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New endurance bike

Old 11-10-23, 07:27 PM
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New endurance bike

Coming off a 2013 Specialized Roubaix, which rode like a dream. Starting to look for a new ride for the spring. I know I need to test ride and I will. Staying with a LBS.

Looking at the following.

Scott Addict 10 Rival AXS
Trek Domane
Cannondale Synapse

One of my questions is this.

Is there a big difference between traditional and dropped seat stays? The Addict and Synaspe have the dropped stays, while the Domane still has the traditional setup.

Also, anyone ridding any of these bikes? If so, what are your thoughts.
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Old 11-10-23, 07:46 PM
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I'd go with the Trek. I've kinda wondered why some use the dropped stays, it can't be for improving the looks.... that imo is an unfavorable look. As if someone slapped a 20" drop stay on to a 29" diamond. lol
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Old 11-10-23, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by frdfandc

Is there a big difference between traditional and dropped seat stays?
No.
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Old 11-10-23, 09:03 PM
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If you have Trek in your options, and having just building up a Trek Checkpoint and also having a Gen 4 Domane, do not rule out the Checkpoint. Close geometry to the Domane, rides like a dream, and gives you a lot of options whether you want to ride on or offroad. Has a buttload of mounting point if you want to tour or short bike packing stuff, and based on the model, has internal downtube storage. I love my Domane, but this bike could easily become my only bike as all I have to do is swap tires or get a second wheelset based on what type of riding I want to do on it.

Just something to keep in mind.
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Old 11-11-23, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by jaxgtr
If you have Trek in your options, and having just building up a Trek Checkpoint and also having a Gen 4 Domane, do not rule out the Checkpoint. Close geometry to the Domane, rides like a dream, and gives you a lot of options whether you want to ride on or offroad. Has a buttload of mounting point if you want to tour or short bike packing stuff, and based on the model, has internal downtube storage. I love my Domane, but this bike could easily become my only bike as all I have to do is swap tires or get a second wheelset based on what type of riding I want to do on it.

Just something to keep in mind.
Took mine out with the 25mm wheelset today. Rides brilliantly on the road (although those tyres do look a BIT anaemic in those big forks) and way more versatile than the Domane. I love the ergonomics of those GRX shifters.
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Old 11-11-23, 12:07 PM
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I have a Domane and a Checkpoint. I like them both, but theCheckpoint has become the bike I prefer. I can't tell the differences in frame geometry by riding, but the Checkpoint is a much softer ride because of the40mm tires. The Checkpoint could easily be my only bike with no complaints.
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Old 11-11-23, 02:18 PM
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Dumb question: what’s wrong with the Roubaix??
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Old 11-11-23, 02:37 PM
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Dropped stays might give you more flex for saddle to absorb some bumps before they make it to your butt. But that is a "might". It's going to depend on other things like the thickness of the tubes, carbon layup and other things unique to each bike.

If you can, just ride the bikes for as much distance as you can get away with before making your purchase. I was all set to buy one size from a ride in the parking lot, but the dealer said they'd let me ride two different sizes of the same bike on the 11 mile MUP nearby. I chose the other frame size after that ride. The experience was way different than even the large parking lot at the bike shop.
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Old 11-11-23, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by datlas
Dumb question: whatís wrong with the Roubaix??

I'm looking at a Rival AXS equipped bike. The Rival equipped Roubaix is a little out of my price range. I know it comes with carbon wheels, which bumps the price over 5k. I'm looking to stay in the $3800-4200 range. The Domane is an exception because I found a Gen 3 full Ultegra available at Trek for $4200. I found 3 the last time I was out.
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Old 11-11-23, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by frdfandc
I'm looking at a Rival AXS equipped bike. The Rival equipped Roubaix is a little out of my price range. I know it comes with carbon wheels, which bumps the price over 5k. I'm looking to stay in the $3800-4200 range. The Domane is an exception because I found a Gen 3 full Ultegra available at Trek for $4200. I found 3 the last time I was out.

Is the Domane an SLR7 or SL7? The Gen 4 Domane frame is a far superior ride than the Gen 3, and I have had both. The Gen 3 has a very dead feeling ride due to the front IsoSpeed which just was not needed, plus is added amazing amount of weight.

If you want to go the Domane route, look at getting a Gen 4 frame and build it to your specs, then you can eliminate the need to replace things down the road. You can locate excellent condition used parts or pulls from new bikes, etc. I have a few things sitting around I will be offering up, but have not done anything with them yet, but they are all in fantastic condition. Then either yourself or your local shop can put it together. As far as the carbon wheels, while they are nice, you can get some really nice alloy wheels that will give you just as nice a ride as a lower end carbon and they will save you, in a lot of cases, weight and money.

I am betting around the black Friday timeframe, you should be able to pick up some really nice deals on things. My Checkpoint build gave me a slightly higher quality build for less cost than the price of the Checkpoint SL7 and this includes a new set of wheels which I was not really planning on. If you dig around, you can finds some good deals on parts.
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Old 11-11-23, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by jaxgtr
Is the Domane an SLR7 or SL7? The Gen 4 Domane frame is a far superior ride than the Gen 3, and I have had both. The Gen 3 has a very dead feeling ride due to the front IsoSpeed which just was not needed, plus is added amazing amount of weight.

If you want to go the Domane route, look at getting a Gen 4 frame and build it to your specs, then you can eliminate the need to replace things down the road. You can locate excellent condition used parts or pulls from new bikes, etc. I have a few things sitting around I will be offering up, but have not done anything with them yet, but they are all in fantastic condition. Then either yourself or your local shop can put it together. As far as the carbon wheels, while they are nice, you can get some really nice alloy wheels that will give you just as nice a ride as a lower end carbon and they will save you, in a lot of cases, weight and money.

I am betting around the black Friday timeframe, you should be able to pick up some really nice deals on things. My Checkpoint build gave me a slightly higher quality build for less cost than the price of the Checkpoint SL7 and this includes a new set of wheels which I was not really planning on. If you dig around, you can finds some good deals on parts.

It's an SL 6. I've been looking at just frames for a custom build.
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Old 11-12-23, 12:06 AM
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Since the possibility of using a Trek Cechkpoint as an endurance bike was raised, I have some input on that.

I have both a 2022 Trek Checkpoint SL 5 and a 2023 Trek Domane SLR 7, gen 4. Both are great bikes. The Domane is still the better road bike. Though I have a set of road wheels for the Checkpoint. I find the Domane to be faster, even with the same wheels. I have no idea why. I also like the feel of the Domane better. Perhaps that's the SLR vs SL frame. Or maybe it's the difference between the way the rear Isospeed is implemented.

While the frames are similar they are not exactly the same. I ride a 58 Checkpoint and a 60 Domane to get the same contact point positions. The Domane geometry is a bit misleading because there is a large plastic piece that functions like a stem spacer that must always be there. So it is effectively part of the head tube, but is not taken into consideration when showing the frame geometry. You cannot simply compare frame specs. Also, the Domane comes standard with a +7 deg stem and the Checkpoint with a -7 degree stem. If I recall I think the standard Checkpoint stems are shorter to compensate for the longer frames and wheelbase.

The Checkpoint also has a higher BB and therefore you also sit higher and have an overall higher center of gravity. This may very well contribute to why I prefer the feel of the Domane over the Checkpoint.

While the Checkpoint is a great bike, and if you only had one road style bike I would get one. And in fact that's exactly why I got mine. But a Domane is a true endurance road bike and is that little bit better at that.

I also agree that you want the gen 4 Domane. At least based on all the things I read about that. While I splurged on the SLR 7, you can still get most of the same bike for a lot less. Though I really like the carbon wheels that came with mine.

Anyway, I can't say enough good things about the Domane gen 4. And since you're looking at building it up yourself, you clearly can get everything else to be exactly what you want. Sounds like a lot of fun to do that.
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Old 11-12-23, 10:38 AM
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I agree with the Gen IV being the one to roll with.

I've dedicated the Gen III Domane to cold poor climate conditions as I've became spoiled by the Gen IV Domane slight improvements. No regerts in the executive decision.
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Old 11-12-23, 05:18 PM
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Regarding the Domane, I agree with the previous recommendations... stick with Gen 4. If you're mostly doing road riding, the Domane makes more sense than the Checkpoint. If you mostly do gravel, then the Checkpoint probably makes more sense. If you are looking for one bike than can do both, the Domane (in my opinion) is the clear winner. The Domane, while designed for road racing on less than smooth paved surfaces, can easily be set up for most gravel riding; I don't think the Checkpoint makes a great road bike.

As for geometry, the Checkpoint has a much longer reach compared to the Domane. You can definitely compensate for the reach difference with a shorter stem on the Checkpoint or a longer stem on the Domane. Gravel bikes typically have shorter stems anyhow.

Best of luck with your search and final selection. It's always fun shopping for a new bike!
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Old 11-12-23, 08:22 PM
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I don't have interest in a gravel bike. The roughest paths I'll be riding is crushed gravel like rail trails.

I've actually upped my budget to 5k. And I think I found my next bike. Canyon Endurance CF SLX 8 Force AXS. $5500. Better value than what Trek, Specialized, Giant, Cannondale, or almost any other MFG out their.
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Old 11-13-23, 05:27 AM
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Originally Posted by frdfandc
I don't have interest in a gravel bike. The roughest paths I'll be riding is crushed gravel like rail trails.

I've actually upped my budget to 5k. And I think I found my next bike. Canyon Endurance CF SLX 8 Force AXS. $5500. Better value than what Trek, Specialized, Giant, Cannondale, or almost any other MFG out their.
yeah thatís because they sell direct with the consequent customer service challenges.
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Old 11-13-23, 05:45 AM
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Originally Posted by choddo
yeah thatís because they sell direct with the consequent customer service challenges.
I took that risk for a saving of literally £2,000 over the other similar spec bikes I was considering at the time. But Canyon customer service in the UK is actually good. Canít speak for the US though and I know itís a different setup there.
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Old 11-13-23, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I took that risk for a saving of literally £2,000 over the other similar spec bikes I was considering at the time. But Canyon customer service in the UK is actually good. Canít speak for the US though and I know itís a different setup there.
Cool and yes itís an attractive price point. I have friends (in the UK) who have found it a bit troublesome, if something goes wrong, to not have a physical retailer to deal with.
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Old 11-13-23, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by PeteHski
I took that risk for a saving of literally £2,000 over the other similar spec bikes I was considering at the time. But Canyon customer service in the UK is actually good. Can’t speak for the US though and I know it’s a different setup there.
it is not great here in the US i really like my cf8 but you never hear back on emails and you can be in the phone que for hours only to get someone who can’t help. If you go to the Canyon fb or red d it canyon page you see lots of people are having issues getting cs. a fair amount of people have had issues getting stem top caps which being 1 1/4 are not all that readily available in the US and recently I decided it might be a good idea to get a rear derailleur hanger and that is no longer made or available and that is for a 2023 bike. reaching out to Canyon is futile....

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Old 11-13-23, 08:40 AM
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As already pointed out, Canyon does well at providing good value for money due to their direct to consumer model. I've never dealt with their customer service, so I can speak to that issue.

As a bike mechanic I can tell you that many service departments at local bike shops dislike Canyon (because of their direct to consumer model). Some bike shops won't even work on Canyons for that very reason. Personally, I don't mind. I'm happy to work on your bike whether you bought it from us, another LBS, or online.

What does bother me is when a customer orders a bike online from one of the brands we represent, and then they have it shipped to the shop for us to build it. The LBS does all of the same work it would have done if the customer bought it directly from the LBS, but the LBS only receives a small fee from the manufacturer for building the bike and the LBS loses out entirely on any profit from the sale. It's a "money grab" by the manufacturers and yet another way that brands are squeezing their dealer networks at both ends. All the brands are doing it, so it is what it is. As a LBS you can't escape it unless you go to a service-only business model in which you don't represent any brands and basically don't sell bikes other than doing custom builds.

OK, back to the regular scheduled program. I don't mean to hijack or sidetrack the thread. The Canyon is a good choice as long as the geometry works for you.
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Old 11-13-23, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by frdfandc
I'm looking at a Rival AXS equipped bike. The Rival equipped Roubaix is a little out of my price range. I know it comes with carbon wheels, which bumps the price over 5k. I'm looking to stay in the $3800-4200 range. The Domane is an exception because I found a Gen 3 full Ultegra available at Trek for $4200. I found 3 the last time I was out.
I am guessing the 2013 Roubaix is either gone and/or you want something with Disc brakes. Yes?

The choice of Canyon is a good one. Let us know how you like it!
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Old 11-13-23, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Turnin_Wrenches
As already pointed out, Canyon does well at providing good value for money due to their direct to consumer model. I've never dealt with their customer service, so I can speak to that issue.

As a bike mechanic I can tell you that many service departments at local bike shops dislike Canyon (because of their direct to consumer model). Some bike shops won't even work on Canyons for that very reason. Personally, I don't mind. I'm happy to work on your bike whether you bought it from us, another LBS, or online.

What does bother me is when a customer orders a bike online from one of the brands we represent, and then they have it shipped to the shop for us to build it. The LBS does all of the same work it would have done if the customer bought it directly from the LBS, but the LBS only receives a small fee from the manufacturer for building the bike and the LBS loses out entirely on any profit from the sale. It's a "money grab" by the manufacturers and yet another way that brands are squeezing their dealer networks at both ends. All the brands are doing it, so it is what it is. As a LBS you can't escape it unless you go to a service-only business model in which you don't represent any brands and basically don't sell bikes other than doing custom builds.

OK, back to the regular scheduled program. I don't mean to hijack or sidetrack the thread. The Canyon is a good choice as long as the geometry works for you.
Not to derail thread via above comment, but if this is a NEW bike then the manufacturer is shooting itself in the foot by angering their dealers. I think a DTC like Canyon (or even, shudder, bikesdirect.com) makes sense, but competing DTC with the dealers does not make sense to me unless the brand is moving towards completely DTC.
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Old 11-13-23, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by choddo
yeah thatís because they sell direct with the consequent customer service challenges.

This has been a consideration in the decision, but for a $2k cost savings, I'm willing to take the risk.
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Old 11-13-23, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by datlas
I am guessing the 2013 Roubaix is either gone and/or you want something with Disc brakes. Yes?

The choice of Canyon is a good one. Let us know how you like it!

Yes to both. Sold the Roubaix last year and want something with discs.

I'll definitely give it a good review.
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Old 11-13-23, 01:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Turnin_Wrenches

As a bike mechanic I can tell you that many service departments at local bike shops dislike Canyon (because of their direct to consumer model). Some bike shops won't even work on Canyons for that very reason. Personally, I don't mind. I'm happy to work on your bike whether you bought it from us, another LBS, or online.
That used to happen over here in the UK when Canyon first appeared, but the smarter shops soon realised it was a very stupid strategy. What if a customer owns a Canyon and several other bikes from various different brands? The shop refuses to service their Canyon and they inevitably lose a potential lifetime customer.

Here in the UK Canyon now has a list of friendly independent shops that are happy to take the business. They get paid for the bike service and the customer may buy other stuff from the shop. Maybe even another bike at some point.
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