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How Do you learn to track stand/ ride with no hands?

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Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

How Do you learn to track stand/ ride with no hands?

Old 07-25-05, 07:45 PM
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cocopuffs809
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How Do you learn to track stand/ ride with no hands?

The reason why I want to learn these things?
1) I fell /crashed 3 times on my clipless during a red light and I could not unclipp.
btw..is there a way to loosen the tension for the speedplay x/5's?
So I figure learning to track stand is a good alternative.

2) WHy i want to ride with no hands? Stretch, grab water, etc.

Road Biking is great! I went up Tantulus (a huge mountain) in Oahu, Hawaii..and going down was awesome...especially the turns.. the tight turns...there are many turns in Tantulus, anyways..going up Tantulus was alright, going down was awesome, and the only problem I had was once I was at the foot of the mountain at the red light. I was going at 0MPH and I guess I could pedal very slowly untill the light turns green, but obviously not.. I fell to the left and I was still clipped in. Then to top it off, these people in a car sped by and shouted "AH HAH I SAW THAT.."
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Old 07-25-05, 07:49 PM
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Practice. There was a recent thread about no-handed riding. You have to have *some* speed to keep stable without your hands on the bars. Practice by gradually removing all but one finger from the bar and then take that off and keep peddling.

I've done a horizontal trackstand at a redlight as well. Embarassing, but no damage to me or the bike. I'd take it to a grassy field and just practice.
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Old 07-25-05, 07:55 PM
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Whoah, I thought you wanted to track stand no-handed at the same time

1. Try peddling backwards and use your leg motion and your arms, steering the wheel ever so slightly to keep your balance. In time, hopefully, you won't have to peddle backwards as much. I haven't managed to stay still for too long, but long enough to unclip

2. Riding with no hands is best when you are going downhill and have a wide, straight path in front of you. Then let go, sit upright and use your body to lean into and out of wide, arching turns.

There are definitely other ways of accomplishing these things... Good luck! Stay up!
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Old 07-25-05, 08:04 PM
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What is track standing?
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Old 07-25-05, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Rich22
What is track standing?
The ability to stand perfectly still with both feet still on the pedals. It's an impressive balancing act. Much, much easier on a fixed gear bike then it is on a standard road bike.
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Old 07-25-05, 08:08 PM
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http://www.answers.com/topic/track-stand
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Old 07-25-05, 08:10 PM
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i don't really know what the definition of a "track stand" is but for the most part i just slow down when i see a red light up ahead, i've gotten pretty good at judging them that i'll just pop into my lowest gear, and by the time i get to the light it's just turning green, and i drop my gears into a higher one and get back up to speed. The closest thing to a "track stand" i guess i've done is coming to a stop while still pushing on the pedals, then kinda playing with the handle bars a bit, then turn my pedals backwards, release the brakes and take maybe a 1/4 pedal stroke, my bike might move a foot then hit the breaks again, and repeat. If i know it's a long light, and i didn't slow down in advance (and i hate to unclip) i'll find a telephone pole, light pole, or street light pole that i can just put my hand against.

anyone have a video of a really good track stand, or just something to demonstrate ??
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Old 07-25-05, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by sunninho
ouu!!! thanks!


To do a track stand, place your good foot, or foot you are most comfortable having in front forward. Find a slight uphill and slowly roll to a stop. Turn your front wheel the opposite of your good foot about 45 degrees. Stand up on the pedals and lean forward. If you start to fall in the direction that your wheel is pointing, apply more pressure to the pedals to hold yourself up. If you fall the other direction let pressure off your pedals roll back a few inches. Also you can lean your body the opposite direction you are falling to correct your balance. The most important thing is, practice, practice, and practice!
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Old 07-25-05, 08:28 PM
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here's another article, way more detail http://www.teamestrogen.com/articles/asa_trackstand.asp
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Old 07-25-05, 08:51 PM
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I can track stand way easier on my mountain bike because of the more relaxed geometry. It could also be the fatter tires too.

It takes a lot of practice. Still haven't gotten track standing on the road bike competely down. I can track stand on my mtb fairly well, working on track standing while seated.
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Old 07-25-05, 08:55 PM
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The trick to riding no handed is that you need to lean back and sit up straight, keeping most of your weight centered on the seat. I find that it is hard to ride no handed when I keep my hands near the bars (which at first seems safer since you have the bars in close reach if something goes wrong). You will find, however, that really it is much harder to be leaning forward.
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Old 07-25-05, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by nitropowered
I can track stand way easier on my mountain bike because of the more relaxed geometry. It could also be the fatter tires too.

It takes a lot of practice. Still haven't gotten track standing on the road bike competely down. I can track stand on my mtb fairly well, working on track standing while seated.
Me too. I can sometimes do a pretty decent trackstand on my road bike when I don't have any cargo on me, or if I have a very light load in my messenger-bag style backpack, but when I'm packing the rigid-frame backpack, there's no trackstanding for me at all. Urgh!

No-hands riding for me requires nice, smooth street and modest speed. No hot-rodding, no puttering. Dunno, maybe 12mph-ish? I have no way to really tell how fast I am going most of the time. I'll do a few blocks of no-hands cruising when I am coming back from a particularly long or hard group ride and I need to let my hands have a break and my neck un-kink.

Originally Posted by hmai18
Practice. There was a recent thread about no-handed riding. You have to have *some* speed to keep stable without your hands on the bars. Practice by gradually removing all but one finger from the bar and then take that off and keep pedaling.
That's pretty much how I learned to do it. You definitely need to scootch your butt back further on the seat than you would otherwise do when you are riding normally, otherwise it feels like you're about to tangle your knees up in your handlebars and your balance will be kind of funky. It puts just a bit more weight on that back wheel and makes you steadier, so you don't wobble the front end of the bike.
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Old 07-25-05, 09:25 PM
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I can stay up for about 5-7 seconds or so by using turning the handlebars back and forth. That can kind of bounterbalance your weight swings. I have definately tried to hold on too long though and bitten it hard. this is amusing though to everybody watching so I don't sweat it. it's a public service really.
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Old 07-25-05, 09:29 PM
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I seldom ride no handed, so not much help there. On track stands, I get my cranks parallel to the ground, with my dominant foot forward (left in my case, which ever you would normally kick a ball with is usually dominant foot) I use combination of brakes and slight pedal pressure on lead foot to stay balanced. Try to keep cranks level and lift the foot on the side you are leaning to if you lean. If you need to release brakes and get a bit of forward roll for balance. Try to leave room so that you can roll forward several times if you need to. Takes lots of practice.
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Old 07-25-05, 10:01 PM
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Guy in wheelchair explains how to do a no-handed trackstand

Hope this helps you crash.
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Old 07-25-05, 10:06 PM
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I ride no-handed more than alot of people I think... I need to stretch my back, or eat a powerbar (open it anyway) I'll ride no handed.... sit straight up, and it helps if you have a bike that tracks straight. (i.e. the frame is straight )
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Old 07-25-05, 11:54 PM
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Originally Posted by xbow
I can stay up for about 5-7 seconds or so by using turning the handlebars back and forth. That can kind of bounterbalance your weight swings. I have definately tried to hold on too long though and bitten it hard. this is amusing though to everybody watching so I don't sweat it. it's a public service really.
i can see this in a herky, jerky way! makes for a good laugh!
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Old 07-26-05, 01:02 AM
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The way I learned was by trying and failing a bunch of times.

Practice makes perfect.

Speed definitely helps with the no-handed thing, as the gyroscopic effect of the wheels helps keep you upright and headed straight. That said, no-handed riding can be done at very low speeds (5-6 mph) once you get it down.
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Old 07-26-05, 05:47 AM
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Thanks guys for your advice! Im going to practice them tomorrow. The last time I tried riding w/ no hands.. I was clipped on and right after I took my hands off the pedal I was tipping over, like I was 1/3 way down but amazingly I did something, braked or something so I skided/ drifted instead..that wasy a awesome, and it saved m$$.
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Old 07-26-05, 06:03 AM
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btw, sorry for all the noobie questions, But i figured I better be safe than sorry since I realized that when I look over my shoulder, I swerve 1/5 of the time. Just wondering, I know It just takes practice, but is there a proper way to do this?
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Old 07-26-05, 07:07 AM
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I went to Cirque du Soleil this past weekend at Disney World. One of the acts was an acrobat on a bike jumping around all over the place, climbing stairs and stuff. He took an audience member and made him lie down on the ground, then rode up to him, stoppped, then bunny hopped and landed so that the dude was in between his wheels. It was sweet

Anyway, another part was where he was on a platform with no where to move and he track stood for a minute or so. The bike wasn't even fixed gear. It was so sweet.
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Old 07-26-05, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by cocopuffs809
btw, sorry for all the noobie questions, But i figured I better be safe than sorry since I realized that when I look over my shoulder, I swerve 1/5 of the time. Just wondering, I know It just takes practice, but is there a proper way to do this?
Regarding a technique to avoid swerving when looking over your shoulder, a few years
ago I read this and it's worked for me.

If you're riding and want to look over your left shoulder, first twist your shoulders slightly
so that your right shoulder is pointing in the direction you want to keep moving.
Just distort and stick your right shoulder forward.

After you do that, turn your head left, but maintain the physical focus on keeping your right
shoulder pointing forward. Take the look back/left, then look forward again and re-align your
shoulders.

Although it sounds contortional, it's fairly easy. Once you stick the right shoulder forward, when you
look left you're really not looking OVER your left shoulder, (which is now out of the way) -- you're just looking back and left.

I've probably made this sound way too complex. YMMV.
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Old 07-28-05, 04:28 AM
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I rode no-handed for the first time yesterday ... been too-scared to release finger from bars before, but yesterday I must have ridden for a good 20m (on flat) quite comfortably. I'll gradually increase my distance as my confidence waxes.

As for the track stand - I've only been able to do this properly on a slight incline, since you pedal forward a tiny bit, and gravity pulls you back again ... This rocking-motion makes it really easy (I find, anyway) to maintain balance, and you "rock around the spot". On flat, when you apply pressure on the cranks, you're going to go forward without the option to return to your position, so it's more of a very slow creep than a stand.

G
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Old 07-28-05, 06:07 AM
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I did the slow creep into an intersection yesterday as I waited for a pickup to go through it so i could make a left turn. It was pretty neat.
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Old 07-28-05, 06:28 AM
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i cant track stand and although i can even ride no handed around gentle corners i am not confident enough to start reaching over for food etc i always have my hands close enough to grab on if i start to loose balance which my genraly happen after a while, im sure it does not help that i do it on my mtb on gravle tracks

here some usefull advice...loosen your headset, if its to tight you will not be able to ride with out hands because it will be to stiff to turn form leaning in.
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