Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Why Americans don't dig cycling...

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Why Americans don't dig cycling...

Old 08-03-05, 06:41 AM
  #26  
Senior Member
 
Spin_Dr_Tio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Finishing my sentence in Columbia, SC
Posts: 61

Bikes: Leopard Carbon, Airborne Zeppelin, Ibex 880 (Yeah, I like the little man)

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There have been a number of great posits (e.g., density of the urban areas, the cost of this sport, social influence & receptivity). I would like to throw in one -- a bit more psychological -- reason; namely, we live in a country that has the audacity and arrogance to pathologize attention (i.e., ADD, ADHD). In the "ball sports", there exist enough down-time, diversity of activity, etc. to cater to our inability to sustain attention to detail and precision. Cycling, like long distance running (and a few other such sports), are counter-culture in this country because they do not promote the short bursts of energy the to American collective consciousness (whether it be our sports, our jobs, or our way of interacting with each other).
Spin_Dr_Tio is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 06:44 AM
  #27  
Senior Member
 
roadwarrior's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Someplace trying to figure it out
Posts: 10,664

Bikes: Cannondale EVO, CAAD9, Giant cross bike.

Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by Ben Cousins
That's the issue isn't it. In Europe, it's not a sport. It's a form of transport. A necessity.
First, we seem to call jogging a sport...

Second, like when I lived in Belgium, it's off the "necessity" that the "sport" evolves...they go hand in hand.

I did not see that many people in places like Brussels or Rome commuting via bike (more mopeds, frankly)...too much car traffic.
Now go into the country....whole different story.

Based on what I am seeing where I live, with the "rails to trails" approach and that Indianapolis will soon be totally connected with paved paths, off the streets, many more people living off these trails are starting to ride, and even commute (you can ride over 140 city blocks from the far north suburbs into the downtown area). We are selling more "fitness" bikes with racks (like Cannondale's Roadwarriors and Adventure bikes, and Giant's FCR's) to people who want to ride to work and for exercise. Our Monon Trail has really put a lot of people back on to their bikes. We are benefitting from that increased opportunity and interest.
Where I ride, mostly in a large park (fourth largest city park in the US) I can do one loop with two small sections of backtracking, of 15 and a half miles. On rolling hills next to a resevoir with little traffic and a 20mph speed limit.
And many crit and tri racers work out in there, daily.

Last edited by roadwarrior; 08-03-05 at 06:56 AM.
roadwarrior is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 06:57 AM
  #28  
Senior Member
 
DieselDan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
Posts: 8,521

Bikes: Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Bikes have always had a negitive preception in the USA. Before cars, they were villified that they frightened horses. After cars, they are in the way. I do feel that things will change as gas prices get higher. Case in point, the hospital my wife is employed at has had to add a second bike rack to accomidate the bike commuters. The parking situation is so bad there that riding a bike to work is quicker then getting to work a half hour early to find a space then walk as much as a mile to the door.
DieselDan is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 07:02 AM
  #29  
Rides a red bike
 
Jenifer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Boston, Mass
Posts: 51
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by roadwarrior
Well, I can't speak for the entire US...

But in a shop that sells about four million dollars of bikes and accessories (and a couple mill more in fitness equipment) we are coming off a month that showed a 22% increase in bike sales. I sold 12 bikes in a day and an half, myself. And many are bikes in excess of fifteen hundred dollars.
Obviously that is not an industry trend, but based on what I am seeing from manufacturers who cannot keep up with demand...and the number of 50 somethings who have bad knees and backs and want bikes for low impact exercise, and the numerous bikes I've sold to people doing triathlons, and the several requests for cyclocross bikes...and the people interested in road racing...and the parents wanting their kids OFF the Xbox and on to a weight reducing family fun activity...

I'd say, in my neck of the woods, it's a very cool sport.
Would this month's sales have anything to do with a certain Tour de France winner? :-) People are paying attention to cycling right now, and having an American winner increases good feelings and a sense of "coolness" about the sport.

Still, there seems to be a general US trend in the last few years towards non-team outdoor sports, like hiking and walking and climbing. The REIs and EMSs of the world seem to be doing quite well.
Jenifer is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 07:14 AM
  #30  
Dancing on the Pedals
 
Corsaire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 2,021
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Jenifer
Would this month's sales have anything to do with a certain Tour de France winner? :-) People are paying attention to cycling right now, and having an American winner increases good feelings and a sense of "coolness" about the sport.

Still, there seems to be a general US trend in the last few years towards non-team outdoor sports, like hiking and walking and climbing. The REIs and EMSs of the world seem to be doing quite well.
Cycling is not necessarily a team sport unless you join a club and go group riding or racing, but it can be as lonely as you want it.

Corsaire
Corsaire is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 07:25 AM
  #31  
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 41
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
it's the spandex.
Daoooo is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 07:53 AM
  #32  
.
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 437
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I remember when I was a preteen making the switch from BMX to road bikes. My friends and I left the trails, side streets and sidewalks (!) to make our way along the roads of America. (Gulp!) That didn't last too long. Talk about intimidating and down right dangerous. We moved from bikes to cars like the rest of the herd; fortunately, several years later I got back on a road bike with a little help from a nearby wooded bike path and a few less-traveled roads! Whenever I'm in Japan I can't help but be amazed at how well the mass transit system works over there and how acceptable it is to ride a bicycle amongst the city traffic. The civil engineers built the cities around the train lines instead of just building things with accessibility being an afterthought. Our American culture is too obsessed with the automobile.
jbonus is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 08:13 AM
  #33  
Rides a red bike
 
Jenifer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Boston, Mass
Posts: 51
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Corsaire
Cycling is not necessarily a team sport unless you join a club and go group riding or racing, but it can be as lonely as you want it.

Corsaire
That's what I meant. Recreational cycling -- the kind that Americans generally do -- is a non-team sport, like hiking and climbing and such. So it doesn't surprise me that it should be part of that general trend. And the bike section at my local REI has kept expanding over the years...
Jenifer is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 08:28 AM
  #34  
Embrace the weirdness.
 
primaryreality's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 153

Bikes: Motobecane

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Ben Cousins
It's just not practical to get around on a bike in the US.
I'm sorry, for anyone using that as an excuse not to go by bike, it's lame. The U.S. is huge, and you can't reasonably make such a sweeping generalization. There may be places, individual cities, where it's more of a challenge to get around by bike, but I live in a good-sized metropolis, no longer own a car, and have been getting around almost exclusively by bike quite well for a couple of years now, and I haven't found it to be either hard or impractical.

On the contrary, I consider it to be one of the best lifestyle decisions I've ever made, for a number of reasons--economic, environmental, healthwise, pleasure quotient--the list goes on and on. For the rare occasion when for some reason I don't want to go by bike or it seems too hard or inconvenient to do so, I use public transportation. Not a problem. I have yet to encounter a single situation where not having a car was even a medium-sized problem for me.

People in this country, generally speaking, are so physically lazy and automobile-focused that they don't even consider other possibilities for getting around. I know people who will get in their cars and drive one or two blocks to get a gallon of milk from the grocery store. Most people will do this.

It's normal, perfectly acceptable behavior here, and if you don't subscribe to it, you're the oddball, a little suspect.
primaryreality is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 08:31 AM
  #35  
Senior Member
 
garysol1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Traverse City Michigan
Posts: 10,244
Liked 17 Times in 11 Posts
I know around East Memphis area at least that infrastructure is a huge problem especially for the newer riders. Very tight roads with more often than not no shoulder what so ever. Add in the redneck wannabe's driving there diesel 1 tons and Dually's who cant give up a precious 20 seconds until the road is clear before they blast past you at 60 mph with 12 inches to spare. It's enough to scare anyone from riding...... or at least take a lot of enjoyment away from it.
__________________
BMC Roadmachine
Kona Jake the Snake
garysol1 is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 09:07 AM
  #36  
Senior Member
 
Drayko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Colorado
Posts: 355
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd like to add that it seems when talking to a lot of people I know about cycling, they consider it simply exercise and not really something to do for fun.

My neighbors have young kids (4 years or so old) and they all have bikes. But they have those little electric cars too and seem to ride them a lot more. I think kids are biking less these days.

Additionally, most importantly, I think the roads a more car friendly than anything else. I hate the sections of road where the bike lane suddenly dissapears along with the shoulder. Or when the shoulder is too narrow or in bad shape. Add that the enormous number of drivers driving large vehicles that they simply do not have the skills to handle. (I think an extra permit should be necessary to drive a large SUV. Too often I see people, with no bad intentions, driving badly just because they don't know the dynamics of a large vehicle.) I know that my mom is more concerned over my safety when I go road biking than anything else.
Drayko is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 09:23 AM
  #37  
That darn Yankee
 
TexasGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: West West Fort Worth
Posts: 4,284

Bikes: Mongoose XR-100, Eros Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by berny
The oil crisis will most certainly give more cred to bikes and as near as I can judge it aint too far off.
Wait till gas/petrol is $5.00/litre+ and then see how popular bikes become.
I doubt the price of gas will do ANYTHING for bikes. 1 milion cars on the road in the San Antonio region. I don't see that decreasing much. Over the 6 months that gas has gone from 1.70 i think in december till now where its 2.19 - 2.25 I have not noticed any noticeable decrease in traffic. That idea I think is a pipe dream. You want to know what the price of gas has done though? I now see 2-3 hybrid cars every single day. That is a true reality and not a pipe dream that makes no sense what so ever to anybody that has anything of a life that requires going from point a to point b carrying anything valuable at all.

Cyclists as commuters is not a realilty, should not be a reality. And if you don't believe me just start reading the people killed or injured in cycling/commuting related reports and understand that those will only increase not decrease.
TexasGuy is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 09:26 AM
  #38  
That darn Yankee
 
TexasGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: West West Fort Worth
Posts: 4,284

Bikes: Mongoose XR-100, Eros Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by primaryreality
I'm sorry, for anyone using that as an excuse not to go by bike, it's lame. The U.S. is huge, and you can't reasonably make such a sweeping generalization. There may be places, individual cities, where it's more of a challenge to get around by bike, but I live in a good-sized metropolis, no longer own a car, and have been getting around almost exclusively by bike quite well for a couple of years now, and I haven't found it to be either hard or impractical.

On the contrary, I consider it to be one of the best lifestyle decisions I've ever made, for a number of reasons--economic, environmental, healthwise, pleasure quotient--the list goes on and on. For the rare occasion when for some reason I don't want to go by bike or it seems too hard or inconvenient to do so, I use public transportation. Not a problem. I have yet to encounter a single situation where not having a car was even a medium-sized problem for me.

People in this country, generally speaking, are so physically lazy and automobile-focused that they don't even consider other possibilities for getting around. I know people who will get in their cars and drive one or two blocks to get a gallon of milk from the grocery store. Most people will do this.

It's normal, perfectly acceptable behavior here, and if you don't subscribe to it, you're the oddball, a little suspect.
Congratulations. I will have you know, that from my experience, commuting to work in any city over 20k is simply asking for death to knock on your door. I know of at least 5 cyclists who were killed in NB in the last year.
TexasGuy is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 09:29 AM
  #39  
That darn Yankee
 
TexasGuy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: West West Fort Worth
Posts: 4,284

Bikes: Mongoose XR-100, Eros Bianchi

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by DieselDan
Bikes have always had a negitive preception in the USA. Before cars, they were villified that they frightened horses. After cars, they are in the way. I do feel that things will change as gas prices get higher. Case in point, the hospital my wife is employed at has had to add a second bike rack to accomidate the bike commuters. The parking situation is so bad there that riding a bike to work is quicker then getting to work a half hour early to find a space then walk as much as a mile to the door.
Well at least if anybody gets ran over their overall end destination won't really change. Anybody that has to commute in a busy city or town, and has to either a) cross a lane or drive by an intersection where somebody may pull in or out suddenly probably has no idea just how quickly their death warrant can be signed. I hope they have decent insurance to take care of their family incase of such a occurrance.
TexasGuy is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 09:51 AM
  #40  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Multnomah, Portland, OR
Posts: 193

Bikes: Cannondale six13, On-One Dirty Disco

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
One of the main issues with cycling is the time required to get out and cycle (preparation and maintenance time of the bike as well). And I think this applies to many Americans with our long work hours and family time. Americans seem to be getting less and less recreational time with so much focus on work and making money.

Cycling requires a lot more time to participate in than say running or going to the gym for an hour after work. Weather and time of year (i.e. having to ride in the dark in the winter) can be a limiting factor for many as well. I know, you could do a one hour high impact ride, but there’s still the issue of getting all the gear on, pumping up, filling up the water bottle, pre-ride checklist, changing flats, messing with the mechanicals of the bike, etc… Running, you just throw on your shoes, put one foot in front of the other and repeat thirty thousand times.
shabbis is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 10:04 AM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Doid23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Westchester NY
Posts: 578

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, 1989 Nishiki International, Specialized Stumpjumer M2 Hardtail, ProFlex 856 Full Suspension

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Corsaire
Soccer is really a misnomer for Football (the real one, what's called football here is really "handball"), the most popular and better paid sport in the whole world, period. It may not be in the US, because of other "top" sports only in the US where some games are ludicrously called: the "world series" (what a joke!), I don't see any other foreign country in there to call it such.

Corsaire
What a bunch of jerks those Americans are.
Doid23 is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 10:05 AM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
Doid23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Westchester NY
Posts: 578

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, 1989 Nishiki International, Specialized Stumpjumer M2 Hardtail, ProFlex 856 Full Suspension

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Ben Cousins
In my opinion, that's completely the wrong way to look at cause and effect. People are people, wherever they are, and generally geographical, political or economic forces are the determining factors in cultural differences.

People in the US are automobile-focussed for a reason. It is not due to some bizarre hive-mind personality trait or media brainwashing. It's because it's the most practical choice. The roads are built for cars, cars and gas is cheap and public transport is poor because the car was in the right place at the right time.

People weren't sitting around before the car was invented saying 'gee I'm so lazy, I wish someone would invent a machine that would take me 2 miles to work', while people in Japan and Europe said 'Even if they do invent a machine that could take me the 2 miles to work, I'd deliberately ignore it because I'm so active and healthy'.

People in Europe are not naturally more active and healthy. Most of the cycle commuters in London are doing it because they simply cannot drive into work (my office of 250 people has 5 parking spaces), because public transport is poor, and because the distances involved are small (I live on the edge of the countryside in London, and it takes me 35 mins to ride into work). If it were as easy to drive into work as it is in most US cities of comparable population, believe me, we'd all be 'lazy and car obsessed'.

Most cycle commuters over here don't start riding because it's a nice lifestyle decision.
Good assessment, I agree.
Doid23 is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 10:15 AM
  #43  
ke422azn110
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
why?
1) most americans are too fat
2) cost of bike
3) spandex looks gay
4) road bike hurts your ass the first time you try it.
 
Old 08-03-05, 10:44 AM
  #44  
Senior Member
 
garysol1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Traverse City Michigan
Posts: 10,244
Liked 17 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by ke422azn110
why?

4) road bike hurts your ass the first time you try it.
Lots of truth there. In our world of instant gratification. People will try one or two rides and when they find that it hurts there ass as well as there legs and lungs they just give it up and sit back on the couch.
__________________
BMC Roadmachine
Kona Jake the Snake
garysol1 is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 10:57 AM
  #45  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 98
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Ben Cousins
I don't buy any of these ‘cultural’ reasons. I think you are doing yourself a disservice by saying you are lazy consumerists etc.

As a Brit who's visited the US on many occasions, I put forward these reasons.

Population density, age of settlements.

Your cities are much more spread out than ours, partly because of the size of the country, and partly because a lot of your roads are planned around cars due to their comparative young age. This trickles down into cars being cheaper, gas being cheaper, driving age being younger, more car parking etc etc etc.

It's just not practical to get around on a bike in the US. In London, it's just not practical to get around in a car. Other European countries with similarly small pop. density to the US (Scandinavian) still have old cities designed around horses and carts - small roads and tightly packed city centres. No strip malls and smallish suburbs fairly close to the city. Cycling is practical in these types of settlements.

It's georgraphical/historical reasons rather than sociological.

I've been reading this thread wondering if anyone would brings this up... Great point! I live in Michigan and routinely travel 50 miles round trip for work. Once I get to work I am often on the road visiting customers, etc. It would be a tad difficult for me to run a skid of parts over to Ford on the back of my bike I've never been to Europe, but common sense dictates it's much smaller and more tense in terms of population... Heck, Michigan isn't even that big of a state and I can easily drive 8 - 10 hours and not leave the State... we're just a big country.

Edited to add: I am actually moving into town (well, if I can sell my house that is) and plan on commuting to work on my bike... 20 miles round trip shouldn't be too bad and it will help keep me awake (moving b/c of sleep disorder). Needless to say, I'm pretty excited about it
Toefuzz is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 10:59 AM
  #46  
Full of pie!
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 12

Bikes: 05 Specialized Allez

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I can only speak for my experiences, but Ben Cousins makes a very good point about cycling being less prominent here because it's less practical to do so: when I lived in suburban Florida, I drove everywhere and never considered a bike because it wasn't practical to ride 5-10 miles along a 55mph high-traffic no-shoulder road to get anywhere.

When I stayed on the outskirts of Houston, it was the same way, only with denser traffic. Only when I got to Seattle did it make less sense to have a car than a bike (traffic, parking, etc) and that's why I picked it up - as a practical means of transport. If I didn't live in the dense urban area of downtown, I might still be using my car exclusively.

Of course, now that I've got the bug, I'm looking to train up for racing and/or touring, but I wouldn't have considered it until it became practical, but I imagine that's part of the reason NASCAR's so popular and TdF and GdI aren't.

It's unfortunate how many Americans live in places that are so car-centric like suburbs, but it's a reality. I think it's hard to consider cycling as transport here for non-cyclists unless you're in a rural or urban area.

On an slightly unrelated note, there seems to be an upswing in interest in bicycles among the hipster crowd, so there are subsections of America that are turning toward cycling. Granted, it's probably a fad, but the more people on two wheels instead of four, the better. And they're doing it on the cheap too: $500 track bikes and converted beaters seem de rigeur among the PBR crowd.
kateoo is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 11:36 AM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 40,865

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Canyon Exceed, Specialized Transition, Ellsworth Roots, Ridley Excalibur

Liked 3,110 Times in 1,418 Posts
Originally Posted by TexasGuy
Congratulations. I will have you know, that from my experience, commuting to work in any city over 20k is simply asking for death to knock on your door. I know of at least 5 cyclists who were killed in NB in the last year.
Really? It seems that your experience contrasts markedly with the experience of the posters in the Commuting section. Many of us commute in cities much larger than 20,000 people and many of us aren't dead yet.

We ***** about unsafe drivers and road conditions a lot but most of us are still quite alive. You should check it out.
caloso is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 11:44 AM
  #48  
bbp
hooray for spring
 
bbp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Palmdale, CA
Posts: 1,067

Bikes: 2008 Look 586

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
1. In a world where time is money, cycling isn't time efficient.
2. Cars and gas in america are cheap and Americans are rich (compared to most other countries)
3. Safety concerns. It's too easy to get seriously hurt or die on a bike when you're riding next to cars passing you at 60 mph.
bbp is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 11:56 AM
  #49  
bikewrecker
 
eroded's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 36

Bikes: Bianchi Strada

Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by TexasGuy
Cyclists as commuters is not a realilty, should not be a reality. And if you don't believe me just start reading the people killed or injured in cycling/commuting related reports and understand that those will only increase not decrease.
I'm trying to understand your point of view. I know that cycling is dangerous, but what's your suggestion as an alternative? You say to look at the number of people killed or injured while cycling as proof that commuting by bike should not be a reality. Okay, there were 725 deaths involving cyclists in 2004 according to this report. But that number doesn't mean anything by itself. Let's also look at the number of people killed while driving.

Last year, a total of 42,636 people died in traffic crashes on US highways alone. That's more than 58 times higher than the deaths involving cyclists! I'm not saying that cycling is safer than driving, just that you can get yourself killed either way. When I die, I hope I'm doing something that I love. I won't let fear keep me off my bike.
eroded is offline  
Old 08-03-05, 12:08 PM
  #50  
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 40,865

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Canyon Exceed, Specialized Transition, Ellsworth Roots, Ridley Excalibur

Liked 3,110 Times in 1,418 Posts
I think a lot of the reason is just overblown fear. The same as shark attacks and child abductions by strangers. But the numbers just don't bear out that cycling is a dangerous activity.

Here's a quote from the National Highway Traffic Safety Agency :

In 2003, 622 pedalcyclists were killed and an additional 46,000 were
injured in traffi c crashes. Pedalcyclist deaths accounted for 1 percent of
all traffic fatalities, and pedalcyclists made up 2 percent of all the people
injured in traffic crashes during the year.
(https://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/pdf/nrd...003/809768.pdf )

So, in a country of nearly 300,000,000 people, just 622 were killed on bikes. For every 100 persons killed in traffic crashes, 99 were not cyclists. Personally, I like those odds.

But rationally viewing the statistics doesn't lead the 11 o'clock news; blood on the pavement does. And that's the culture we have here in the States.

TexasGuy, I'm sorry about the loss of those 5 fellow cyclists last year. No one should die from riding his bike.
caloso is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.