubaix with Ultegra Di2 on 25mm tubeless tires with only tired legs at the end.
surak is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 10:25 AM
  #10  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,374

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4186 Post(s)
Liked 2,708 Times in 1,887 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
Well the whole point of an endurance bike is the slightly less aggressive geometry. The Roubaix has a much higher stack than your Tarnac, but the rest of the geometry is fairly race oriented. Obviously it has more vertical compliance too for improved comfort. The pros do actually race this bike, but they have a special version with a lower stack height.
So those that ride road bikes for hours and many miles on end with a low stack in a more aero position aren't on a endurance geometry bikes?

BITD I was told that a road bike was an endurance bike and just like color, you picked whether you wanted one with a relaxed fit or a race fit. When mfrs on their websites show less aggressive fit bikes as endurance bikes, it's not because they are the one and only bikes that are endurance. It's more that there is nothing else special about them. And I'm not saying that as a bad thing. It's just that they are the most basic of the endurance geometry bikes
Iride01 is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 11:59 AM
  #11  
aliasfox
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Liked 53 Times in 44 Posts
Geometry-wise, it's definitely on the Endurance end. That said, definitely test ride it. I rented a Roubaix Comp Di2 back in 2019, and it wasn't really the bike for me - ambivalent about the disc brakes, not used to the Di2, but really, really, disliked bobbing up and down on the suspension stem. I'm sure if I had more than a day with it, I would've been able to adjust my pedal stroke to be more compatible, but not so much with one 40 miler.

But if the bike shop says its available, go test ride it and let us know what you think!
aliasfox is offline  
Likes For aliasfox:
Old 08-25-21, 02:32 PM
  #12  
Pizzaiolo Americano 
Pizzaiolo Americano
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Hopefully riding my bike...
Posts: 540

Bikes: 2021 Trek Domane, Bianchi Intenso, Specialized Epic Evo, Surly Ice Cream Truck, Some other stuff

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 286 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 68 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
So those that ride road bikes for hours and many miles on end with a low stack in a more aero position aren't on a endurance geometry bikes?
No...
Pizzaiolo Americano is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 02:35 PM
  #13  
Iride01
MotuekaCascadeChinook
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 10,374

Bikes: '20 Tarmac Disc Comp '78 Raleigh Competition GS

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4186 Post(s)
Liked 2,708 Times in 1,887 Posts
Originally Posted by yarbrough462 View Post
No...
But you aren't able to give any reasoning and justification. Just that like others I would have to blindly accept that you actually know anything.
Iride01 is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 02:40 PM
  #14  
Pizzaiolo Americano 
Pizzaiolo Americano
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Hopefully riding my bike...
Posts: 540

Bikes: 2021 Trek Domane, Bianchi Intenso, Specialized Epic Evo, Surly Ice Cream Truck, Some other stuff

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 286 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 68 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
But you aren't able to give any reasoning and justification. Just that like others I would have to blindly accept that you actually know anything.
Accept what you want. You have been riding for quite a while it looks. If you think that there is no difference between a bike with race or endurance geometry, I don't know what to tell you...Endurance geometry bikes don't have low stack. It is their main defining trait...That and a steep head tube angle. I suspect you already know this and just want to argue though...

Last edited by Pizzaiolo Americano; 08-25-21 at 02:43 PM.
Pizzaiolo Americano is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 03:10 PM
  #15  
teejaywhy
Senior Member
 
teejaywhy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: AZ
Posts: 250

Bikes: 2018 Specialized Roubaix Expert; 2018 Breezer Thunder Expert

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 123 Post(s)
Liked 96 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
So those that ride road bikes for hours and many miles on end with a low stack in a more aero position aren't on a endurance geometry bikes?
If you ride your Tarmac on gravel roads, is it a gravel bike?
If you ride your Tarmac in a triathon, is it a tri bike?
If you ride your Tarmac on single track, is it a mountain bike?
etc...
teejaywhy is offline  
Likes For teejaywhy:
Old 08-25-21, 03:21 PM
  #16  
redcon1
Senior Member
 
redcon1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: South Central PA
Posts: 519

Bikes: Gary Fisher X-Caliber, Focus Arriba, Specialized Roubaix Expert

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Liked 72 Times in 47 Posts
Iride01 has been peddling the same 'all bikes are endurance bikes' BS since he purchased his Tarmac. I just laugh and don't bother responding to his ridiculous generalization any more. By the way, it doesn't help to reason with him, provide geometry charts, etc. to point out the differences-- he just continues with his ridiculous assertions regarding road frame geometry.

Hopefully the OP, and others who have asked about endurance geometry, see right through his ridiculous logic straight away also. Unfortunately for BF, he seems to have a lot of time on his hands to post about things he knows little about.
redcon1 is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 03:44 PM
  #17  
geepondy
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 67
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Thanks for the sage advice thus far. Another issue is the frame size. The available bike is 54cm and at 5'10", I think 56cm is more suitable. My friend said you can compensate for frame differences somewhat by changing the stem, etc.
geepondy is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 04:04 PM
  #18  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 1,634 Times in 1,039 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
When mfrs on their websites show less aggressive fit bikes as endurance bikes, it's not because they are the one and only bikes that are endurance. It's more that there is nothing else special about them. And I'm not saying that as a bad thing. It's just that they are the most basic of the endurance geometry bikes
That is an odd way of looking at it I must say. Race bikes are optimised more for speed and sharp handling, while endurance bikes are optimised more for comfort and stability. It's as simple as that. Bikes like the Synapse and Roubaix are not in any way "basic". They are just a little less aggressive in their geometry and compliance to make long distance riding a bit more comfortable - and as a consequence usually faster for most riders. Of course you can ride long distances on a race bike, but some are harsher than others - especially full-on aero rigs.
PeteHski is offline  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 08-25-21, 05:43 PM
  #19  
DBT
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by geepondy View Post
Thanks for the sage advice thus far. Another issue is the frame size. The available bike is 54cm and at 5'10", I think 56cm is more suitable. My friend said you can compensate for frame differences somewhat by changing the stem, etc.
I am about the same height as you (5' 11"). I think we roughly straddle the 2 sizes. I purchased a 54 Roubaix in 2013 and have ridden it many miles. Yesterday, I took delivery of a 56 Aethos. I'm still dialing in the fit, but it feels good so far. I only have about 10 miles on it so far. Plan to stretch it legs this weekend.
DBT is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 06:32 PM
  #20  
Pizzaiolo Americano 
Pizzaiolo Americano
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Hopefully riding my bike...
Posts: 540

Bikes: 2021 Trek Domane, Bianchi Intenso, Specialized Epic Evo, Surly Ice Cream Truck, Some other stuff

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 286 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 68 Posts
Originally Posted by geepondy View Post
Thanks for the sage advice thus far. Another issue is the frame size. The available bike is 54cm and at 5'10", I think 56cm is more suitable. My friend said you can compensate for frame differences somewhat by changing the stem, etc.
When you are between frames sizes, you need to consider your intended use for the bike. The smaller bike will require a more aggressive riding position because you will have more seat to bar drop and less stack to begin with. If you are racing the bike or pretty flexible, this may be a good thing. If not, you may not be able to get as comfortable on the bike as you would like. If you are reasonably young and fit, your body may adapt to the aggressive riding position over time though...Go to this site to see what the differences in the frame sizes are:
Geometry Geeks

Last edited by Pizzaiolo Americano; 08-25-21 at 06:35 PM.
Pizzaiolo Americano is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 06:50 PM
  #21  
NJgreyhead
Senior Member
 
NJgreyhead's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: South Jersey near PHL
Posts: 697

Bikes: Frequently

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Liked 182 Times in 90 Posts
I have a 56cm Roubaix (2013, pre- future shock) and a 32" pants inseam (height is 5'10"+). Don't think I'd fit on a 54cm bike.
It came with 25s, and I run it with 28s. Would like to go with 30s or 32s, but can't.
Still, I like my bike a lot, and never feel bike envy.
NJgreyhead is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 07:13 PM
  #22  
KiwiDallas
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Liked 31 Times in 15 Posts
I'd been riding a 2005 Specialized Roubaix Elite Triple for many years before I finally took delivery this year of a 2021 Roubaix Sport. It's a terrific bike. The FutureShock stem is wonderful and the entire ride is just what I wanted. Like you, I ride a hilly 20-mile course at average 15 mph. I'm more interested in overall comfort than razor handling so I was looking for the endurance rider design.

My thoughts on the Roubaix Sport: New Bike Day (after 9 months of delay)

My only concern for you is the frame size. I'm your cohort (age and height, I'm a little taller and a little older). The Roubaix Elite I used to ride was a 56 and since I got the Sport in a 58 frame size, I realize that at 6-foot-1 I was really a 58 all along.

So the 54 might possibly be small for you at 5-foot-11. I would guess you're a 56. Don't let the simple availability of the bike in 54 sway you - it's an expensive bike and you need to get it in your size. It's worth waiting for.

It only took me 9 months to receive mine in the correct size ... see thread at More delays in new road bike order. The new normal? ... but the Roubaix Sport was worth every day of the wait.

=K
KiwiDallas is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 07:16 PM
  #23  
Kabuto
Senior Member
 
Kabuto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Far East
Posts: 244
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 156 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 41 Posts
Originally Posted by DBT View Post
I am about the same height as you (5' 11"). I think we roughly straddle the 2 sizes. I purchased a 54 Roubaix in 2013 and have ridden it many miles. Yesterday, I took delivery of a 56 Aethos. I'm still dialing in the fit, but it feels good so far. I only have about 10 miles on it so far. Plan to stretch it legs this weekend.
Interesting you ride a 54 Roubaix. I would have thought a 56 would be more appropriate for your height, especially considering its endurance oriented geometry. Do you use a longer than standard stem to ensure enough reach??
Your 56 Aethos has about the same amount of stack as your 54 Roubaix (565mm vs 563mm) but a lot more reach (395mm vs 380mm). At 392mm, even my 58 Roubaix (2020 model) (for reference I'm 6' and have a 36" cycling inseam) has a shorter reach than your 56 Aethos.

Last edited by Kabuto; 08-25-21 at 07:19 PM.
Kabuto is offline  
Old 08-25-21, 09:51 PM
  #24  
SoSmellyAir
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,503

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, Trek FX 2

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 722 Post(s)
Liked 451 Times in 339 Posts
Originally Posted by aliasfox View Post
I rented a Roubaix Comp Di2 back in 2019, and it wasn't really the bike for me - ambivalent about the disc brakes, not used to the Di2, but really, really, disliked bobbing up and down on the suspension stem.
I felt the same way when I shopped for my first road bike in 2017. I test rode the carbon versions of the Synapse, Roubaix, and Domane, and was weirded out by the Future Shock of the Roubaix and the Isospeed of the Domane.
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 08-26-21, 05:56 AM
  #25  
PeteHski
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 3,232
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Liked 1,634 Times in 1,039 Posts
Originally Posted by geepondy View Post
Thanks for the sage advice thus far. Another issue is the frame size. The available bike is 54cm and at 5'10", I think 56cm is more suitable. My friend said you can compensate for frame differences somewhat by changing the stem, etc.
Definitely don't buy it if it is too small. Unless you have particularly short arms then a 56 cm is likely to fit you much better. The only thing in favour of the Roubaix in smaller sizes is the relatively high stack. If you prefer a bit more saddle to bar drop then you might just get on with the 54 cm frame. But only if the reach is still long enough for you and it might well not be.
PeteHski is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.