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Tubeless on road bikes??

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Tubeless on road bikes??

Old 02-19-24, 12:50 PM
  #176  
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer
The more efficient solution to small puncture flats is to use tires that have more flat resistance. Such as via. tread thickness and armor layers. Using irresponsibly lightweight tires and then depending on some messy slime to (temporarily) plug up holes is a suboptimal solution. Plus with the more robust normal clincher tires you don't have to deal with the mess, the special (expensive) tires with stiff (less compliant) sidewalls and the difficulty getting the beads to to seal etc.

Hey, I had tubeless on a recent gen Ultegra wheelset. Tires were impossible to install and remove without our shop-grade metal tire levers. Needed an air compressor to get any tires to seat. I tried, but it just wasn't worth the hassle.

Besides, if I need lightweight performance road gear, I'd be on tubulars. Strong, no pinch flats, and with 20cc of sealant injected, pretty much impenetrable to flats. Plus you save at least 100g per wheel, mainly in the rim.
why would i use heavier, less smooth rolling, slower tires that are still more likely to flat? 10,000+ tubeless miles in the last few years and i think maybe one ride-ending flat. had a half dozen in a thousand miles of riding with tubes, with less ride comfort. it's a no-brainer when done correctly. all the nonsense cyclists go through to get good at fixing flats on the side of the road with their toolkits is a skillful adaption to a situation which need not exist any longer.
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Old 02-19-24, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by choddo
OK so now your criticism seems more reasonable. I also had a set of tubeless at the start that were near impossible to fit and it almost put me off for life. They were GP5000TLs. Since then I have used 3 types of high quality tubeless on 3 different wheelsets (IRCs and GP5000TR) and they are pretty easy to fit and I did two tyre swaps including new sealant in less than 10 minutes last week. I've never used a compressor in my life.
The GP5000S TR is possibly the easiest tyre I've fitted, including tubed tyres. Some tyre/rim combinations are harder than others, but that applies to tubed tyres as well. Anyway it's a not a problem for me.
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Old 02-19-24, 12:56 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I don't have ANY of those issues with GP5000S TR tyres. Sorry, but you are just arguing complete nonsense as usual. If tubeless tyres were evenly remotely as bad as you state then nobody would be using them, including me.
yeah, same. no metal tire levers, no special skills or hand strength. ±1850g weight for front and rear (disk brake) wheels including the tires, sealant, valves, rim tape.
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Old 02-19-24, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Dave Mayer
The more efficient solution to small puncture flats is to use tires that have more flat resistance. Such as via. tread thickness and armor layers. Using irresponsibly lightweight tires and then depending on some messy slime to (temporarily) plug up holes is a suboptimal solution. Plus with the more robust normal clincher tires you don't have to deal with the mess, the special (expensive) tires with stiff (less compliant) sidewalls and the difficulty getting the beads to to seal etc.
Wait a minute.I thought that I need to ride the lightest bike possible -- otherwise I'll have to suffer the terror and shame of being dropped by the group on a big climb because the extra hundred grams are holding me back?

Man, you're confusing me.
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Old 02-19-24, 02:16 PM
  #180  
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Originally Posted by Koyote
Wait a minute.I thought that I need to ride the lightest bike possible -- otherwise I'll have to suffer the terror and shame of being dropped by the group on a big climb because the extra hundred grams are holding me back?

Man, you're confusing me.
The loudest proponent of "rotating mass is critically important" is advocating for heavier tires. I'd say it's ironic, but that would be too generous.
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Old 02-20-24, 03:10 AM
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Yeah so my experience with modern tubeless has been that it just works. I have tubeless on two bikes (fatbike and road bike) and if I don't actually pull them off the rim they can be inflated with a hand pump after a adding sealant (or water in my case, since the sealant I use is water soluble and can be refreshed with water).

After I swap tires I use a track pump and soapy water to lift the tires on the rim. Usually takes a pump or two to get air tightness. The soapy water isn't always necessary, but it helps so much and takes so little effort that I just use it regardless.

Compressors were needed when tubeless standards were still all over the place and people (including myself) used tape to build up traditional rims shapes which would actually support a tubeless tire. But those days are long gone. The issue one might have these days is a tire / rim combo that's so tight that a tire is difficult to take off the rim. But that's really rare.
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Old 02-21-24, 12:44 AM
  #182  
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After too many years of roadside, or trail-side, flat repair, I went tubeless. Zero flats in 3 years on the mtb - where I would have at least 5 a season. On the road bike only 1 sidewall cut which required a tube and boot and a roofing nail (which I was able to ride home on/with in the tire - which lost 5 lbs pressure which I plugged and rode 2000 miles with) in 4 years and 20,000+ miles. On my old tubed road bikes, I would fix at least 6-8 flats per year. The results speak for themselves, but to each their own.
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Old 02-21-24, 08:40 PM
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The issue I need advice is regarding my wife’s Specialized Como e-bike. The bike is a portly 50 lbs, which is too heavy for her to change a tire. Besides, it requires special tools to remove the rear wheel. Removing the tires requires someone with Herculean strength or a vice to place the tire into. Since It appears Slime is a ‘no bueno” , so is there any well regarded sealant that can be used on a tubed bike?

She had a flat this last summer and had to call me to bring the car to rescue her and the bike. (She does have CO2 and an inflator which works for a slow leak, but that was not the case)
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Old 02-22-24, 02:26 AM
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Can her wheels not take proper tubeless tyres? They tend to only need removing in 99% of cases back home/in a workshop.

but Orange Seal reckon their stuff works in tubes.
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Old 02-22-24, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
The issue I need advice is regarding my wife’s Specialized Como e-bike. The bike is a portly 50 lbs, which is too heavy for her to change a tire. Besides, it requires special tools to remove the rear wheel. Removing the tires requires someone with Herculean strength or a vice to place the tire into. Since It appears Slime is a ‘no bueno” , so is there any well regarded sealant that can be used on a tubed bike?

She had a flat this last summer and had to call me to bring the car to rescue her and the bike. (She does have CO2 and an inflator which works for a slow leak, but that was not the case)
liner & a tube filled with stans, while using the best puncture resistant tire.
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Old 02-22-24, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by choddo
Can her wheels not take proper tubeless tyres? They tend to only need removing in 99% of cases back home/in a workshop.

but Orange Seal reckon their stuff works in tubes.
Will have to see if they have tubeless in that size. They look like truck tires - but when they are supporting a 50lb bike plus rider, they have to be industrial.
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Old 02-23-24, 06:51 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
Will have to see if they have tubeless in that size. They look like truck tires - but when they are supporting a 50lb bike plus rider, they have to be industrial.
Well to be fair, actual truck tyres are tubeless
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Old 02-23-24, 08:17 AM
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Originally Posted by rsbob
Will have to see if they have tubeless in that size. They look like truck tires - but when they are supporting a 50lb bike plus rider, they have to be industrial.
I have seen plenty of fat bike tubeless kits around, so I’m sure it can be done. It would make sense if you can.
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Old 03-21-24, 05:39 PM
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Hey !
I tried my wheels to run tubeless and in fact it worked (Roval CLX32 rim brake - 2018-19 I think, I can't find manual for them, but I think they are not tubeless).
But, what was most annoying, that tubeless tape doesn't stick to carbon surface ! (I clean it few times with IPA).
and also when I remove tires, they are slighly glued to the tape, so when I remove the tire, the tape gets removed too :/
(tape is correct width - touching the sides)
How do you deal with that problem ?

Last edited by razorjack; 03-24-24 at 05:34 PM.
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Old 03-22-24, 03:25 AM
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Originally Posted by razorjack
Hey !
I tried my wheels to run tubeless and in fact it worked (Roval CLX32 rim brake - 2018-19 I think, I can't find manual for them, but I think they are not tubeless).
But, what was most annoying, that tubeless tape doesn't stick to carbon surface ! (I clean it few times with IPA).
and also when I remove tires, they are slighly glued to the tape, so when I remove the tire, the tape gets removed too :/
How do you deal with that problem ?
My Bontrager Aelous wheels had a plastic rim strip that was designed to “convert” them to tubeless ready. I don’t know if that would fit even vaguely well enough on other rims. It was a complete circle and you put it on like a tyre and it snapped into the rim bed very tightly.
Like this
https://youtu.be/9Zr8rgP7MO4?si=4qYas3GrEHOE0xCI

Last edited by choddo; 03-22-24 at 03:36 AM.
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Old 03-22-24, 06:09 AM
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Not all rim tapes are alike and they must be the correct width to completely cover the ledge on both sides. Scotch 8898 is often recommended, but widths are limited. My BTLOS wheels have no spoke access holes and require no rim tape. I sold Zipp 303s wheels to get rid of rim tape.

Any rim tape without adhesive would obviously not work for tubeless.
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