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Retired and want to get back into cycling in my 60s.

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Road Cycling ďIt is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle.Ē -- Ernest Hemingway

Retired and want to get back into cycling in my 60s.

Old 09-18-23, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by DaveSSS
Don't buy any bike with rim brakes. I made that mistake when I came back in 2018 after nearly 8 years off. I switched to disc brake frames with electronic shifting 3 years ago. More recently, I sold off my aluminum rimmed wheels for tubeless tires to get hookless carbon rims that have 23-25mm internal width. My tires all need 60 psi or less. With 28-30mm tubeless tires the ride is greatly improved. You'll have to spend significantly, more than $2500.
Yeah, I'm sure $2500 would be a stretch, but my budget was $3,000 in the used market and I'm finding a lot of top-quality rides in that range. Don't know that I need electronic shifters, though I'm sure it's very nice to have, but the disc breaks are something I'm certainly looking for now.
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Old 09-18-23, 02:01 PM
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I routinely see excellent bikes with modern frames and components selling for less than $2,000. The trick is finding one with a frame size that is a good fit. No big deal to change tires or cassette or derailleurs but a bad fit with the frame is another thing entirely. There are also quite different sizes between the "medium" size frame from one bike company to another. If one is on the edge of a size they may be having to go up or down a good deal to get the best fit with a frame.
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Old 09-18-23, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Calsun
I routinely see excellent bikes with modern frames and components selling for less than $2,000. The trick is finding one with a frame size that is a good fit. No big deal to change tires or cassette or derailleurs but a bad fit with the frame is another thing entirely. There are also quite different sizes between the "medium" size frame from one bike company to another. If one is on the edge of a size they may be having to go up or down a good deal to get the best fit with a frame.
Differences in dimensions for the same frame size are what I'm noticing. A 56cm in Specialized is what I rode and it was fine but a 56cm in many Italian bikes I'm finding is a bit larger.
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Old 09-18-23, 04:52 PM
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If it's a real Colnago, that's a great getting back into it bike. The only issue I have as a Campy guy, I'd be pouring over eBay looking for some components.
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Old 09-18-23, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by MulliganAl
I'll look into the forum for 50+ riders as well but I still have a need for speed and sporty bikes so I thought I'd start here with the cool folks.
Hmm, so we older riders aren't cool?
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Old 09-18-23, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by mackgoo
If it's a real Colnago, that's a great getting back into it bike. The only issue I have as a Campy guy, I'd be pouring over eBay looking for some components.
What do you mean by "real Colnago", are there fake Colnago's out there? Is this something I need to be looking for? It sure looked real close up but I guess you never know.
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Old 09-18-23, 06:31 PM
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Just something worth checking. Find out where to expect serial numbers and see if it has as expected. For me rim brakes would never be a deal breaker.
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Old 09-21-23, 02:53 PM
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I'm 58, and love my rim brakes and mechanical shifting! Easy to service, easy to replace. Easy to understand.

If you NEED the huge stopping power of discs, and find shifting manually a chore, then get the latest disc and electric stuff by all means. I just find buying used top of the line rim brake frames and new components a way better value.
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Old 09-21-23, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by AndyK
I'm 58, and love my rim brakes and mechanical shifting! Easy to service, easy to replace. Easy to understand.

If you NEED the huge stopping power of discs, and find shifting manually a chore, then get the latest disc and electric stuff by all means. I just find buying used top of the line rim brake frames and new components a way better value.
The problem with rim brake frames is not the brake mechanism per se, but that the frame was designed with less wheel and tire clearance. I recently lost $100 on shipping to return a Time Fluidity frame, which was perfect except it would not even fit tires that measure at 27 mm wide (nominally 25 mm tires mounted on wheels with an internal width of 19 mm). I was told by Time that the frame would fit 28 mm tires, but there was so little clearance that I was sure that even 25 mm tires would rub.
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Old 09-21-23, 05:20 PM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
The problem with rim brake frames is not the brake mechanism per se, but that the frame was designed with less wheel and tire clearance. I recently lost $100 on shipping to return a Time Fluidity frame, which was perfect except it would not even fit tires that measure at 27 mm wide (nominally 25 mm tires mounted on wheels with an internal width of 19 mm). I was told by Time that the frame would fit 28 mm tires, but there was so little clearance that I was sure that even 25 mm tires would rub.
I hear ya. Must have been an older one. I had a 2015 Fluidity that fit 25mm tires no problem.

I now have a Time NXR Instinct. Itís a 2011, and only takes 23mm tires. That said, itís more comfy than my De Rosa Protos that takes 28mm tires.
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Old 09-21-23, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by AndyK
I hear ya. Must have been an older one. I had a 2015 Fluidity that fit 25mm tires no problem.

I now have a Time NXR Instinct. Itís a 2011, and only takes 23mm tires. That said, itís more comfy than my De Rosa Protos that takes 28mm tires.
It was this one: TIME FLUIDITY S TL RIM BRAKE FRAMESET - MD Ė TIME - SHOP (timebicycles.com)

It might have fit another nominally 25 mm tire on a wheelset with an internal width of 17 mm. For example, I know that GP 5000 are narrower than Grand Sport Race or Vittoria Corsa clinchers. But I did not feel like going backward to a narrower wheel.
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Old 09-21-23, 10:18 PM
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Originally Posted by MulliganAl
I sold my CF Specialized Tarmac many years ago and want another nice road bike but something a bit more comfortable since I'm now in my 60s. My budget is around $2,000-$3,000 but since I've been away from the sport for a while I'm not as up on what's considered to be a good bike these days in this price range so I'm hoping you folks can help me out a bit. I did look at a used 2021 Colnago V3 which was a nice bike, wish it had an Ultrega grouping but it has 105 which I guess is fine. I'll look into the forum for 50+ riders as well but I still have a need for speed and sporty bikes so I thought I'd start here with the cool folks.

Any thoughts on this 2021 Colnago V3 for $2200? He wasn't sure who made the CF wheelset and it didn't have disc like other V3 Colnago's built around this time but other than that the bike was clean.

And if there are other bikes that you'd recommend in the price range it would really be appreciated.


.
Re the 2021 Colnago V3 - counterfeit or real - have you checked out the reviews and images online for the bike? Stock cosmetics are really hard to counterfeit... unless there's an entire production volume of the counterfeits.
Too Fast/Too Low for you? You have seen the actual bike? did you actually get to sit on it or ride it, adjust it (seat) and is the posture/position OK? If not, you'll not know if it'll be comfortable.
I'm 74 and own Tarmacs (mulitple) and roubaixs (multiple) - I prefer the tarmac position to any 'endurance' type position, Tarmac is the most comfortbale bike I own.

2021 Colnago V3 looks to be a similar beast to a tarmac. $5K new for $2K & change = good deal - if you check what's working and what needs attention or replacement (tires, chain, bar tape, brake blocks and even cassettes are 'comsumables'...)
Shimano 105 from that era is THE PRICE/VALUE goldmine for function, rideability and decent looks. Can't be beat (some Campy gruppos are equivalent, SRAM functions as well).
Rim Brake - still OK. But if I was buying a 'NEW Bike' I would buy disk... just makes sense.
But... there are still plenty of great NEW wheelsets available for rim, if you think you want a 2nd wheelset (I didn;t stop at 2nd... LOL!)
The variety of riders in 50+ is prolly the same as there is here in 'Road'... And there are plenty of durable 50+ that know 'fast'...
Shopping and kicking tires is the fun part - ordering something online, not that much fun.
I would get to the tire kickin, and figure things out. at 60ish+, let's hope that this isn;t your last bike...
I'm fairly certain I haven't purchased my last bike yet...
Ride On
Yuri

EDIT: oh yeah, I didn't address tire width, cause for a 2021, I would expect it to fit at least a 28mm tire... no need to go wider (for me)
25 is still my goto, and 23 is acceptable/fine.

Last edited by cyclezen; 09-22-23 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 09-22-23, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Bald Paul
Hmm, so we older riders aren't cool?
When hot chicks call you Sir, cool no more...
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Old 09-22-23, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by wheelreason
When hot chicks call you Sir, cool no more...
Guess I'm still cool, then.
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Old 09-25-23, 05:14 PM
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It's been my experience that it is way more fun being able to afford anything that I want.

And I'm so old that women open and hold the door for me.
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Old 09-25-23, 07:45 PM
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Didn't read the whole thread so maybe somebody already said this:

CF rims and rim brakes? Don't do it. Especially if you expect to be able to stop in the rain.
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Old 09-26-23, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by MulliganAl
Differences in dimensions for the same frame size are what I'm noticing. A 56cm in Specialized is what I rode and it was fine but a 56cm in many Italian bikes I'm finding is a bit larger.
These days, frame size number have become meaningless. Look for stack and reach values.
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Old 09-26-23, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by DaveSSS
These days, frame size number have become meaningless. Look for stack and reach values.
Addendum: reach and stack alone are insufficient to gauge fit. At a minimum, effective top tube must also be considered. The other frame geometry numbers seem to have more to do with handling?
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Old 09-26-23, 02:22 PM
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Fun Bike.
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Old 09-26-23, 03:47 PM
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Go to a local bike shop or Trek dealer in Atlanta. Check out the Domanes. I bought my first carbon with disc at 61 - 2 years ago Domane SL5. Great geometry for me for long rides. 105 groupset. 32 mm tires. Super comfy. And I get as speedy as I dare to at a more fragile age.

I recommend new vs used and from a local shop for service and support. For fun I have couple of backup bikes - one a used CAAD 7 for bit lighter weight and racier geometry. 25 mm tires and rims brakes. No reason you could not stretch your budget for good new and a pre-owned one Good luck and go ride!
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Old 09-28-23, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
Addendum: reach and stack alone are insufficient to gauge fit. At a minimum, effective top tube must also be considered. The other frame geometry numbers seem to have more to do with handling?
Totally wrong. Effective top tube adds nothing that isn't covered by reach. Top tube is affected by the seat tube angle. Reach is not.

The only other dimension to consider for fit is rhe seat tube angle. I know what range I need and how much seatpost setback I need to go with each STA. Frames in my size nearly always have a 74-75 degree STA. I've never had a 75, but if I did, it would need a 32mm setback post. For 74-74.5 degree I want a 25mm setback, but some frames only offer a 20mm setback on a proprietary post that can't be changed.
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Old 09-28-23, 03:50 PM
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Originally Posted by DaveSSS
Totally wrong. Effective top tube adds nothing that isn't covered by reach. Top tube is affected by the seat tube angle. Reach is not.

The only other dimension to consider for fit is rhe seat tube angle. I know what range I need and how much seatpost setback I need to go with each STA. Frames in my size nearly always have a 74-75 degree STA. I've never had a 75, but if I did, it would need a 32mm setback post. For 74-74.5 degree I want a 25mm setback, but some frames only offer a 20mm setback on a proprietary post that can't be changed.
Why the vehement disagreement!?

Yes, the effective top tube is affected by the seat tube angle (and vice versa). Therefore, if one knows reach and stack, and also the effective top tube, one can determine the seat tube angle. Similarly, if one knows reach and stack, and also the seat tube angle, one can determine the effective top tube. In other words, the difference (in length) between reach and effective top tube for a given stack is determined by the seat tube angle. It is just trigonometry. Your two quoted statements that I have bolded above contradict each other.

I would even venture that the effective top tube is easier for most people to visualize and evaluate whether they would be too stretched out or cramped.
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Old 09-29-23, 06:46 AM
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My wife (age...70) has a Canyon Ultimate and I (age 77) have a Canyon Aeroad. She also has a Colnago and I have a CAAD 12, Guru Photon, and Guru Sidero. If I didn't have a bike I'd go straight to Canyon. Either an Aeroad or Ultimate.
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Old 09-29-23, 06:49 AM
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I would suggest buying the cheapest bike you can find that fits you. If you keep riding and getting better and stronger, the bike you want in a couple of years is not the bike you want today. I am 65 and went through something similar. When I started riding again I really wanted a new bike. When I look back now I am very happy I didn't purchase that bike.
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Old 09-29-23, 06:52 AM
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As a mechanical engineer I certainly know my trigonometry, but everyone wanting a new frame shouldn't have to use it. Once you know your preferred stack and reach range, plus your desired STA, it only takes seconds to figure out whether a frame meets your needs. It's a huge improvement to have this info. I also know that the proper stack can be affected by the stem angle. Two of my frames have -7 degree integrated bar/stems with internal routing of brake lines. Other bars and stems would make for an ugly setup. I chose a 505mm stack and use the minimum 20mm headset top cover setup. If a -17 stem is an option, I would prefer a 20mm taller total stack, with the headset top cover.

OK, three dimensions should be considered. Still no trigonometry needed. Many of today's frame have proprietary seat posts with inadequate setback for me. If the fame has a 75 degree STA and anything less than 25mm of setback on the post, it's an immediate NO.
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