Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Is the Decathlon Triban RC120 an acceptable entry level road bike?

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Is the Decathlon Triban RC120 an acceptable entry level road bike?

Old 04-29-22, 03:22 PM
  #1  
Miradaman
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Greater Chicago Area
Posts: 236

Bikes: 1987 Schwinn Mirada, 1989 Trek 420, 1995 GT Timberline, 1979 Schwinn Super Le Tour, Co-Op DRT 1.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 43 Posts
Is the Decathlon Triban RC120 an acceptable entry level road bike?

Saw it on Walmart.com for $388. I know nothing about these and had always assumed they were some sort of Walmart exclusive "BSO" but discovered they're a real brand. Anybody know anything about these? Thanks in advance.
Miradaman is offline  
Old 04-29-22, 03:39 PM
  #2  
jolly_codger
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 65
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 23 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 23 Posts
BikeRadar liked it: https://www.bikeradar.com/reviews/bi...-rc120-review/
jolly_codger is offline  
Likes For jolly_codger:
Old 04-29-22, 03:47 PM
  #3  
Iride01 
more daylight today!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 12,174

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4991 Post(s)
Liked 3,500 Times in 2,427 Posts
Lack of inventory not withstanding, you can pony up $200 more and get a name brand bike from a LBS that is a manufacturer authorized reseller and then you'll have somewhere to take your bike when you have issues.

But if you are a DIY type and up for dealing with things that may or may not be correctly installed and adjusted from the get-go, then go for it.
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 04-29-22, 04:32 PM
  #4  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 23,208
Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18879 Post(s)
Liked 10,636 Times in 6,049 Posts
Decathlon isn't very well known in the US, but has a physical presence here. They're reputed for making good (quality) products at a fair price.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Likes For Seattle Forrest:
Old 04-29-22, 06:17 PM
  #5  
Miradaman
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Greater Chicago Area
Posts: 236

Bikes: 1987 Schwinn Mirada, 1989 Trek 420, 1995 GT Timberline, 1979 Schwinn Super Le Tour, Co-Op DRT 1.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
Lack of inventory not withstanding, you can pony up $200 more and get a name brand bike from a LBS that is a manufacturer authorized reseller and then you'll have somewhere to take your bike when you have issues.

But if you are a DIY type and up for dealing with things that may or may not be correctly installed and adjusted from the get-go, then go for it.
Yeah, I can do a bit on my own. And for $388 even if I pay the local bike shop to assemble and tune it still would be a deal. I'm torn between getting something like this and upgrading the drivetrain on my 80s Trek road bike...
Miradaman is offline  
Old 04-29-22, 09:56 PM
  #6  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 4,164

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 434 Post(s)
Liked 508 Times in 352 Posts
Originally Posted by Miradaman View Post
Saw it on Walmart.com for $388. I know nothing about these and had always assumed they were some sort of Walmart exclusive "BSO" but discovered they're a real brand. Anybody know anything about these? Thanks in advance.
Have some comments from friends in Germany, who bought Decathlon bikes - not sure if this model was one of them. They mostly use the bikes for 'fitness' rides, not long, about an hour so; and have nothing but good things to say. They're not what I call 'dedicated cyclists', but do ride regular 2x a week. Over there bike riding is just like going for a walk, you just do it... enjoy, then maybe have a bier after... LOL!
Looking at it, there's just no way to even buy half of the components on this bike, at the bike selling price, if one wanted to put on another frame.
Prolly an older model year. Microshift stuff works well, I have personal experience with their 10 spd, and it's reliable, bulletproof and easy to use - as good as the mid grade Shimano stuff.
It may require some 'tuning' to get things to their optimum, but the components will prolly justify that.
At $388, I would consider it a great deal - IF YOU FIT a LG or XL...best to check online geometry charts to see if the size/fit will work.
IF one wants to ride a bike and isn;t set off by lack of big names - it'll prolly get down the road nicely, and as reliably as any bike...
Ride On
Yuri
cyclezen is offline  
Likes For cyclezen:
Old 04-30-22, 09:35 AM
  #7  
Iride01 
more daylight today!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 12,174

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4991 Post(s)
Liked 3,500 Times in 2,427 Posts
Originally Posted by Miradaman View Post
Yeah, I can do a bit on my own. And for $388 even if I pay the local bike shop to assemble and tune it still would be a deal. I'm torn between getting something like this and upgrading the drivetrain on my 80s Trek road bike...
I upgraded a 1991 Schwinn Paramount frameset to all Shimano 105 5800 11 speed right after that group came out. Since I had to buy bars, stem, wheels, saddle and other things for it, I didn't save myself any money that wouldn't have put me in at least a new 10 speed Tiagra equipped bike for that day.

Upgrading that old bike did let me get some experience with DIYing the new components which was good since I was pretty much still in the days of 6 speed freewheels, single pivot rim brakes and downtube friction shifters.

What upgrading that bike didn't do for me was get me a lighter bike. So I wound up with a 22.5 pound bike which some say isn't bad. But it's not great, especially if you ride long and in rolling to hilly terrain. The new 10 speed Tiagra bike I could have gotten then will probably have been 19.5 lbs. or so. Sure, If I'd gotten better wheels and Ultegra or DuraAce components, I might have been down to that weight with my build, but then I'd have spent money that would have gotten me a even better bike for the day and probably be sub 18.5 lbs.

If your frameset weighs 6.5 lbs, you won't cheaply build your own sub 21 lbs bike. IMO!
Iride01 is offline  
Old 04-30-22, 10:02 AM
  #8  
Miradaman
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Greater Chicago Area
Posts: 236

Bikes: 1987 Schwinn Mirada, 1989 Trek 420, 1995 GT Timberline, 1979 Schwinn Super Le Tour, Co-Op DRT 1.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
I upgraded a 1991 Schwinn Paramount frameset to all Shimano 105 5800 11 speed right after that group came out. Since I had to buy bars, stem, wheels, saddle and other things for it, I didn't save myself any money that wouldn't have put me in at least a new 10 speed Tiagra equipped bike for that day.

Upgrading that old bike did let me get some experience with DIYing the new components which was good since I was pretty much still in the days of 6 speed freewheels, single pivot rim brakes and downtube friction shifters.

What upgrading that bike didn't do for me was get me a lighter bike. So I wound up with a 22.5 pound bike which some say isn't bad. But it's not great, especially if you ride long and in rolling to hilly terrain. The new 10 speed Tiagra bike I could have gotten then will probably have been 19.5 lbs. or so. Sure, If I'd gotten better wheels and Ultegra or DuraAce components, I might have been down to that weight with my build, but then I'd have spent money that would have gotten me a even better bike for the day and probably be sub 18.5 lbs.

If your frameset weighs 6.5 lbs, you won't cheaply build your own sub 21 lbs bike. IMO!
Yeah, I realize a full upgrade would be costly. I'm thinking of simply starting with a new cassette and chain and seeing how much of a difference that makes — both are original and pretty worn. I like the bike and its not that heavy, around 24 lbs. Plus Im not overly concerned with weight. If anything, I like a bike with some heft. I borrowed a friend's 17 lb. carbon road bike once and it was so twitchy light and insubstantial-feeling it spooked me. But if improving performance on my Trek ends up being a multi-hundred dollar proposition, then I'd be inclined to sell it and go with something like the Decathalon. (I also hate spending money so I overthink and over-debate any kind of recreational expenditure)
Miradaman is offline  
Old 04-30-22, 10:52 AM
  #9  
Iride01 
more daylight today!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 12,174

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 43 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4991 Post(s)
Liked 3,500 Times in 2,427 Posts
What some call twitchy I call sporty. And I like sporty.

Not all really lightweight bikes will feel twitchy or sporty. Also, if you ride long or do happen to have some hills of 5% grade there in Chicago, a 17 lb bike will make those short hills disappear. And you'll have more energy left at the end of your ride for that sprint to whatever your personal finish line is.

If you truly only ride on level terrain or only ride for 75 minutes or so, then weight is not so much of an issue
Iride01 is offline  
Old 04-30-22, 12:07 PM
  #10  
Seattle Forrest
Senior Member
 
Seattle Forrest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 23,208
Mentioned: 86 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 18879 Post(s)
Liked 10,636 Times in 6,049 Posts
Originally Posted by Miradaman View Post
Yeah, I realize a full upgrade would be costly. I'm thinking of simply starting with a new cassette and chain and seeing how much of a difference that makes — both are original and pretty worn. I like the bike and its not that heavy, around 24 lbs. Plus Im not overly concerned with weight. If anything, I like a bike with some heft. I borrowed a friend's 17 lb. carbon road bike once and it was so twitchy light and insubstantial-feeling it spooked me. But if improving performance on my Trek ends up being a multi-hundred dollar proposition, then I'd be inclined to sell it and go with something like the Decathalon. (I also hate spending money so I overthink and over-debate any kind of recreational expenditure)
Two things that are good to know:

* If you're going to replace a worn chain and cassette, you'll probably benefit from replacing the chain rings at the same time.

* That twitchy feeling doesn't come from the bike not weighing enough to be held down to the ground. It's from the bike's geometry, which means how it distributes your weight over the wheels, etc. You can get a super light bike that feels more ponderous.
Seattle Forrest is offline  
Likes For Seattle Forrest:
Old 05-01-22, 01:17 PM
  #11  
Miradaman
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Greater Chicago Area
Posts: 236

Bikes: 1987 Schwinn Mirada, 1989 Trek 420, 1995 GT Timberline, 1979 Schwinn Super Le Tour, Co-Op DRT 1.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01 View Post
What some call twitchy I call sporty. And I like sporty.

Not all really lightweight bikes will feel twitchy or sporty. Also, if you ride long or do happen to have some hills of 5% grade there in Chicago, a 17 lb bike will make those short hills disappear. And you'll have more energy left at the end of your ride for that sprint to whatever your personal finish line is.

If you truly only ride on level terrain or only ride for 75 minutes or so, then weight is not so much of an issue
Yeah, all my road biking to date has taken place in Midwestern states, so no mountains here. And I've never been interested in sprints. For the most part, I'll do a couple 20-mile rides a week for exercise, and every now and then a 50-75 mile ride with a group. As such all I need is a comfortable endurance bike that I can maintain a decent steady pace with over a distance.
Miradaman is offline  
Old 05-02-22, 08:18 AM
  #12  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 15,100

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9425 Post(s)
Liked 5,782 Times in 3,347 Posts
If your '89 420 fits well, I would much rather have a 105 modern drivetrain 420 than a basic aluminum Tiagra bike.
And I could 100% update an old 420 for less than money than a new Tiagra road bike. The wheels would be nicer than what came on the Tiagra too.

So a higher level drivetrain and nicer wheels for less.
An innicycle headset would eliminate the common cockpit conversion issue of updating older road frames too.

As for weight, a Tiagra drivetrain Trek Domane weighs 23# in a medium size. It also costs $1800. Again, 23# for this bike. I would not worry about the weight of a Trek 420 frame.
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...-disc/p/33085/
mstateglfr is offline  
Old 05-02-22, 08:50 AM
  #13  
eduskator
Senior Member
 
eduskator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Québec, Canada
Posts: 1,363

Bikes: TCR Pro, Revolt Adv

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 582 Post(s)
Liked 332 Times in 255 Posts
What's your definition of acceptable?

PS: It isn't mine.
eduskator is offline  
Likes For eduskator:
Old 05-02-22, 09:33 AM
  #14  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 4,164

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 434 Post(s)
Liked 508 Times in 352 Posts
Originally Posted by Miradaman View Post
Yeah, I realize a full upgrade would be costly. I'm thinking of simply starting with a new cassette and chain and seeing how much of a difference that makes — both are original and pretty worn. I like the bike and its not that heavy, around 24 lbs. Plus Im not overly concerned with weight. If anything, I like a bike with some heft. I borrowed a friend's 17 lb. carbon road bike once and it was so twitchy light and insubstantial-feeling it spooked me. But if improving performance on my Trek ends up being a multi-hundred dollar proposition, then I'd be inclined to sell it and go with something like the Decathalon. (I also hate spending money so I overthink and over-debate any kind of recreational expenditure)
I Didn;t really pay attention to your current bike list, but now have to ask 'What are you trying to get to'? You already have bikes, The Triban is prolly a good bike for someone who wants to get started with road cycling and doesn't currently have a bike. Or, they have a bunch of old gas pipe and not gonna get that stuff into decent operational/functional condition.
A new cassette and chain will have minimal, maybe no perceptible difference in operation, except those added to other new consumables, will have the bike riding 'younger'.
But the basics still need to be in top shape. - Good wheels and GOOD tires, good BB and crankset/rings, headset. Frame in decent shape.
Weight? the Triban and the Trek 420 are prolly a wash.
No way getting around it - maintaining a bike well will give the best performance for the machine's level.
IS New SHifter/Brifter drivetrain an important consideration? Then the Triban will have that. Adding that to the Trek 420 will be more involved - but easily done.
No way around it, keeping a bike in best running condition involves maintenance, work AND money. Not an exorbitant amount, just some.
Your current bike list looks like a list of average, 'everyday' Tribans of their day... are you looking to keep that collection building?
Not judging - it's just not clear if this is a 'collector' at work or just a bunch of bikes which are not quite in great running condition and not getting your attention, and not worth the work...
Bueller?

Ride On
Jurij
cyclezen is offline  
Old 05-02-22, 09:47 AM
  #15  
Miradaman
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Greater Chicago Area
Posts: 236

Bikes: 1987 Schwinn Mirada, 1989 Trek 420, 1995 GT Timberline, 1979 Schwinn Super Le Tour, Co-Op DRT 1.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
If your '89 420 fits well, I would much rather have a 105 modern drivetrain 420 than a basic aluminum Tiagra bike.
And I could 100% update an old 420 for less than money than a new Tiagra road bike. The wheels would be nicer than what came on the Tiagra too.

So a higher level drivetrain and nicer wheels for less.
An innicycle headset would eliminate the common cockpit conversion issue of updating older road frames too.

As for weight, a Tiagra drivetrain Trek Domane weighs 23# in a medium size. It also costs $1800. Again, 23# for this bike. I would not worry about the weight of a Trek 420 frame.
https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...-disc/p/33085/
Yeah, the 420 is a great bike as far as Im concerned. Plus I like riding vintage. I'm more inclined to upgrade it up than buy a new bike. As I stated earlier, I'm not at all concerned with weight and for my needs 24 lbs is quite light. My reason for upgrading is because the chain is stretched and the cassette is quite worn. I like the bike enough to put some money in to improve rideability.
Miradaman is offline  
Old 05-02-22, 09:55 AM
  #16  
Miradaman
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: Greater Chicago Area
Posts: 236

Bikes: 1987 Schwinn Mirada, 1989 Trek 420, 1995 GT Timberline, 1979 Schwinn Super Le Tour, Co-Op DRT 1.3

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 96 Post(s)
Liked 63 Times in 43 Posts
Originally Posted by cyclezen View Post
I Didn;t really pay attention to your current bike list, but now have to ask 'What are you trying to get to'? You already have bikes, The Triban is prolly a good bike for someone who wants to get started with road cycling and doesn't currently have a bike. Or, they have a bunch of old gas pipe and not gonna get that stuff into decent operational/functional condition.
A new cassette and chain will have minimal, maybe no perceptible difference in operation, except those added to other new consumables, will have the bike riding 'younger'.
But the basics still need to be in top shape. - Good wheels and GOOD tires, good BB and crankset/rings, headset. Frame in decent shape.
Weight? the Triban and the Trek 420 are prolly a wash.
No way getting around it - maintaining a bike well will give the best performance for the machine's level.
IS New SHifter/Brifter drivetrain an important consideration? Then the Triban will have that. Adding that to the Trek 420 will be more involved - but easily done.
No way around it, keeping a bike in best running condition involves maintenance, work AND money. Not an exorbitant amount, just some.
Your current bike list looks like a list of average, 'everyday' Tribans of their day... are you looking to keep that collection building?
Not judging - it's just not clear if this is a 'collector' at work or just a bunch of bikes which are not quite in great running condition and not getting your attention, and not worth the work...
Bueller?

Ride On
Jurij
What am I trying to get to? The chain and cassette on my 420 are original and quite worn out. I like the bike enough to replace both if it improves performance. As of now shifts tend to be rough and no amount of tuning can fix, chain slips occasionally and so on. I was under the impression that both chain and cassette are "wear items" that need eventual replacement after prolonged use. Bike has been well maintained since I bought it. But since I've never owned a "new" road bike, I was curious if a new budget road bike is money better spent than upgrading a vintage mid-grade model.
Miradaman is offline  
Old 05-02-22, 10:06 AM
  #17  
mstateglfr 
Sunshine
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 15,100

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 120 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9425 Post(s)
Liked 5,782 Times in 3,347 Posts
Originally Posted by Miradaman View Post
Yeah, the 420 is a great bike as far as Im concerned. Plus I like riding vintage. I'm more inclined to upgrade it up than buy a new bike. As I stated earlier, I'm not at all concerned with weight and for my needs 24 lbs is quite light. My reason for upgrading is because the chain is stretched and the cassette is quite worn. I like the bike enough to put some money in to improve rideability.
Look into an innicycle headset then. It is just a solid piece of tech, but it also eliminates the drawbacks of cockpit options when modernizing 80s road bikes.
And a 105 drivetrain plus decent wheels should get you below 24#
mstateglfr is offline  
Likes For mstateglfr:
Old 05-02-22, 10:24 AM
  #18  
cyclezen
OM boy
 
cyclezen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Goleta CA
Posts: 4,164

Bikes: a bunch

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 434 Post(s)
Liked 508 Times in 352 Posts
Originally Posted by Miradaman View Post
What am I trying to get to? The chain and cassette on my 420 are original and quite worn out. I like the bike enough to replace both if it improves performance. As of now shifts tend to be rough and no amount of tuning can fix, chain slips occasionally and so on. I was under the impression that both chain and cassette are "wear items" that need eventual replacement after prolonged use. Bike has been well maintained since I bought it. But since I've never owned a "new" road bike, I was curious if a new budget road bike is money better spent than upgrading a vintage mid-grade model.
Ok, so a new cassette & chain - given the bike vintage - the cassette freehub (on an original wheel?) is likely 'uniglide', which is different from the modern Hyperglide config of freehubs/cassettes.
Check Sheldon Brown website - freewheels/cassettes for that info. All depends on the current rear wheel freehub.
Given the age, and given the durability of the level of chainrings from that era - the chainring is prolly badly worn also. I don't recommend buying 'used' chainrings or cranks for that.
I'd either get a new Crankset for whatever the BB is (prolly Square taper, but needs confirming) and maybe consider an update to a full crankset/BB in a more modern External 124BB setup.
New cranksets can be had for good pricing.
Check your wheels/bearings
And highly recommend NEW cables all the way around if you haven't changed the cables in a year or 2....
Fresh tires appropriate for your riding, will make a big difference - not always the most expensive, often good can be found for affordable pricing.
Use the C & V forum for more particulars you might have questions on.
Ride On
Yuri

EDIT: Of course this all requires special tools to DIY. BUT the tools are not expensive and the processes are not complicated, just require a small amount of mechanical skill and patience. The info is easily accessible and broadly available. I always recommend DIY - not only as learning process but also makes the owner more aware of future condition and the 'feel' of proper operation. Patience and taking time, working slow enough to not screw it up.

Last edited by cyclezen; 05-02-22 at 10:36 AM.
cyclezen is offline  
Likes For cyclezen:
Old 05-02-22, 02:32 PM
  #19  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 11,138

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 48 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3410 Post(s)
Liked 2,716 Times in 1,814 Posts
For what it is, it is decent but not all that great. Certainly the nicest tourney bike out there but again that doesn't say much. I would probably upgrade the old Trek, Innicycle headset would be an excellent choice or Factory5 makes the lovely Titan stem which is a 1" quill stem for 31.8 bars and looks nice. A nice 105 gruppo would be a treat.
veganbikes is online now  
Likes For veganbikes:
Old 05-02-22, 03:16 PM
  #20  
Redbullet
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 492
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 212 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 23 Posts
I use an older version of this, with aluminum fork, on a smart trainer and a few times as a replacement of main bike for a few real rides. A durable bike, all good for the price, except for Microshift shifters, that do not have a long life. You will find soon the left shifter skipping directly from biggest to smallest ring and the right shifter skipping 2 cogs instead of 1 toward the smallest cog. I think Shimano similar shifters are much more reliable.
Redbullet is offline  
Likes For Redbullet:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.