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Fat man wanted to try out roadbike

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Fat man wanted to try out roadbike

Old 11-01-23, 12:16 AM
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Fat man wanted to try out roadbike

Hi, I'm 135kg and I wanted to get a road bike but all the road bike max weight is 120kg . But I saw some other riders on road also look same size as me or even bigger but they are riding those market road bike .so anyone can provide me some advise
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Old 11-01-23, 03:10 AM
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Originally Posted by lato4ka
Hi, I'm 135kg and I wanted to get a road bike but all the road bike max weight is 120kg . But I saw some other riders on road also look same size as me or even bigger but they are riding those market road bike .so anyone can provide me some advise
They can probably take more weight but haven’t safety tested and can’t risk the liability. There was a guy who was much bigger than you who started on a strong steel hybrid and put in enough miles to drop to a weight that was within the road bike max.
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Old 11-01-23, 03:11 AM
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Found him. This guy
https://theamazing39stonecyclist.wor...vy-for-a-bike/
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Old 11-01-23, 04:31 AM
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Originally Posted by lato4ka
Hi, I'm 135kg and I wanted to get a road bike but all the road bike max weight is 120kg . But I saw some other riders on road also look same size as me or even bigger but they are riding those market road bike .so anyone can provide me some advise
I would get a gravel bike with slightly wider tyres. A lot of those are also rated at 120 kg, but you will be fine. The limits are very conservative anyway, but a gravel bike will tend to have stronger wheels and components, which is likely to be the limiting factor regarding weight.
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Old 11-01-23, 05:19 AM
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It will handle it. Start with a used bicycle and get your way to a nice one in a few years. If you're motivated enough, you'll melt quickly.
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Old 11-01-23, 05:21 AM
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Originally Posted by lato4ka
Hi, I'm 135kg and I wanted to get a road bike but all the road bike max weight is 120kg . But I saw some other riders on road also look same size as me or even bigger but they are riding those market road bike .so anyone can provide me some advise
At one point in time I weighed more than you and I was riding this bike. I picked it up used and it was only a couple of years old when I got it. It had very solid wheels, 32 spoke mavic box rim with ultegra hubs. Never had an issue with the bike or wheels. Generally the frames are not going to cause you any issues, but you do need to make sure you are not rolling lightweight low spoke rims. Depending on the power output, 28 minimum spoke count would serve you well. At some point in time, I picked up some Boyd Altamont Alloy rims with 28 spoke on the rear and 24 on the front and they maintain trueness the 5 years that I owned them, as I lost weight. They are still rolling on a bike I sold to a friend of my wife.

So don't let the weight thing keep you from looking, just be smart about it and do some research, talk to a wheel builder so they will know what you riding conditions and needs are and they can recommend what would be best for you.

Edit, and these were 23mm tires on this bike, not the plush tires running these days. PeteHski mentioned gravel bike, that could be a great option if you can find a good used one.

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Old 11-01-23, 06:06 AM
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Wheels are the issue.

I would also avoid any real light weight type contact points - like light weight carbon bars or seat posts.

I started back riding at 118kg +/- - picked up a used bike with a mix of Dura Ace parts, Dura Ace wheels...

I cracked both wheels.

I also exploded a set of lightweight CF handlebars - with a very bad outcome.

I started riding a Cyclocross bike after that - bomb proof.

Then I moved to an aluminum Emonda with stock heavy parts, bomb proof for the most part. Had issues with freehubs, but the wheels stayed true.

As I lose weight and get down into "cyclist" weigh ranges, I am replacing the heavy stuff with lighter weight components.
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Old 11-01-23, 06:06 AM
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I weigh 250Lbs (113 kilos) and I recently bought the Niner RTL alloy (aluminum). Its built as tough as their MTB's which is pretty beefy. You can put up to 50mm 700c tires. It has to be one of the stoutest frames out there. I ride it on the road and the gravel using 38mm Panaracer Gravel king SS tires and DT Swiss E1800 wheels.

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Old 11-01-23, 09:03 AM
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If you aren't going to be racing like a pro athlete and riding extremely fast on a very bumpy road, I think you will be safe enough and the frame will handle it.

Welcome to BF
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Old 11-01-23, 11:41 AM
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I'm over 200 lbs. I ride road bikes with carbon wheels. Sometimes I have to true a wheel here or there. No biggie. I do ride at max tire pressure most of the time. Makes for some discomfort at times.
Keep more spokes in your wheels, they'll need them. 30-32s work well. No carbon seat posts. I have a collection of them all broken just above the clamp in the back of the tube ftpm flexing. That's not a place I want any carbon fiber splinters to have to be removed from. I prefer Thomson's.
You will have to expect higher maintenance. And higher parts failure. But it's still doable.
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Old 11-01-23, 12:05 PM
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welcome to BF. I hope you find your bike and enjoy cycling. I know some quite large people who ride mountain and road bikes - it's doable, and to me, quite admirable.
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Old 11-01-23, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by ls01
I'm over 200 lbs. I ride road bikes with carbon wheels. Sometimes I have to true a wheel here or there. No biggie. I do ride at max tire pressure most of the time. Makes for some discomfort at times.
Keep more spokes in your wheels, they'll need them. 30-32s work well. No carbon seat posts. I have a collection of them all broken just above the clamp in the back of the tube ftpm flexing. That's not a place I want any carbon fiber splinters to have to be removed from. I prefer Thomson's.
You will have to expect higher maintenance. And higher parts failure. But it's still doable.
Good point on the wheels.

The wheels I referenced above were aluminum Dura Ace with a very low spoke count. They cracked around the nipple area. Underbuilt to keep the weight down... Wheels that were designed for racer type builds, not clyde's.
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Old 11-01-23, 01:37 PM
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OP: bf has a subforum for Clydesdales -- that's the term for larger-than-typical cyclists. You might ask a moderator to move this thread over there, as those folks will have useful input for you.
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Old 11-02-23, 05:18 AM
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Just look in your local classifieds and buy an old consumer-grade steel road bike from the 80s on up for pocket-change and go riding, If you drop pounds in the future then you can buy one of the new throw-away carbon bikes that are trendy and fashionable today. I am well over 200 pounds and in my 60s and I just cut a 21.75mph lap around a local Time-Trial course on a road bike from the 1980s, something a lot of riders can not do no matter what bicycle they are on. For larger riders the weight of the bicycle is such a small percentage of the total bike/rider weight, that it is a waste of time worrying about how much the bicycle weighs within reason. For big people any bike that is 30 pounds is as good as one that weighs 20.
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Old 11-02-23, 05:57 AM
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If going fast is not your concern and getting fit is, consider a touring bike as an option.
Most are made of mid grade steel and have wide gear ranges. You will be more upright and the wheelsets are more robust to carry high weights.
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Old 11-02-23, 07:05 AM
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My older road bike is a steel Bianchi that has seen me as high as 107kg all the way down to a featherweight (for me) 80kg (about 90kg now). She’s 9.5kg, so while no featherweight, still quite respectable. Frame, carbon fork, and low spoke count wheels are all still in good shape, though the brake tracks are on their way out and the rear hub is shot.

I’ll recommend getting a good seatpost whatever you end up with, and not a single-bolt item - I ride Thomsons on my bikes. Having the bolt holding the saddle snap when you still have a long distance to go is not fun!
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Old 11-02-23, 03:13 PM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I would get a gravel bike with slightly wider tyres. A lot of those are also rated at 120 kg, but you will be fine. The limits are very conservative anyway, but a gravel bike will tend to have stronger wheels and components, which is likely to be the limiting factor regarding weight.
A gravel bike is a great suggestion for someone who is stockier and when paired with wheels having 28 spokes (each) should be fairly bombproof.
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Old 11-02-23, 05:06 PM
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Is the issue finding a bike shop that will let you test ride some of their inventory?
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Old 11-02-23, 07:39 PM
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I’ve ridden lots of bikes at 120 kilos. Are you sure you want a road bike? A lot of those “fitness hybrids” are pretty fast and if a workout is what you are after, you might find it more comfortable.

that being said pretty much any road bike would be fine. A light carbon road bike is kind of redundant at your weight, but it shouldn’t crack. I’d go with a cheap road bike and it will probably end up being aluminum and will work out totally fine.

what will break are your back wheels, with normal wheels you will break spokes, but this won’t make the wheel fail or you crash. You can get fancy wheels with lots of spokes, but personally I’ve never bothered. Breaking spokes is part of the game, just accept it and fix it or get it fixed when it happens, in my opinion.
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Old 11-03-23, 01:11 AM
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Originally Posted by LarrySellerz
.
what will break are your back wheels, with normal wheels you will break spokes, but this won’t make the wheel fail or you crash. You can get fancy wheels with lots of spokes, but personally I’ve never bothered. Breaking spokes is part of the game, just accept it and fix it or get it fixed when it happens, in my opinion.
Do you mean for heavier riders? I’m 80 kilos, started riding seriously at closer to 90 about 13 years ago and ridden low spoke count wheels most of that time, some radial and never broken one.
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Old 11-03-23, 04:02 AM
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Originally Posted by LarrySellerz
Breaking spokes is part of the game, just accept it and fix it or get it fixed when it happens, in my opinion.
Breaking spokes is very much an optional part of the game IMO.
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Old 11-03-23, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by LarrySellerz
I’ve ridden lots of bikes at 120 kilos. Are you sure you want a road bike? A lot of those “fitness hybrids” are pretty fast and if a workout is what you are after, you might find it more comfortable.

that being said pretty much any road bike would be fine. A light carbon road bike is kind of redundant at your weight, but it shouldn’t crack. I’d go with a cheap road bike and it will probably end up being aluminum and will work out totally fine.

what will break are your back wheels, with normal wheels you will break spokes, but this won’t make the wheel fail or you crash. You can get fancy wheels with lots of spokes, but personally I’ve never bothered. Breaking spokes is part of the game, just accept it and fix it or get it fixed when it happens, in my opinion.
Having broken a spoke or two when I was really heavy riding cheap wheels, it is not an option I would choose if I could avoid it. Getting the proper equipment for the job at hand is what you should shoot for, not fishing a rusted wheel out of a dumpster and going for a 100 mile ride and hoping you make it. Safety for everyone is the better part of the game. It has been over 15 years since I had a broken spoke and that is when I decided I needed to invest in some better quality wheels, and never had a wheel problem since. I can not remember the last time I had to have a wheel trued.
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Old 11-03-23, 06:36 PM
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Be kind of cool if the OP ever came back and acknowledged any of the advice people spent their time contributing.
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Old 11-03-23, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by jaxgtr
Having broken a spoke or two when I was really heavy riding cheap wheels, it is not an option I would choose if I could avoid it. Getting the proper equipment for the job at hand is what you should shoot for, not fishing a rusted wheel out of a dumpster and going for a 100 mile ride and hoping you make it. Safety for everyone is the better part of the game. It has been over 15 years since I had a broken spoke and that is when I decided I needed to invest in some better quality wheels, and never had a wheel problem since. I can not remember the last time I had to have a wheel trued.
OP may need a link to the dumpster find vodka thread to grasp the reference to dumpster diving.
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Old 11-06-23, 09:05 PM
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I am a member of the 1/8-ton+ crowd, and I ride low-spoke-count wheels and hard skinny tires (23s) on half my bikes, and nothing more than 28 mm and 32 spokes on any bikes but my MTB. I don't break frames, spokes, seat posts, stems, cranks .... the stuff is tough. Manufacturers put max-load ratings on their bikes for insurance reasons ... some people will do massive abuse to their bikes for no reason and refuse to take responsibility ..... but I have loaded my touring bikes with ridiculous loads of gear and ridden ridiculous distances with no harm, and no failures.

Unless or are 220 kg or some such .... just buy a bike. If you weigh 220 kg, I recommend 36-spoke rims at least---look into wheels for tandems.

Just get out there on a bike. Even for fat guys, it is a ton of fun. Don't the skinny guys have it all to themselves ... make some for yourself.
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