Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Road Cycling
Reload this Page >

Continental Grand Prix 5000 clincher

Notices
Road Cycling “It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.” -- Ernest Hemingway

Continental Grand Prix 5000 clincher

Old 08-05-23, 09:19 AM
  #1  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Location: Florida west coast
Posts: 193

Bikes: Kestrel Legend SL, Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 57 Posts
Continental Grand Prix 5000 clincher

Thoughts on this tire?

Thinking about getting a pair of these for my road bike. I ride about 50 miles per week on flat terrain. Trying to keep the weight down.
Biker Pete is offline  
Old 08-05-23, 10:21 AM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2022
Location: Albuquerque NM USA
Posts: 550
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 243 Post(s)
Liked 336 Times in 212 Posts
Originally Posted by Biker Pete
Thoughts on this tire?

Thinking about getting a pair of these for my road bike. I ride about 50 miles per week on flat terrain. Trying to keep the weight down.
If your riding on the flat, I don't understand why weight we be much of a concern? There seems to be some different types of GP 5000's, I ride GP 5000 S TR 28 mm setup tubeless. I like them a lot., They have perhaps the lowest rolling resistance as reported by www.bicyclerollingresistance.com .

Not sure about weight compared to others, but the low rolling resistance likely is much more significant than weight, even if you were climbing. I've only be using them for about 4 months but have about 2,000 miles on them and they are wearing much better then I expected. I've worn our other tires in less than 2,000 miles, And the wear marks on these are still very clear. So, I'm sure I'm good for another 1,000 miles minimum if not another 2,000. Perhaps it makes sense. If they have low rolling resistance then they aren't absorbing energy which in part could be going into wearing them away. FYI, I'm a heavy rider at about 210 lbs.

They also seem to be pretty tough. I'm not getting too many cuts in them and none that are concerning. Even running tubeless, I not sure I've even had a puncture riding that left sealant on the bike. I pull thorns out of them after every ride, and will leak a little sealant for a moment. So, again they seem pretty good on the puncture resistance. But, this could just be dumb luck too.

They also mount easily to the rims I have. I have no other experience with other tires on these rims, so I can't say if this is due to the tires not being aggressively tight or the rims being slightly small. But I don't recall reading that these are known for being difficult to mount.

Only downside, they are pretty expensive. I'm keeping an eye out for sales as I expect I'll be using these tires for a while.
Mtracer is offline  
Likes For Mtracer:
Old 08-05-23, 11:45 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
PeteHski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 8,874
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4641 Post(s)
Liked 5,175 Times in 3,200 Posts
Originally Posted by Biker Pete
Thoughts on this tire?

Thinking about getting a pair of these for my road bike. I ride about 50 miles per week on flat terrain. Trying to keep the weight down.
They are a pretty competitive choice. My only recent experience is with tubeless 30 mm GP5000S TR and I really like them. They strike a good balance between durability, comfort, grip and speed. What tyres are you currently using?
PeteHski is online now  
Likes For PeteHski:
Old 08-05-23, 01:05 PM
  #4  
I'm good to go!
 
Iride01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Mississippi
Posts: 15,343

Bikes: Tarmac Disc Comp Di2 - 2020

Mentioned: 53 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6383 Post(s)
Liked 4,980 Times in 3,428 Posts
Why do you think they wouldn't be? Many of us have used GP5000's of the various sub models for many years. Mountains, hills or flats, they roll well, handle well and will provide a softer ride than many of the heavier cheaper tire you can get. As long as you don't live where goat heads and other thorns are common, they'll be fairly puncture resistant. Just don't run the sidewall up against anything. The sidewalls are thin. Which is one of the reasons they roll well and provide a softer ride.

I've used them on my bikes for the last 5 or more years..
Iride01 is offline  
Likes For Iride01:
Old 08-05-23, 01:16 PM
  #5  
Should Be More Popular
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 43,266

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 561 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22769 Post(s)
Liked 9,168 Times in 4,252 Posts
Fine tire. Depending on your rims may be a challenge to mount.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is online now  
Likes For datlas:
Old 08-05-23, 02:07 PM
  #6  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by Iride01
Why do you think they wouldn't be? Many of us have used GP5000's of the various sub models for many years. Mountains, hills or flats, they roll well, handle well and will provide a softer ride than many of the heavier cheaper tire you can get. As long as you don't live where goat heads and other thorns are common, they'll be fairly puncture resistant. Just don't run the sidewall up against anything. The sidewalls are thin. Which is one of the reasons they roll well and provide a softer ride.

I've used them on my bikes for the last 5 or more years..
They are indeed a rock solid value and much better tires than the Vittoria. Their contenders are the Michelin Pro Race and the Hutchinson Fusion 5 All seasons.
georges1 is offline  
Likes For georges1:
Old 08-05-23, 02:53 PM
  #7  
• —
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 12,335

Bikes: Shmikes

Mentioned: 59 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10239 Post(s)
Liked 5,962 Times in 3,213 Posts
Fantastic tires: fast, adherent, and durable. A pain to mount when new.
MoAlpha is online now  
Likes For MoAlpha:
Old 08-05-23, 03:37 PM
  #8  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Location: Florida west coast
Posts: 193

Bikes: Kestrel Legend SL, Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 57 Posts
Originally Posted by PeteHski
They are a pretty competitive choice. My only recent experience is with tubeless 30 mm GP5000S TR and I really like them. They strike a good balance between durability, comfort, grip and speed. What tyres are you currently using?
I bought a used 2016 Kestrel Legend SL that has Continental Gator Hardshell on the front and Continental Ultra Sport on the rear, both 700x23. Wheels are Zipp 202 Firecrest. I can’t say I necessarily *need* new tires but I can certainly justify it cuz putting on tires of my choosing will make the bike more ‘mine’ haha!
Biker Pete is offline  
Old 08-05-23, 04:34 PM
  #9  
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 8,719

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4821 Post(s)
Liked 1,556 Times in 1,020 Posts
Is it now the cycling vernacular that we say "clincher" to mean a tire that will have a tube, and "tubeless" to mean a tire that will not have a tube? Is that the case here?

I always understood that tubeless tires are also clinchers.
Sy Reene is offline  
Likes For Sy Reene:
Old 08-05-23, 04:45 PM
  #10  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Location: Florida west coast
Posts: 193

Bikes: Kestrel Legend SL, Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 57 Posts
Originally Posted by Sy Reene
Is it now the cycling vernacular that we say "clincher" to mean a tire that will have a tube, and "tubeless" to mean a tire that will not have a tube? Is that the case here?

I always understood that tubeless tires are also clinchers.
not sure. I’m stuck in the 70s when there were clincher and tubular tires. Anywho, my wheels require that the tire has an inner tube…..they are not ‘tubeless ready’.
Biker Pete is offline  
Old 08-05-23, 05:33 PM
  #11  
Should Be More Popular
 
datlas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Malvern, PA (20 miles West of Philly)
Posts: 43,266

Bikes: 1986 Alpine (steel road bike), 2009 Ti Habenero, 2013 Specialized Roubaix

Mentioned: 561 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22769 Post(s)
Liked 9,168 Times in 4,252 Posts
Originally Posted by Sy Reene
Is it now the cycling vernacular that we say "clincher" to mean a tire that will have a tube, and "tubeless" to mean a tire that will not have a tube? Is that the case here?

I always understood that tubeless tires are also clinchers.
I think so, “clincher” means with a tube, tubeless is clincher tubeless, and tubular/sewup is tubular.
__________________
Originally Posted by rjones28
Addiction is all about class.
datlas is online now  
Old 08-05-23, 06:30 PM
  #12  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,732

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 575 Post(s)
Liked 619 Times in 427 Posts
"Clinchers" are tires with a strong bead of rubber around the two edges which catches (clinches) on the sidewall of the rim fitting into it, a tubular tire is glued to a tubular rim so has no need for the rubber bead on the sides of the tire or the mounting sidewall for the bead to fit into.
easyupbug is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 01:20 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
tempocyclist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: Australia
Posts: 829

Bikes: 2002 Trek 5200 (US POSTAL), 2020 Canyon Aeroad SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 317 Post(s)
Liked 686 Times in 331 Posts
There are faster tyres, and there are also more durable tyres, but the GP5000 range strikes an almost perfect balance (in my opinion).



Originally Posted by Sy Reene
Is it now the cycling vernacular that we say "clincher" to mean a tire that will have a tube, and "tubeless" to mean a tire that will not have a tube? Is that the case here?

I always understood that tubeless tires are also clinchers.
Essentially, yes. These days most people do mean that, when they say either clincher (needs to run a tube) or tubeless tyre (no tube, but can if you want).

Also yes, in that a tubeless tyre is still technically a clincher tyre. 🙂
tempocyclist is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 01:24 AM
  #14  
Habitual User
 
Eric F's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2020
Location: Altadena, CA
Posts: 8,279

Bikes: 2023 Niner RLT 9 RDO, 2018 Trek Procaliber 9.9 RSL, 2018 Storck Fascenario.3 Platinum, 2003 Time VX Special Pro, 2001 Colnago VIP, 1999 Trek 9900 singlespeed, 1977 Nishiki ONP

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5119 Post(s)
Liked 8,453 Times in 3,993 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
They are indeed a rock solid value and much better tires than the Vittoria. Their contenders are the Michelin Pro Race and the Hutchinson Fusion 5 All seasons.
Which Vittoria? The new Vittoria Corsa Pro has replaced the Conti GP5000TL as my favorite tire.
__________________
"Swedish fish. They're protein shaped." - livedarklions
Eric F is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 05:07 AM
  #15  
Steel is real
 
georges1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Not far from Paris
Posts: 2,050

Bikes: 1992Giant Tourer,1992MeridaAlbon,1996Scapin,1998KonaKilaueua,1993Peugeot Prestige,1991RaleighTeamZ(to be upgraded),1998 Jamis Dragon,1992CTWallis(to be built),1998VettaTeam(to be built),1995Coppi(to be built),1993Grandis(to be built)

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 690 Post(s)
Liked 1,021 Times in 679 Posts
Originally Posted by Eric F
Which Vittoria? The new Vittoria Corsa Pro has replaced the Conti GP5000TL as my favorite tire.
Yes ,the Corsa Pro. For all my race bike projects went with the purchase of the Continental Grand Prix 4 seasons .

Last edited by georges1; 08-06-23 at 08:35 AM.
georges1 is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 06:07 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,508
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1093 Post(s)
Liked 710 Times in 452 Posts
Originally Posted by Mtracer
If your riding on the flat, I don't understand why weight we be much of a concern? There seems to be some different types of GP 5000's, I ride GP 5000 S TR 28 mm setup tubeless. I like them a lot., They have perhaps the lowest rolling resistance as reported by www.bicyclerollingresistance.com .
Because all things being equal, lighter tires handle better. More nimble, quicker acceleration, more responsive steering, etc. Rolling resistance is more of a factor over the entire ride and can reveal total watts needed to complete that ride. It says nothing about the handling characteristics of the tire.

But all things are never equal, and there are certainly tradeoffs. I'm sometimes willing to sacrifice a bit of handling in return for better puncture-resistance, for example. I find my GP5000s (tubed, 700x25c) to be a great balance of performance, handling, and reliability. I'd buy them again.
Jeff Neese is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 06:26 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
Bald Paul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Upstate SC
Posts: 1,742
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 844 Post(s)
Liked 1,701 Times in 801 Posts
I use the Continental GP5000 clinchers. I will tell you that on every group ride, whenever we hit a downhill section and are coasting, I have to pump my brakes often to keep from running up on the rider in front of me. Lowest rolling resistance of any tire I've ever used.
Bald Paul is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 06:48 AM
  #18  
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2023
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Biker Pete
Thoughts on this tire?

Thinking about getting a pair of these for my road bike. I ride about 50 miles per week on flat terrain. Trying to keep the weight down.
I gotta share my awesome experience with the Continental GP5000 clincher tire. So, I mounted it only on the front wheel of my fixie bike (didn't want crazy grip for skidding), I felt that insane grip on the road. Total control and confidence, especially when taking sharp corners. The low rolling resistance turns every ounce of energy into pure speed. GP5000 can also handles wet roads. Rain or shine, the grip stays rock-solid, and I can keep my pace without a worry. So my advise is to get yourself the GP5000, you won't regret it!
bpraditya is offline  
Likes For bpraditya:
Old 08-06-23, 06:55 AM
  #19  
Thread Killer
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 12,596

Bikes: 15 Kinesis Racelight 4S, 76 Motebecane Gran Jubilée, 17 Dedacciai Gladiatore2, 12 Breezer Venturi, 09 Dahon Mariner, 12 Mercier Nano, 95 DeKerf Team SL, 19 Tern Rally, 21 Breezer Doppler Cafe+, 19 T-Lab X3, 91 Serotta CII, 23 3T Strada

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3270 Post(s)
Liked 1,810 Times in 1,089 Posts
Originally Posted by georges1
Their contenders are the Michelin Pro Race and the Hutchinson Fusion 5 All seasons.
Michelin ended the Pro line in ‘19 when the Pro 4 Race was replaced by the Power Road, which itself was replaced in ‘22 by the Power Cup as the range-topping road race tire and thus making Power Cup the most direct competitor to Conti GP5kS.

Similarly, Hutchinson’s Fusion 5 Performance is their top of range road race rubber, making that tire a more direct competitor to GP5kS than the Fusion 5 All Season.
chaadster is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 07:57 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 636

Bikes: Lynskey R270 Disc, Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 300 Post(s)
Liked 158 Times in 133 Posts
I have GP5ks on one bike, and another has a GP4kS2 on the rear. Coming from running Vittoria Rubinos, these things just. won’t. die. Replaced the previous GP4kS2 at 3k miles due to a sidewall cut - tread was still great. The entry level OEM Ultra Sport 2 that’s been doing front tire duty for 4k miles still has its wear dimples. The bike with GP5ks only has a few hundred miles on them (this is the bike that used to run Rubinos), but the ride is definitely more supple, and noticeably less draggy feeling than the Rubinos on 1-3% grades. That said, I feel like the Rubinos stuck better on fast descents.

I also have Michelin Pro4 Endurance on a third bike, which was all I could find in 2021. It might be the frame, but those tires seem to ride just a bit more stiffly than the Contis, though no complaints about wear, traction, or rolling resistance after ~1k miles.
aliasfox is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 09:27 AM
  #21  
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2023
Location: Florida west coast
Posts: 193

Bikes: Kestrel Legend SL, Motobecane Grand Record

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Liked 139 Times in 57 Posts
Originally Posted by bpraditya
I gotta share my awesome experience with the Continental GP5000 clincher tire. So, I mounted it only on the front wheel of my fixie bike (didn't want crazy grip for skidding), I felt that insane grip on the road. Total control and confidence, especially when taking sharp corners. The low rolling resistance turns every ounce of energy into pure speed. GP5000 can also handles wet roads. Rain or shine, the grip stays rock-solid, and I can keep my pace without a worry. So my advise is to get yourself the GP5000, you won't regret it!
Have a pair arriving soon.
Biker Pete is offline  
Likes For Biker Pete:
Old 08-06-23, 09:58 AM
  #22  
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Posts: 5,991
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 989 Post(s)
Liked 537 Times in 368 Posts
Originally Posted by MoAlpha
Fantastic tires: fast, adherent, and durable. A pain to mount when new.
Yes, very nice tires. I like the wear indicators: a pair of small pits in the center of the tread. When these are worn away, the remaining tread is paper thin. (By that point, I'm starting to see the tire fabric showing through the tread, too)

Some years ago GP4000 and GP5000 were quite easy to mount. Now they are more difficult, on the same rims. I have "tubeless ready" rims, so the bead snaps into a channel with a loud POP! when the tire is inflated the first time.)
I have the most difficulty popping off the first small section of bead. Pulling across the tread with 4 fingers, or pushing with two thumbs: neither works for me. Warming the rim and tire bead with a hair dryer on a short section of rim did work for me. The rare flat (once every couple of years) seems easier too -- perhaps the flexing while riding is helpful.
rm -rf is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 10:40 AM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,732

Bikes: too many sparkly Italians, some sweet Americans and a couple interesting Japanese

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 575 Post(s)
Liked 619 Times in 427 Posts
Originally Posted by tempocyclist
...Also yes, in that a tubeless tyre is still technically a clincher tyre. 🙂
I must not have been clear in the above post, tubeless tyres are not clinchers, here and in Adelaide SA where I spent a couple years. Like Eric F I have also switched from the very good GP5000 to Vittoria's Corsa Pro, here is Vittoria's explanation of the term "clincher" with their 70 years in the bike tire business:
easyupbug is offline  
Old 08-06-23, 11:34 AM
  #24  
Advocatus Diaboli
 
Sy Reene's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Wherever I am
Posts: 8,719

Bikes: Merlin Cyrene, Nashbar steel CX

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4821 Post(s)
Liked 1,556 Times in 1,020 Posts
Originally Posted by easyupbug
I must not have been clear in the above post, tubeless tyres are not clinchers, here and in Adelaide SA where I spent a couple years. Like Eric F I have also switched from the very good GP5000 to Vittoria's Corsa Pro, here is Vittoria's explanation of the term "clincher" with their 70 years in the bike tire business:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htPFH_QLwGg
Yes, and they say that Clinchers also include tubeless tires. They are not however Tubular tires which is what the video is about.
Sy Reene is offline  
Likes For Sy Reene:
Old 08-06-23, 11:39 AM
  #25  
Senior Member
 
jadmt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Missoula MT
Posts: 1,810

Bikes: Handsome xoxo, Serotta atx, Canyon Endurace CF8

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 915 Post(s)
Liked 2,000 Times in 878 Posts
totally tubular
jadmt is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.