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Roval Alpinist CLX vs Zipp Firecrest wheels

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Roval Alpinist CLX vs Zipp Firecrest wheels

Old 09-29-21, 04:00 PM
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Amelio 
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Roval Alpinist CLX vs Zipp Firecrest wheels

Does anyone know these two wheel sets and if so could you explain the difference? Is there a better wheel out of the two?

I think the Roval Alpinist CLX is not tubeless capable

the zipp 303 firecrest is tubeless only.

They both claim to be light weight but I havenít done a lot of research to see which one is lighter or the better wheel, or does that really depend on what youíre looking for?
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Old 09-29-21, 04:10 PM
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Hookless and tubeless only vs not tubeless compatible is, by far, the biggest difference between the two (though, to be clear, with the Zipps, it's tubeless tires only - you can still stuff a tube in to the tubeless tire (but why would you want to do that?)].

If that rather significant difference doesn't tip you one way or the other, I'd probably wait until your have a better idea of what you're after... or look at other wheels that keep both options open.
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Old 09-29-21, 04:20 PM
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im looking at a bike that came with the rovalís from factory but guy swapped them out with the Firecrestís. Iím just wondering if was an upgrade downgrade (weight-wise) that he just wanted tubeless wheels?

Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Hookless and tubeless only vs not tubeless compatible is, by far, the biggest difference between the two (though, to be clear, with the Zipps, it's tubeless tires only - you can still stuff a tube in to the tubeless tire (but why would you want to do that?)].

If that rather significant difference doesn't tip you one way or the other, I'd probably wait until your have a better idea of what you're after... or look at other wheels that keep both options open.
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Old 09-29-21, 04:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Amelio View Post
im looking at a bike that came with the rovalís from factory but guy swapped them out with the Firecrestís. Iím just wondering if was an upgrade downgrade (weight-wise) that he just wanted tubeless wheels?
The weight difference between the two of them is irrelevant in the context of the aforementioned tubed v tubeless difference. I would assume that, like me, he was already sold on/experienced with tubeless, most likely due to regular/frequent punctures, and decided to go with the Firecrests over the stock Rovals for that reason.

If you're considering buying the bike with one of the two sets of wheels, you should be looking at how frequently you flat and how much that bothers you. The Rovals would be the more traditional choice. The Firecrests would be the choice if the time, effort and frustration of fixing flats on the roadside is greater than the time, effort and frustration of learning how to set-up and maintain tubeless tires.
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Old 09-29-21, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Amelio View Post
im looking at a bike that came with the rovalís from factory but guy swapped them out with the Firecrestís. Iím just wondering if was an upgrade downgrade (weight-wise) that he just wanted tubeless wheels?
Most people would consider the Zipps an upgrade. The reason somebody would buy wheels like that is that they're very aerodynamic, and fast as a result. Weight isn't considered terribly important for this type of gear. Tubeless is a controversial subject, I think it's great but you'll be limited in what tires you can use. For the most part you can only use good or great tires with those wheels, and you'll notice it every few thousand miles when you buy them.
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Old 09-29-21, 04:57 PM
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I would think he almost certainly ditched the Rovals simply because he wanted to run tubeless. I would have done the same.
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Old 09-30-21, 06:55 AM
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Agreed.. once you are in the tubeless groove you tend to want to stay there. Personally I would not buy a bike with those Roval CLX wheels, then I would have the hassle of selling a useless set of wheels.
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Old 09-30-21, 09:12 AM
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You guys have answered all my questions, thanks gentlemen! I'm a little confused with WhyFi's "The Firecrests would be the choice if the time, effort and frustration of fixing flats on the roadside is greater than the time, effort and frustration of learning how to set-up and maintain tubeless tires." I think that means more flats with tubes vs learning curve with tubeless? Adding sealant seems like a messy bit of hassle. I had tubeless on a 2002 s-works, no sealant back then, and those tires leaked like a sieve!

I just like to pump my tires up to their max, they just roll better, and I don't find the ride jarring at all. So when I see the max pressure of the Firecrest's at 72.5psi I wonder how they can roll as well as a tire at 80, 100, or 120. All the videos I've watched explain it all, that lower pressure means less fatigue which translates to more power available to ride. But their tests don't seem to include a power meter, would love to see those.

The weight is only 140g between the two brands, so not a big deal there at all. The Firecrest will only take a 28mm as the narrowest tire, again, not really an issue with everything going wider. The max is 50mm on the Zipp's, again, that's nice.
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Old 09-30-21, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Amelio View Post
I'm a little confused with WhyFi's "The Firecrests would be the choice if the time, effort and frustration of fixing flats on the roadside is greater than the time, effort and frustration of learning how to set-up and maintain tubeless tires." I think that means more flats with tubes vs learning curve with tubeless? Adding sealant seems like a messy bit of hassle. I had tubeless on a 2002 s-works, no sealant back then, and those tires leaked like a sieve!
Correct. Some people get very few flats so, for them, tubeless is more work than addressing those flats. For those that get more frequent flats (and don't want to ride ****** armored tires), maintaining tubeless can be far, far less work and hassle.

Whatever experience you had in 2002 isn't going to apply here. If you want to add/remove sealant quickly and easily, get a sealant syringe with tube that'll fit all the way down the valve stem and in to the tire. Something like this or this.

In terms of pressure (max pressure is *not* the answer), you'll also want to at least familiarize yourself with stuff like suspension losses. If you've got ~40 minutes and the inclination, there's a good Cycling Tips Podcast on the subject.
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Old 10-02-21, 08:44 AM
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thanks Wi-Fi youíve been really helpful. Thanks to your info and all the helpful comments from others I decided to get the zipps. (sometimes I get overwhelmed by all the great info n posts and feel I am not crediting someone for some useful info!)


so I think Iím running too many psi for my weight. Iím now 165lbs/6í and Iím using zippís site to dial in the pressure. I tentatively said it for 70 but I think Iím about 10 psi too high. Iím not sure which side wall type to choose. For now Iím going to put 60 as it seems the range is 57 to 60.



Does anyone know what side wall type to choose on zippís site?


Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
Correct. Some people get very few flats so, for them, tubeless is more work than addressing those flats. For those that get more frequent flats (and don't want to ride ****** armored tires), maintaining tubeless can be far, far less work and hassle.

Whatever experience you had in 2002 isn't going to apply here. If you want to add/remove sealant quickly and easily, get a sealant syringe with tube that'll fit all the way down the valve stem and in to the tire. Something like this or this.

In terms of pressure (max pressure is *not* the answer), you'll also want to at least familiarize yourself with stuff like suspension losses. If you've got ~40 minutes and the inclination, there's a good Cycling Tips Podcast on the subject.

Last edited by Amelio; 10-02-21 at 09:17 AM.
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Old 10-02-21, 09:18 AM
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you're 100% correct, thank you!

Originally Posted by PeteHski View Post
I would think he almost certainly ditched the Rovals simply because he wanted to run tubeless. I would have done the same.
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Old 10-02-21, 09:21 AM
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You sealed the Scott!
I put my nonsense aside and got the bike with zipps. 😀

Thatís for your bottom-line comment, I needed to hear this.


Originally Posted by scottfsmith View Post
Agreed.. once you are in the tubeless groove you tend to want to stay there. Personally I would not buy a bike with those Roval CLX wheels, then I would have the hassle of selling a useless set of wheels.
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Old 10-02-21, 09:21 AM
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FWIW I have the 303S (which are 2mm narrower than the Firecrest, iirc), and I'm ~182lbs - I'm running 28s in the 56-61psi range, which is right about at what Zipp/SRAM recommends. You can definitely run yours at 60psi or under and still have zero worries about it feeling bouncy out of the saddle or skittish in the corners.
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Old 10-02-21, 09:22 AM
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really appreciate your insight here, I got the zipps!

Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
Most people would consider the Zipps an upgrade. The reason somebody would buy wheels like that is that they're very aerodynamic, and fast as a result. Weight isn't considered terribly important for this type of gear. Tubeless is a controversial subject, I think it's great but you'll be limited in what tires you can use. For the most part you can only use good or great tires with those wheels, and you'll notice it every few thousand miles when you buy them.
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Old 10-02-21, 09:27 AM
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iím duplicating part of my post I did earlier, but I think I need to let 10 lbs out. Iím 165 with 28ís on these tires, sorry for the dupe content, Iím in a replying groove this morning and LOVE MY BIKE! Getting trouble from my wife ďover the last two days itís all about your bike!!!Ē Yep, sheís right! 😍

Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
FWIW I have the 303S (which are 2mm narrower than the Firecrest, iirc), and I'm ~182lbs - I'm running 28s in the 56-61psi range, which is right about at what Zipp/SRAM recommends. You can definitely run yours at 60psi or under and still have zero worries about it feeling bouncy out of the saddle or skittish in the corners.
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Old 10-02-21, 12:20 PM
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Experiment with the pressure. You're not going to pinch flat, but the bike will feel ... squishy when it's too low, especially in corners.

PS - you have an incredibly nice bike. 🙂
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Old 10-02-21, 12:33 PM
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I am 200lbs and ride 28 tubeless at 65F/70R so try taking your pressure down. You'll know when you get it right.
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Old 10-04-21, 03:13 AM
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One thing to note when messing around with pressures is to make sure your pressure gauge is reasonably accurate. A lot of gauges on track pumps etc can be well off (easily +/- 10 psi).
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