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2010 Scott CR1 Pro vs 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo

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2010 Scott CR1 Pro vs 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo

Old 09-15-23, 12:37 PM
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2010 Scott CR1 Pro vs 2015 Cannondale Supersix Evo

I've seen some folks with C'Dale and some with Scott CR1s here, and some have signatures with Scott bikes. Who can tell me the big differences between these bikes, and if the Cannondale is a significant upgrade or not. Ultegra 6700 vs 6800 to start, Mavic Ksyrium vs Aksium (a downgrade). I think both are, more or less, currently, stock.
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Old 09-15-23, 02:52 PM
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The supersix is a more aggressive position. It has a 26 mm lower stack height when comparing both bikes in a 56cm size. So you need to know whether you like a very aero position. If you don't, it's not as simple as just raising the bars to fix that. However new bikes usually come with 30mm or so of spacers under the stem. If you are looking at used, and the previous owner removed the spacers and trimmed the steerer tube, then it could be expensive to get that back.

Supersix is a great bike if you like that low position. If you don't then go for the Scott. Scott's are really good bikes. If you want higher than that for the stack and bar height, then the Specialized Roubaix beats most all the other road bikes.

A Scott Addict will be a more aggressive fit than the Scott CR1, but still not quite as much as the Supersix.

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Old 09-15-23, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Iride01
The supersix is a more aggressive position. It has a 26 mm lower stack height when comparing both bikes in a 56cm size. So you need to know whether you like a very aero position. If you don't, it's not as simple as just raising the bars to fix that. However new bikes usually come with 30mm or so of spacers under the stem. If you are looking at used, and the previous owner removed the spacers and trimmed the steerer tube, then it could be expensive to get that back.

Supersix is a great bike if you like that low position. If you don't then go for the Scott. Scott's are really good bikes. If you want higher than that for the stack and bar height, then the Specialized Roubaix beats most all the other road bikes.

A Scott Addict will be a more aggressive fit than the Scott CR1, but still not quite as much as the Supersix.
Yeah, I went and road it, and not sure how it was set up, but it didn’t really feel more aggressive than CR1. It shifted better, seemed tighter, felt very similar, but that’s just on a short ride. Maybe I should go back out and take a closer look. FWIW, I never really ride in the drops, hands are usually behind horns of shifters. The main thing I wanted to know was whether the bike is any better, significantly, than a very good and new-for-2010 CR1 Pro. Wanted to know if it's worth spending several hundred dollars on instead of upgrading components on the current Scott. Or, is the Scott just fine and already really close to the Evo and I should consider adding some lighter components like carbon wheels to start and that'll make it significantly better than a stock Evo? Everything I’ve read about the CR1 Pro seems to be high marks in spite of older components and a slightly heavier frame (vs the Evo). Sounds like overall both bikes are very good and smooth out road noise for racier bikes. Yes, 56 cm frame on both. Currently own the Scott.

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Old 09-16-23, 09:35 AM
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Scott and Cannondale make good to great bikes. The differences will come with the components that particular bike has on it. And for used bikes you don't know anything about, you need to be able to know if those components are working and still have life left in them. If you have to start changing out components, then you may have bought a money pit and will have been better off buying a brand new bike.

You say you felt comfortable on the Supersix. Was that just around a parking lot? Or did you ride the condiitions you normally ride. 10 miles will tell you things about a bike and it's fit that the parking lot won't. 30 miles even more.

If you like the position that the Scott currently gives you, then it's going to be a better bike for you than something that gives you a position you don't like. And if you aren't one to like going to the drops on the Supersix for times you wish to generate some speed, then that bike won't do anything better for you.

You mention upgrading components on the Scott. If you can DIY all the stuff you wish to change out, then you'll have one gear more with Shimano 6800. And the 5800/6800 groups were said to have better shifting performance. But only slightly. But that isn't going to make your ride more enjoyable or faster once you get over the novelty of one more gear.

You say the shifting on the Supersix did seem better. People here will argue that the difference isn't really that much. So you might just need to get your stuff adjusted properly or maybe change cables and chain. Maybe cogs too if they are worn. And if your bike isn't shifting well, that tends to say you don't like doing DIY enough or have gotten skilled at it yet.

Between the two, I'd keep the Scott if you aren't interested in getting a lower position. If you have old style drops on it that give a lot of drop, you might take a look at bars with a short reach and shallow drop. That way you might stay more on the hoods instead of the top of the bar and be able to keep a slightly more aero position. Then not having to go as far down for the drops, you might use them more when you are fast. Being more aero will save you watts so you can go faster and/or farther.

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Old 09-16-23, 01:22 PM
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Any weight savings in the frame are likely eaten up by the Aksium wheels (relative to the Ksyrium).

If I already owned the Scott, Iíd have someone give it a good once over - replace cables and housing, fresh brake pads and tires if needed, lubing all the pivots/joints, clean the chain and the rims. Unless the Scott was ridden very hard and put away wet, there ought not to be a big difference in shifting performance between Ultegra 6700 and 6800.

From that point, Iíd decide what other tweaks it needed - your other thread mentions a new crank, and I personally prefer a compact bar, such as an FSA Omega, along with whatever stem works for you. Maybe a saddle that agrees with you, too.

I have a 2004 Bianchi that trades PRs with my 2019 Lynskey, so from my experience, as long as youíre comfortable, have the right gearing for your strength and terrain, and it doesnít break on you, your Scott will be every bit as good as something newer.
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Old 09-16-23, 02:51 PM
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Awesome - great answers guys! I've already put about $130 of service into the Scott with brake pads, one new (rear brake or derailleur?) cable by the local lbs, long with a safety check and derailleur adjustment. The rear shifting works pretty well, but the front has some hesitation. I've not looked into it myself yet. I can also take it back to Conte's Bike Shop and let them tweak it too (which I should probably do). I don't think there's any major issues with the Scott and have put around 250 miles on it so far. I'm very mechanical, just haven't worked on bikes much yet, so will look into how to remove press fit BB, but just might remove crank and let Contes do that for now. I have car tools like pullers, torque wrenches, plenty of wrenches and so forth, but not much bike stuff yet, but am definitely wanting to learn.

The Cannondale is owned by original owner and looks like it's in pretty good shape. Took it for probably a two mile ride on the road. One nick on top tube. I know the Aksium's are a bit of a liability, but I'm really thinking about some lighter (carbon?) wheels for either bike, and looking into 25 mm tires maybe for a little smoother ride. Tires on the Scott are near end of life but the Continental 5000s on the Evo are probably 90%. Dude selling it has like three other bikes and doesn't ride this one anymore. It sounds like I'm perfectly good with the Scott since it checked out. Sounds like some good carbon wheels turn the Evo or the CR1 into a bike on a different level. I've also read about carbon bars making a big difference in reducing road buzz. Will look into compact bar, but another thing I'm leaning heavily toward is a fitting, after recommendations here and talking to a guy in our group rides, and he highly recommended it too. The fitter can guide me on some of that stuff.

Thanks for all the info guys - very helpful! Any additional info is certainly welcome - I'm definitely still learning.
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Old 09-16-23, 06:59 PM
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Here's the bike and the clearance between the forks/triangle. I was able to fit a 4 mm hex wrench between the current tires (Vittoria Rubino Pros) and the forks/rear triangle. In the front on the right side, there was maybe 3 mm of clearance for some reason, but seems the rim was maybe bent? It doesn't seem badly out of true but might be some.
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Old 09-16-23, 07:08 PM
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Old 09-16-23, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by sfortner



Iím pretty confident you can fit one size up on the front, looks a bit close in back (also, donít know the chainstay clearance from these pictures).

Also, if thatís the handlebar position where youíre most comfortable (tilted up, on a slightly upward pointing stem), I wouldnít go for a more aggressive frame. From the looks of it, you might be more comfortable going in the other direction, like a Synapse or a Roubaix, rather than a SuperSix.
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Old 09-16-23, 08:42 PM
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Great point. Just checked clearance and thereís probably 4+ mm on the right/drive side and feeler gauge clearance of 3 mm on the next. In other words, maybe 2 mm without it rubbing on the left chainstay. A disadvantage with older bikes. BTW I do ride with the tires at 100 psi.

yeah I noticed the bars are high but havenít researched any on adjusting. I have had some lower back issues in the past but my lower back doesnít bother me riding with my hands forward.


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Old 09-17-23, 09:52 AM
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I can confirm that the tire-to-chainstay clearance on Scott CR1 Pro is quite small.

When I was operating tours, the bikes we supplied for guests were CR1 Pros with stock 23mm tires. On one of the tours, a rear wheel went out of true (not sure why, possibly a crash). The guest kept riding without noticing the wheel was rubbing the chain stay. It wore a hole in the chain stay, making the bike unusable.

The CR1 Pro was a great bike for long days in the saddle. What would be called an "endurance bike" these days.
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Old 09-26-23, 09:15 PM
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My experience is that bikes with designs dating back more than 10 years frequently have issues with larger modern tires. The conspiracy theorist in me says that the industry promoted wider tires in order to make older bikes obsolete, but that is just a theory. Also, plenty of other things out there to push out older bikes like hidden cables / hoses, hydraulic discs, electronic shifting, thru axles, etc.
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Old 09-27-23, 08:53 AM
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Haha, yeah Iím a conspiracy analyst too but they say thereís some science with the wider tires and rolling resistance is a moot point considering the additional shock absorption. I guess Iím trusting the ďscienceĒ here without verifying it myself! They also say better aero on newer bikes.
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Old 09-27-23, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Silver02M5
My experience is that bikes with designs dating back more than 10 years frequently have issues with larger modern tires.
And if you happen to be riding a 10+ year old bike, your local shop may not have a tire to fit.

I had that experience yesterday, when my rear tire popped (yes, I waited a bit too long to replace it). I limped about 1 mile to the nearest shop, where I searched without success for a 25mm tire. After a few minutes, the mechanic asked if I needed help.

Me: "I need a 700 by 25 tire".

Mech: "Not a very popular size. Look around the corner on the wall, there might be one there."

There was indeed one there. Just the one.

There is a price to pay for having a bike that doesn't conform to the latest fad.
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