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Tuebeless vs tubes with sealant inside

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Tuebeless vs tubes with sealant inside

Old 01-18-23, 09:26 PM
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Tuebeless vs tubes with sealant inside

I didn't want to hijack the similarly-named thread, so I am starting this one.

I've read a few recommendations (eg Rene Herse website) that suggest putting sealant inside a conventional butyl inner-tube, if the tube has a removable valve core that would make this possible. The idea is to have some of the puncture protection without the problems that some tires (eg Rene Herse) seem to have when running tubeless.

Does anyone do this? Are there any obvious down-sides? Does it actually help at all with punctures (like enough to enable someone to finish a ride home without having to change out a tube)? I don't expect miracles, but would it work less well sealing a puncture than simply running tubeless?

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Old 01-18-23, 09:46 PM
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I’ve tried sealant in clinchers a couple of times without success. Interested to hear others experiences.
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Old 01-18-23, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by gkamieneski
I’ve tried sealant in clinchers a couple of times without success. Interested to hear others experiences.
In tubed clinchers?
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Old 01-19-23, 08:47 AM
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Yes, tubed clinchers. I have used Continental Revo and CaffeLatex in rear tubed clincher tires. I think I have had 2 flats and the sealants came close to sealing but not quite. I think the secret is stopping soon enough after running over debris to make sure you remove it so that the sealant can work. Last puncture I continued to ride and the tire softened, but I thought it was going to seal. When I stopped, I found a 1/2" piece of wire, and when I removed it, the tube was toast.

So, I cannot conclude that sealant has helped me. I suppose there is the possibility that it has sealed some minor punctures without my knowing it.

I do continue to use the Effetto Mariposa CaffeLatex in my butyl sewup tires. With sewups, using sealant and carrying a folded tubular is all you've got.
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Old 01-19-23, 10:14 AM
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Putting sealant inside a tube inside a tire...
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Old 01-19-23, 10:22 AM
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I'd just go completely tubeless if I was to consider that. You'll likely get all the con's and not enough if any of the pro's.
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Old 01-19-23, 10:44 AM
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Don't the "slime" inner tubes do this already? Seems marginal at best.
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Old 01-19-23, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by msu2001la
Don't the "slime" inner tubes do this already? Seems marginal at best.
Yeah, I guess what I am asking is if something like Orange Seal in a standard inner tube would be any better than "slime," which I would avoid.
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Old 01-19-23, 02:51 PM
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One of the guys I ride with does this and swears it works. I honestly don't know how he "measures" it.

I am doubtful but I see no harm in trying it.
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Old 01-19-23, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by eduskator
Putting sealant inside a tube inside a tire...
Not all of us have tubeless-ready wheels, but we still get flats, often from mere pinpricks in the tube.
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Old 01-19-23, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark
Yeah, I guess what I am asking is if something like Orange Seal in a standard inner tube would be any better than "slime," which I would avoid.
I don't have any experience with Slime tubes, but I don't see the harm in trying some Orange Seal in a regular inner tube. The only downside I can think of is that it's difficult to get the sealant out, so when it dries up you'd have to toss the tube and start over. Also it's some extra weight that may not really be doing anything.

If you're having a lot of problems with flats, I suppose it's worth a try.
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Old 01-19-23, 04:35 PM
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sealant in tubes is pretty much standard operating practice for off road motorcycles

also common with garden and farm tractors
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Old 01-19-23, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Polaris OBark
Yeah, I guess what I am asking is if something like Orange Seal in a standard inner tube would be any better than "slime," which I would avoid.
I was told (so this is secondhand information) that if you let a tube filled with "tubeless" sealant go completely flat, parts of it will stick to each other (glued by the sealant) and the tube will tear or otherwise not inflate fully. I couldn't tell if the person was speaking from experience or conjecture, and I didn't care enough to ask.

Edit: There is a thread that seems to mention a sealant that is meant to be used with tubes. Going tubeless with a new oddball sealant.
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Old 01-19-23, 07:09 PM
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20 or so years ago a friend tried the tubes with sealant inside. He got a puncture in the rear tire and it was a hoot to see the thing ejaculating as it spun around. Bunch of it ended up on his jersey, IIRC.
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Old 01-19-23, 07:15 PM
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the biggest problem is PSI. lower psi tires say below 50 psi the sealants can work. but at 70 PSI it was more miss then hit once in awhile it would work. I Tried several of them. but the higher psi just would blow the sealant out. also you have to be able too find what's in your tire for it to seal often it was flush with the tire and I could not find it. on my 50 psi tire with flat out it has caught several punctures and now after 3000 miles I have not had to add air to the tire in am onto. usually its 1 to 2 weeks I lose 5 or so PSI
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Old 01-20-23, 10:05 PM
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Agree; I've done this with my 38-42mm gravel tires (40psi) and it worked ok, enough to get me home on a couple of occasions. On mountain bikes, 26x2.1" at 30-35psi, they work fine. Never really tried it on 23-25mm slicks. Skeptical of the higher pressure and lower volume, and also the extra few grams on the road bike.
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Old 01-21-23, 03:44 AM
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Muc Off Inner Tube Sealent

I have used it. It has sealed small punctures. It supposed to last the life of the tube, whatever that means. I ride at 70 psi on one bike 60 psi on the other.

Last edited by colnago62; 01-21-23 at 05:22 AM.
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Old 01-21-23, 08:24 AM
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Seems like you'd have to quantify how well tubeless works in high psi road tires before you can compare the success of self-sealing tubes to them. I've certainly mounted an awful lot of new tubeless tires after the original would not seal after a puncture.

And then you have the problem of quantifying punctures you don't know about because they sealed immediately.
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Old 01-23-23, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Kontact
Seems like you'd have to quantify how well tubeless works in high psi road tires before you can compare the success of self-sealing tubes to them. I've certainly mounted an awful lot of new tubeless tires after the original would not seal after a puncture.

And then you have the problem of quantifying punctures you don't know about because they sealed immediately.
Indeed, and that's the coolest part of a TL setup.
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Old 01-23-23, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by eduskator
Indeed, and that's the coolest part of a TL setup.
Or any sealant filled tube.
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Old 01-24-23, 07:36 AM
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Putting sealant in a butyl tube will work to an extent, but puncture resistance would be better if a TPU tube were used. TPU is much more elastic in the first place, but also does not tear like butyl (or latex, for that matter) so the resistance to various tire intrusions is better.

TPU is also much lighter, so feel would be improved, too.

Also, I don’t think it’s accurate to indict Herse tires generally as being problematic for tubeless. The Extralight casing is because the sidewalls are barely coated in rubber, but the Standard casing sets up tubeless fine, and I’m certain the Endurance casing does, too.

I’ve run both Extralight and Standard tubeless, so those comments are based on my experience as well as understanding tire construction.
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Old 01-24-23, 10:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Kontact
Or any sealant filled tube.
Might as well just use TL tires with sealant... What a hassle.
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Old 01-24-23, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by t2p
sealant in tubes is pretty much standard operating practice for off road motorcycles

also common with garden and farm tractors
The last 7 tractors I’ve purchased were tubeless.
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Old 01-24-23, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by eduskator
Might as well just use TL tires with sealant... What a hassle.
Given that they work with normal rims and tubes, can be filled with sealant away from the tires and are easier to change a flat on the road - what's the downside? I don't want to deal with sealant at all, but if I was doing some sort of big tour I would consider putting some in my tubes.
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Old 01-25-23, 03:31 AM
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I've used sealant in tubular tires and it works great so it would probably work in clinchers but I've not tried.
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