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Tubeless road experiences

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Tubeless road experiences

Old 04-11-22, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene
Is this a positive story? Or are you saying if you ran tubes, you would have put one in and run at your normal pressure til you got home? What did you do with the tire after you got home (plug or bacon strip)?
I threw the tire away. The cut was at the age of the tread and sidewall and the tire was toast and would have been even if it was a tubed tire. I made no effort to bacon strip it because I wasn’t carrying any at the time. I could have booted and tubed it to get home but it rode pretty well at 25#.
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Old 04-11-22, 10:18 PM
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Went for a 100k ride this weekend. When I arrived home I wiped down my bike, as I always do. Low and behold there was some dried Orange Seal on the rear stay of my bike. Looks like I rode over something that punctured my tyre on my ride. I didn't even notice, and likely never would have noticed if I hadn't decided to wipe my bike down. For my riding style, tubeless tyres proved their worth right there.
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Old 04-12-22, 05:55 AM
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Originally Posted by NoWhammies
Went for a 100k ride this weekend. When I arrived home I wiped down my bike, as I always do. Low and behold there was some dried Orange Seal on the rear stay of my bike. Looks like I rode over something that punctured my tyre on my ride. I didn't even notice, and likely never would have noticed if I hadn't decided to wipe my bike down. For my riding style, tubeless tyres proved their worth right there.
A common experience for me. In fact, and strangely enough, it happens at about the same frequency as I used to get flats. Crazy, amiright?
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Old 04-12-22, 07:05 AM
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Originally Posted by waters60
I am resurrecting this dead horse…I have been riding Campy Bora tubular wheels for three years with Veloflex Vlaanderen 28 tires. For me at 175 lbs 98 rear and 95 front is the sweet spot. I have a 2020 Super Six which is a very fun responsive bike but the responsiveness comes with stiffness. I have thought about tubeless road wheels to ( theoretically ) ride lower pressure to take some harshness out of the ride without affecting rolling resistance.
Any experiences similar to mine would be appreciated.
You must have really, really good roads for 95psi to be the sweet spot for Vlaanderens. I am a little heavier than you and 75-80 psi tests fastests on my local chip seal roads. Continental GP5000 tubeless or Vittoria Speeds will test quite a bit faster than Vlaanderens. The Vlaanderen tubulars run about as fast as Hearse EL tires. Can's use feel, you have to test.
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Old 04-12-22, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by GhostRider62
You must have really, really good roads for 95psi to be the sweet spot for Vlaanderens. I am a little heavier than you and 75-80 psi tests fastests on my local chip seal roads. Continental GP5000 tubeless or Vittoria Speeds will test quite a bit faster than Vlaanderens. The Vlaanderen tubulars run about as fast as Hearse EL tires. Can's use feel, you have to test.
Not to mention the premise of the question isnt valid. - The idea that you cant ride lower pressure than 95psi, without moving to TL is wrong. He can simply reduce pressure to say 75-80 psi with what ever tyres he already has.
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Old 04-12-22, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Racing Dan
Not to mention the premise of the question isnt valid. - The idea that you cant ride lower pressure than 95psi, without moving to TL is wrong. He can simply reduce pressure to say 75-80 psi with what ever tyres he already has.
True

Tire pressure is a little complicated because road conditions vary and some of us are heavy and many pressure gages are inaccurate. I only go as low as necessary for my conditions. Silca's calculator lines up well with my experience. I run 85-90 psi 25 mm road clincher tires with latex tubes and 80 psi tubeless. If a TT and road surfaces are good, I might go to 100 psi just for that day


https://silca.cc/pages/sppc-pro
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Old 04-12-22, 11:38 AM
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Originally Posted by MinnMan
Debatable. Guy on my ride this morning running tubeless road tires double flatted going over something this morning. Waiting for him to fiddle with his bacon bits or whatnot took freaking forever. I kept thinking "put some tubes in and let's be on our way."

You can always put a tube in a tubeless tire. It takes about 5 seconds longer to unscrew the valve stem than putting a new tube in a regular clincher. Admittedly the sealant makes it a bit messy, but when you consider how many fewer times you flat, I think the convenience factor swings way in favor of tubeless.
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Old 04-12-22, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh
You can always put a tube in a tubeless tire. It takes about 5 seconds longer to unscrew the valve stem than putting a new tube in a regular clincher. Admittedly the sealant makes it a bit messy, but when you consider how many fewer times you flat, I think the convenience factor swings way in favor of tubeless.
Eh....The number of times I've seen somebody flat a tubeless, quickly put a tube in it, and ride on is zero. They seem to resort to tubes only after a long frustrating series of trying to get the tubeless tire back by pumping it up, plugging the hole, trying to pump it back up again, etc. So yeah, in theory you can "just put a tube in it", but that only saves time if you do that right away, before wasting interminable time trying to solve the problem without. So, I'm not buying this one.

Also, particularly for road tubeless, getting the tire back on the rim after inserting a tube can be a horrible task.
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Old 04-12-22, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by MinnMan
Eh....The number of times I've seen somebody flat a tubeless, quickly put a tube in it, and ride on is zero. They seem to resort to tubes only after a long frustrating series of trying to get the tubeless tire back by pumping it up, plugging the hole, trying to pump it back up again, etc. So yeah, in theory you can "just put a tube in it", but that only saves time if you do that right away, before wasting interminable time trying to solve the problem without. So, I'm not buying this one.
That's not a function of the tubeless tire; its a choice of the operator

Originally Posted by MinnMan
Also, particularly for road tubeless, getting the tire back on the rim after inserting a tube can be a horrible task.
Hasn't been my experience if you do it correctly. Completely dislodge the bead on the opposite side, push it to the center channel, and its usually possible to get the tire back on, even without a tire iron.

Also, the way things are going, most new rims are made with the center channel design to be tubeless compatible, so any mounting difficulties are going to be similar whether you're actually running tubeless or not.
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Old 04-12-22, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by merlinextraligh
That's not a function of the tubeless tire; its a choice of the operator
Correct, but pretty meaningless in the face of actual experience. All those advocates convinced of the time-saving virtues of tubeless keep us by the side of the road while they demonstrate how their technology is superior.
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Old 04-12-22, 03:46 PM
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I took my tubed wheels to ride a gravel trail because I heard there would be deep gravel and I didn't want my expensive rims sinking into it. Snake bite as I rode over a lip onto a bridge. I had forgotten what a pain in the ass tubes are. The surface was dirt not gravel, I wouldn't have had to stop if I was on my tubeless wheels.
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Old 04-12-22, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Sy Reene
Is this a positive story? Or are you saying if you ran tubes, you would have put one in and run at your normal pressure til you got home? What did you do with the tire after you got home (plug or bacon strip)?
I think it's a positive story because riding a bike is more fun than fixing one.
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Old 04-12-22, 04:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest
I think it's a positive story because riding a bike is more fun than fixing one.
Eventually the fixing has to happen anyway.. I wouldn't want to do too long of a ride at 20psi, but that's just me I'm sure :-)
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Old 04-12-22, 04:54 PM
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I will try the PM & HR method. Maybe I can quantify rolling resistance. Not super scientific but it would be interesting. Which variable do I want to keep constant? Guessing speed. I can do this on my rollers or use a hill near my house. Up for methodology tips!
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Old 04-12-22, 11:32 PM
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5500 miles with one sidewall cut and one roofing nail in my tubeless. The sidewall required booting the inside of the tire and inserting a tube which took only slightly longer than on with a clincher. The nail, I rode 7 miles on until I got home (lost 5 PSI) and baconed the tire and rode it 7000 miles with no issue. I ride Conti 5000 Tls at 65/70 and I weigh 165 and riding at reduced pressures (used the Silca site calculator) is so much more comfortable.

Seating tubeless helps if you have a compressor handy - and a cheap one can be purchased at Harbor Freight for $50.

After decades of clinchers and tubes and going tubeless 1.5 years ago, I will never go back.
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Old 04-13-22, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by waters60
I will try the PM & HR method. Maybe I can quantify rolling resistance. Not super scientific but it would be interesting. Which variable do I want to keep constant? Guessing speed. I can do this on my rollers or use a hill near my house. Up for methodology tips!
Your smooth and small diameter rollers are not going to provide meaningful information on optimal PSI for your real-world rides. If you really want to pursue this, look in to the Chung Method and/or chit chat with RChung
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Old 04-13-22, 12:37 PM
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Interesting tubeless tire pressure adjustment retrofit to be used by Team DSM at Paris Roubaix this year...
https://www.scopecycling.com/product/atmoz/
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Old 04-13-22, 12:55 PM
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Originally Posted by ctak
Interesting tubeless tire pressure adjustment retrofit to be used by Team DSM at Paris Roubaix this year...
https://www.scopecycling.com/product/atmoz/
Interesting, though the first thing that I did was to check if this was announced on April 1st.

If you look at the photos, you can just see the air line snaking from the hub out to the valve stem. It would be pretty damn cool to be able to adjust on the fly.
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Old 04-13-22, 01:39 PM
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Is that 4000 euros per WHeel??
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Old 04-14-22, 03:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Jack Tone
Is that 4000 euros per WHeel??
I would hope you get 2 for that price
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Old 04-18-22, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by MinnMan
Eh....The number of times I've seen somebody flat a tubeless, quickly put a tube in it, and ride on is zero. They seem to resort to tubes only after a long frustrating series of trying to get the tubeless tire back by pumping it up, plugging the hole, trying to pump it back up again, etc. So yeah, in theory you can "just put a tube in it", but that only saves time if you do that right away, before wasting interminable time trying to solve the problem without. So, I'm not buying this one.

Also, particularly for road tubeless, getting the tire back on the rim after inserting a tube can be a horrible task.
Sounds like you ride with guys who don't know how to plug a tubeless tyre efficiently. I can tell you it's a LOT quicker than changing a tube if you know what you are doing (and it's not even difficult). I like the Dynaplug Racer kit. I keep it loose in my back pocket so I can react quickly if I get a flat (which is rare with sealant anyway).

This is how it goes for me:-

1. Tell tale hissing sound
2. Stop, locate hole from sealant spitting out
3. Put thumb over it
4. Reach in pocket for Dynaplug
5. Punch it through the hole and remove
6. Top tyre pressure back up
7. Ride on

Small punctures usually self heal and don't even notice them.

Also don't have any problem getting tubeless tyres back on my rims. Don't even need plastic levers with the right rim/tyre combo.
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Old 04-18-22, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
Sounds like you ride with guys who don't know how to plug a tubeless tyre efficiently. I can tell you it's a LOT quicker than changing a tube if you know what you are doing (and it's not even difficult). I like the Dynaplug Racer kit. I keep it loose in my back pocket so I can react quickly if I get a flat (which is rare with sealant anyway).

This is how it goes for me:-

1. Tell tale hissing sound
2. Stop, locate hole from sealant spitting out
3. Put thumb over it
4. Reach in pocket for Dynaplug
5. Punch it through the hole and remove
6. Top tyre pressure back up
7. Ride on

Small punctures usually self heal and don't even notice them.

Also don't have any problem getting tubeless tyres back on my rims. Don't even need plastic levers with the right rim/tyre combo.
Yeah, sorry, I'm not buying this one either. It boils down to "I'm an expert, so it works for me, why aren't you and your friends also experts?" No thanks.
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Old 04-18-22, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by MinnMan
Yeah, sorry, I'm not buying this one either. It boils down to "I'm an expert, so it works for me, why aren't you and your friends also experts?" No thanks.
Your choice. I'm just telling you how it can work with minimal effort. You actually need more "expertise" to change a tube than you do to use a Dynaplug. It's just that many riders are still clueless about tubeless. I came to it from mountain biking where tubeless is the norm. I do a lot of big century Sportives and there are always plenty of guys stopped at the roadside with wheels off changing tubes. I've never once had to do that with a good tubeless setup. But each to their own.

Be honest here. How many times have you really seen someone struggle to plug a hole in a tubeless tyre? Do you seriously think people would run tubeless if it was such a massive pita? For sure you can make it hard work with the wrong gear and no idea, but it's not inherently difficult.
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Old 04-18-22, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski

Be honest here. How many times have you really seen someone struggle to plug a hole in a tubeless tyre? Do you seriously think people would run tubeless if it was such a massive pita? For sure you can make it hard work with the wrong gear and no idea, but it's not inherently difficult.
I haven't kept statistics so I can't prove my position quantitatively. That's true. But it's happened multiple times.
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Old 04-19-22, 06:23 AM
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Originally Posted by MinnMan
I haven't kept statistics so I can't prove my position quantitatively. That's true. But it's happened multiple times.
Yeah well I get equally fed up waiting for people to change tubes. Some people are not very good at doing that either.
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