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So I ditched 85g butyl for 35g TPU inner tubes

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

So I ditched 85g butyl for 35g TPU inner tubes

Old 03-26-22, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by yaw
So with that out of the way, on to the test results: I can't claim to perceive a difference even if you'd pay me in a lifetime supply of plastic to describe the new 'road feel' and 'acceleration boost'. My average speed was slightly up, but then again I think I had two fewer dog leashes than usual stretched across the river bike path on this careful test run.

Now I am curious - who here has gone TPU, what do you have to say about it, and can we get any anecdotes regarding long term reliability?
Stiff but compliant.
Aero-solid.
Agile yet stable.

That about does it.
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Old 03-27-22, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by tempocyclist
In the event of a puncture, a Latex tube can sometimes be a real pain to install by the roadside. You have to be far more careful than when just whacking in a regular butyl tube. Just something to consider.

I run Latex tubes on my TT bike, but for the spare tube(s) I carry a Conti Race Light.
This. I run latex tubes full time on the road, but carry a butyl spare. In the rare occasion I get a puncture, I don't want to have to take the time to mount a latex carefully on the side of the road (then when I get home, I swap back to latex). FWIW, I've never had an issue mounting a latex at the house, just talc it and take a few extra minutes to make sure it's not pinched under the bead, pretty easy. Rolling resistance beats weight savings, every day, all day. But I can def see carrying a TPU tube for a spare, and I'm thinking about doing the same, just to save space in the saddle bag.
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Old 03-27-22, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Rides4Beer
just to save space in the saddle bag.
Neither my saddle bag nor my tool bottle (the latter is what I generally use) have enough space to carry two performance butyl tubes along with the other bits. With TPU I can comfortably carry two and roadside installation is not an issue. I haven't had a flat on them yet, but just going off the initial installation at home. I think they are ideal for spares no matter what primary tube (or no-tube) is run.
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Old 08-17-22, 03:34 PM
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So light you can pack two in place of one butyl

I can now carry two spare TPU tubes instead of one butyl which can get me home in a pinch. I also carry one TPU, one C02 and a tire lever as my race repair kit.
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Old 04-01-24, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by seypat
I think the ribbed latex ones give a more pleasurable ride experience.
I am late to the game…but I am still waiting for lambskin tubes.
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Old 04-01-24, 12:39 PM
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Two years later and I now have TPU on several bikes. Paired with nice 23-25mm open clinchers, it almost feels like nothing at all.
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Old 04-01-24, 12:44 PM
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Originally Posted by tFUnK
it almost feels like nothing at all.
Wait, are you sure you're using these right?
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Old 04-01-24, 04:19 PM
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Originally Posted by rm -rf
They roll up very small, I think. I have a Michelin ultra light butyl, folded into a long oval that's the length of my small saddle bag, so it packs efficiently.

Saddle bag wear
I've seen two saddle bag spares that went flat soon after replacing a punctured tire. They had been in the saddle bag for many months or years, and the folded edge got enough wear to make it a weak point. The hole was like a snakebite slit, but all rough and abraded along the edge of the slit.

I wrap my spare in a piece of Tyvek from an old overnight envelope to protect it. (It's been in there a couple of years now.)
Well, there's your problem! You're not riding through enough broken bottles on the roadside!
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Old 04-02-24, 05:51 PM
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my wife would argue latex does not make me faster.

Have not tried TPU tubes yet. Don’t care for aliexpress and my local shops want 30 bucks for one tube. Honestly would like to make my emonda and madone tubeless. Havnt decided yet.
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Old 04-02-24, 08:43 PM
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The Park Tool self-adhesive patches have worked well on my Pirelli P-Zero TPU tubes. I didn't use any alcohol, but did rough up the tube with the little sandpaper square Park gives you.
My experience with TPU has been fine so far.
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Old 04-02-24, 09:27 PM
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Rene Herse Cycles claims that a lot of the slow leakage of the TPU tubes is due to plastic stems that deforms when the metal valve core gets screwed in leading to space and thus leakage. Of course, that's because they're coming out with a line of (slightly heavier) TPU tubes with metal stems.
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Old 04-03-24, 12:07 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I've been thinking about buying a Tubolito as an emergency back-up spare (I run tubeless) simply because they are lighter and less bulky than butyl tubes. Relatively expensive though for something I will probably never use!
I have a Tubolito for emergency for my tubeless tires in case of sidewall or non-plug able offenses. Takes next to no room in saddle bag.
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Old 04-03-24, 04:56 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
I have a Tubolito for emergency for my tubeless tires in case of sidewall or non-plug able offenses. Takes next to no room in saddle bag.
On the flip side, it seems that you're not supposed to use CO2 cartridges with TPU, so in an emergency you're back to old-school having to use and bring a pump. And since you're tubeless especially, the pump is going to be a really seldom-needed item.
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Old 04-03-24, 05:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene
On the flip side, it seems that you're not supposed to use CO2 cartridges with TPU, so in an emergency you're back to old-school having to use and bring a pump.
Tubulito says you can:
https://www.tubolito.com/faq/
Where people claim there is a problem it is either the quick burst on initial inflation or the quicker bleed down over time. The former can be avoided with some care if your inflator has a decent trigger valve and the latter isn't a huge deal.
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Old 04-03-24, 09:41 AM
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I have been running RideNow 36g and even 19g TPU tubes for 2 years now with two flats and one that had a defective valve. At sub $12 now via Amazon per tube, I am not sure why you would pay up for a Tubolito at like $30 and I am not sure why you would run latex since these are heavier, larger, and cost as much as a Tubolito plus the rolling resistance data doesn't really matter at 15mph or greater and the ride quality can be adjusted via running lower pressures and or using larger tires. I can run two spare TPU tubes in a tiny .41L Silca saddle bag. The tubes save so much space I have room for an electronic portable pump, patch kits, two coin cell batteries, an SRAM AXS battery, and a multitool.
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Old 04-03-24, 09:47 AM
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I would suggest getting a small portable hand pump but I personally use a portable mini electric pump that fits right into my saddle bag with two TPU spares and a bunch of other stuff

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...e?ie=UTF8&th=1
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Old 04-03-24, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Jrasero
I would suggest getting a small portable hand pump but I personally use a portable mini electric pump that fits right into my saddle bag with two TPU spares and a bunch of other stuff

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...e?ie=UTF8&th=1
So get the tiny TPU tubes but throw a pump in your pocket?
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Old 04-03-24, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by staehpj1
Where people claim there is a problem [with inflating TPU with CO₂] it is either the quick burst on initial inflation or the quicker bleed down over time. The former can be avoided with some care if your inflator has a decent trigger valve and the latter isn't a huge deal.
I don't know why there would be a problem inflating TPU with CO₂. If it inflates butyl and latex fine, why not TPU?

Single datum: I have inflated TPU with CO₂ on the roadside, and nothing asploded.
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Old 04-03-24, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by terrymorse
I don't know why there would be a problem inflating TPU with CO₂. If it inflates butyl and latex fine, why not TPU?

Single datum: I have inflated TPU with CO₂ on the roadside, and nothing asploded.
No idea, but saw this: https://forums.thepaceline.net/showp...3&postcount=65
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Old 04-03-24, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene
"The high pressure and cold temperature (as the CO2 expands) can split the tubes."

Ah yes, a cold blast of CO₂ also can freeze butyl tubes, causing them to burst at the valve stem. Ask me how I know.
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Old 04-03-24, 06:24 PM
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So maybe it is a good idea to tak it a little slow when filling with co2, but as mentioned above at least one brand blesses co2 with no caveate.
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Old 04-04-24, 04:17 AM
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Originally Posted by bampilot06
my wife would argue latex does not make me faster.
This is a tubeless situation my friend.
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Old 04-04-24, 06:18 AM
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I think it's time to declare myself an old curmudgeon. I've tried lots of new stuff, but I plan to stick with carrying a pump and using butyl inner tubes for the rest of my life.
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Old 04-04-24, 09:59 AM
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I’ve ridden on 700x28 Conti GP5000 tires with 36g RideNow TPU tubes for about 8 months now. No complaints. This setup replaced heavier tires and butyl tubes for a total weight savings of 230 grams. Maybe placebo but it feels like there is less force required at the pedal during acceleration.
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Old 04-04-24, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Biker Pete
I’ve ridden on 700x28 Conti GP5000 tires with 36g RideNow TPU tubes for about 8 months now. No complaints. This setup replaced heavier tires and butyl tubes for a total weight savings of 230 grams. Maybe placebo but it feels like there is less force required at the pedal during acceleration.
What you are probably feeling is less rolling resistance on your GP5000 tyres. What heavier tyres did they replace?
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