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Getting the urge again for N+1

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Getting the urge again for N+1

Old 05-18-24, 03:10 PM
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Getting the urge again for N+1

I currently ride a Kuota Kredo with Chorus 10, and while it still rides fine, and I've kept it up, maybe it is time for something new. I'm considering what would have been a step down from that in a 105 equipped Cdale Super Six Evo, or Canyon Endurace. Trek, Spec and Giant would be considered too. Would I be happy with these after riding a custom build for all these years? When I bought the Kuota I posted it here and everybody drooled over it!
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Old 05-18-24, 04:57 PM
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Originally Posted by zacster
I currently ride a Kuota Kredo with Chorus 10, and while it still rides fine, and I've kept it up, maybe it is time for something new. I'm considering what would have been a step down from that in a 105 equipped Cdale Super Six Evo, or Canyon Endurace. Trek, Spec and Giant would be considered too. Would I be happy with these after riding a custom build for all these years? When I bought the Kuota I posted it here and everybody drooled over it!
A new bike is always sweet, but youíre still gonna want to personalize a new bike if specíing custom builds has been your thing. Itís rare OE kit is compelling.
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Old 05-19-24, 07:47 AM
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I have 5 road bikes. They are a CAAD 12, Guru Sidero (steel), Guru Photon, Masi Gran Criterium S, and my latest Canyon Aeroad CF SL. My wife recently bought a Canyon Ultimate CF SLX. All of mine have mechanical shifting. (Hers has DI 2.) Everything from 105-Ultegra-Dura Ace and SRAM Red. I love each one of these bikes but the one I reach for is the Canyon Aeroad and my wife loves her Canyon Ultimate. I can't say enough good things about those bikes. If I wanted an endurance type bike I'd go with an Endurace.
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Old 05-19-24, 08:13 AM
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I used Campy drivetrains for 25 years, including 12 speed. I switched to SRAM Force AXS four years ago to get a little lower gearing and would never go back to mechanical shifting. AXS wireless is incredibly easy to install. Disc brakes of course, with 25mm internal width hookless rims that require no rim tape. With 28mm tires front and 30mm rear, only 53psi air pressure is required, which gives a great ride.

I still prefer to buy a frame and build it up, but my latest N+1 is a Cervelo Rouvida with Rival that's obviously something you have to buy pre-built. I needed a larger setback seatpost, longer stem and different tires and wheels to get it setup for me. The higher level models are a rip off. Same bike with over priced parts upgrade.

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Old 05-19-24, 08:24 AM
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Only you know the nature of your desire to obtain/possess another bike. What is missing in your riding or what idea of the possible pleasure would result from adding one of these bikes? I have made mistakes and dumped bikes that did not deliver and don't regret the experience at all.
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Old 05-19-24, 10:14 AM
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Part of the allure (for me) to getting a newer bike is to avail myself of wider road tire capabilities with tubeless. Better brakes with disc, newer frame technologies to tweak the ride to lower weight, etc..

With all this said, I am a throwback "vintage" type rider who is running rim brakes, being limited to no wider than 25mm tires and enjoying my tubeless 25 mm tires and tuning my "vintage" stuff . I'm always amazed how "tunable" bikes can be and somewhat surprised that more riders thrash and run super great parts into the ground while making many of the same mistakes that led to their perception that the old ride is less desirable.

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Old 06-01-24, 11:37 AM
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Let me bump this to answer some questions/comments.

My riding is one or two 40-50 mile rides per week, with laps of Prospect Park to fill in at 15 to 20 miles. I'll also do an occasional century once I feel fit. I tend to push it within the limits of my 69 year old heart, and that's been pretty hard these days. For example yesterday I did 52 miles along the beachfront, so it was flat. But flat lets me really go hard, especially if there are no intersections. Today I'm going to do 3 or 4 laps of the park just to loosen up a bit. Earlier this week I did 40+ miles starting with a 3 mile climb where the grade went over 10% in places. The rest of the ride felt like a slog. My winter riding is on the trainer and I'd keep my current bike for that. No sense in putting extra stress and wear on a brand new bike if I still have it.

I ride with 28 in the front and 25 in the rear because those are the max that fit. I'm OK with that. I rented a Roubaix a few years ago in San Francisco and I really appreciated the very wide gearing and the disc brakes, for up and down those hills. I believe it was 105 11sp with 11-34 in the back and 50-34 in the front. That 34/34 combo got me up those streets.

My current desire is to go AXS wireless, and the reviews I've read seem to say that all of the SRAM AXS are good and all you save is a little weight with the higher end. Campy just got too expensive and I wouldn't consider it again. I remember back when I put the bike together I had test rode an Ultegra 10sp equipped bike and I hated the shifting, and that's why I went Campy. The one at a time shifts felt limiting.

For my next task today though I'm going to replace chain, cassette and pulley wheels on my current ride. It may be some time before I really buy and in the meantime I'm going to ride.
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Old 06-01-24, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by zacster
Let me bump this to answer some questions/comments.

My riding is one or two 40-50 mile rides per week, with laps of Prospect Park to fill in at 15 to 20 miles. I'll also do an occasional century once I feel fit. I tend to push it within the limits of my 69 year old heart, and that's been pretty hard these days. For example yesterday I did 52 miles along the beachfront, so it was flat. But flat lets me really go hard, especially if there are no intersections. Today I'm going to do 3 or 4 laps of the park just to loosen up a bit. Earlier this week I did 40+ miles starting with a 3 mile climb where the grade went over 10% in places. The rest of the ride felt like a slog. My winter riding is on the trainer and I'd keep my current bike for that. No sense in putting extra stress and wear on a brand new bike if I still have it.

I ride with 28 in the front and 25 in the rear because those are the max that fit. I'm OK with that. I rented a Roubaix a few years ago in San Francisco and I really appreciated the very wide gearing and the disc brakes, for up and down those hills. I believe it was 105 11sp with 11-34 in the back and 50-34 in the front. That 34/34 combo got me up those streets.

My current desire is to go AXS wireless, and the reviews I've read seem to say that all of the SRAM AXS are good and all you save is a little weight with the higher end. Campy just got too expensive and I wouldn't consider it again. I remember back when I put the bike together I had test rode an Ultegra 10sp equipped bike and I hated the shifting, and that's why I went Campy. The one at a time shifts felt limiting.

For my next task today though I'm going to replace chain, cassette and pulley wheels on my current ride. It may be some time before I really buy and in the meantime I'm going to ride.
Sounds like you just want a new bike...and there is nothing wrong with that. I was in a similar boat a couple months ago...in my case, my "old" bike is a Canyon Endurace with Ultegra mechanical 11 speed. It's hydro disc and has generous tire clearance, so I didn't really have a good reason for upgrading. I had been looking at new bikes, but initially couldn't justify a new road bike. Finally, one of the shifters busted in the middle of a ride, and I ordered a new Canyon Ultimate SLX with Di2 Ultegra 12 speed as soon as I got home. The shifter ended up being an easy fix for me, but the new bike scratched an itch that I'd been having...no regrets and I've been riding the wheels off the Ultimate. The Endurace is still an awesome backup and/or trainer bike for me.

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Old 06-02-24, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Sierra_rider
Sounds like you just want a new bike...and there is nothing wrong with that. I was in a similar boat a couple months ago...in my case, my "old" bike is a Canyon Endurace with Ultegra mechanical 11 speed. It's hydro disc and has generous tire clearance, so I didn't really have a good reason for upgrading. I had been looking at new bikes, but initially couldn't justify a new road bike. Finally, one of the shifters busted in the middle of a ride, and I ordered a new Canyon Ultimate SLX with Di2 Ultegra 12 speed as soon as I got home. The shifter ended up being an easy fix for me, but the new bike scratched an itch that I'd been having...no regrets and I've been riding the wheels of the Ultimate. The Endurace is still an awesome backup and/or trainer bike for me.
It's a little more than just wanting a new bike, although there is a lot of that too. The gearing and the braking are better now, not that I couldn't stop when I descended after my 10% grade climb, but disc brakes take a lot less hand pressure to engage. When I ride any newer CF bike I feel like the damping is even better.

I put the new cassette and chain on it and it does shift a lot better now. Campy 10 always did shift well and allowed multiple shifts up and down. And as far as mechanical vs. electronic shifting there is something to be said for the feel of mechanical. I've never been on an electronic shifting bike so maybe I won't like that. I'd imagine there would be a slight lag.

If your old bike is a Canyon Endurace you are way ahead of me and already replacing it.
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Old 06-02-24, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by zacster
I I've never been on an electronic shifting bike so maybe I won't like that. I'd imagine there would be a slight lag.
Never tried electronic shifting myself (purely for budget reasons) but from what I hear it is quicker and smoother and far less demanding than mechanical.

Talked to a lot of riders who say they would never go back ... have seen a few posts from Luddites who claim to hate it but you know how some folks can be .... hating is their love .... Plus electronic systems (at least a lot of them) are programmable so you can tailor shift patterns, from direct one-to-one shifting to the chip automatically suggesting the next ratio, even if it a double shift, and all kinds of other things ... plus you (with some systems) you can mount mini-shift buttons so you have perfect reach to the shifters in different hand positions.
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Old 06-02-24, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs
Never tried electronic shifting myself (purely for budget reasons) but from what I hear it is quicker and smoother and far less demanding than mechanical.

Talked to a lot of riders who say they would never go back ... have seen a few posts from Luddites who claim to hate it but you know how some folks can be .... hating is their love .... Plus electronic systems (at least a lot of them) are programmable so you can tailor shift patterns, from direct one-to-one shifting to the chip automatically suggesting the next ratio, even if it a double shift, and all kinds of other things ... plus you (with some systems) you can mount mini-shift buttons so you have perfect reach to the shifters in different hand positions.
I've said a number of times myself the electronic shifting will take over, and that someone will produce it cheap. It will use an open protocol that everyone will latch onto and you'll be able to mix and match easily because it'll all be programmable from your device. Levers will be reduced to buttons. SRAM is already close to this but it'll get much cheaper. You'll even be able to mix and match # of speeds. The old cable pull spec will be meaningless and you'll tell the program how much lateral movement you need from your derailleur based on cog spacing. The derailleurs will know how to make that movement, or "dumb" derailleurs will be told. Your Wahoo or Garmin computer will know what gear you're in and display it. It might even know how to shift based on grade, cadence and speed to optimize pedaling.

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Old 06-02-24, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by zacster
It's a little more than just wanting a new bike, although there is a lot of that too. The gearing and the braking are better now, not that I couldn't stop when I descended after my 10% grade climb, but disc brakes take a lot less hand pressure to engage. When I ride any newer CF bike I feel like the damping is even better.

I put the new cassette and chain on it and it does shift a lot better now. Campy 10 always did shift well and allowed multiple shifts up and down. And as far as mechanical vs. electronic shifting there is something to be said for the feel of mechanical. I've never been on an electronic shifting bike so maybe I won't like that. I'd imagine there would be a slight lag.

If your old bike is a Canyon Endurace you are way ahead of me and already replacing it.
I really like the gearing on the new bikes. Both my Endurace and Ultimate have 50/34 paired with 11-34...difference is the Endurace is 11 speed and the Ultimate is 12. There is a slightly annoying gap between the 11 and 13 cogs on the 11 speed, there are no annoying gaps on the 12 speed. 10 speed would be even more happy to maintain the same range. I'm up in the mountains and frequently do extended descents, so I appreciate disc brakes. As far as ride quality, my older gen Endurace CF SL rides amazing on rough roads...it's still my choice for rides involving really rough roads or lighter gravel, but not enough of it to justify my gravel bike.

No lag with electronic, virtually instantaneous and definitely quicker than mechanical. I wouldn't go as far as to say that I can't ever go back to mechanical, because I do switch back and forth...but if I could, I'd prefer that all my bikes were electronic.

My Endurace is a 2020 model...not really "old," but it definitely has some hours/miles on it. There wasn't really a good justification for the purchase of my Ultimate, other than "I wanted it." I do appreciate the weight of the Ultimate, and it climbs and sprints like a dream, although any performance gains are marginal at best.
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Old 06-04-24, 07:44 AM
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I took a longer ride on my current bike with the new drivetrain and I'm feeling less of an urge to buy something new now. I'm going to replace the brake pads next so maybe that'll be all I really need.
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Old 06-14-24, 04:12 PM
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So today I took my daughter's Cannondale Super Six Evo for a ride again. When I first built it up for her I did a 30 mile or so ride and it felt really good to ride, but today I wasn't so sure. It is a very light frame, the lightest production frame at the time and maybe still is, but the components were pulled off her prior bike that she outgrew and these were nothing special. This one is a 48, which is the recommended size for me based on current measurements, but is also a WSD so a little shorter. Anyway, between my bike and this one I'd stick with mine. Don't get me wrong though, the Super Six is an incredible bike. Maybe I need to try it with lighter wheels. The ones on it were stock wheels from a lower end Specialized Dolce Vita. They must come in at 2000g+ but they are the only 9sp wheels I have to go with the 105 9sp.

Also as another consideration my own bike has a Redshift Shockstop stem and this one has a standard stem. After a few miles I noticed the difference going over a bumpy road. A lot of the higher end bikes these days have proprietary stem/bar combos which would prevent using one, or at least mean changing the entire front end.
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Old 06-14-24, 06:17 PM
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Funny, you are looking to add, and I am trying to unload a couple. I have really enjoyed the my CheckPoint and just picked up a new set of wheels just for road tires when I want to just ride the road, the one bike to rule them all as it were.
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Old 06-15-24, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by jaxgtr
Funny, you are looking to add, and I am trying to unload a couple. I have really enjoyed the my CheckPoint and just picked up a new set of wheels just for road tires when I want to just ride the road, the one bike to rule them all as it were.
And I use a Shockstop stem on my Checkpoint. Such a versatile bike.
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Old 06-16-24, 02:37 AM
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Get a recumbent.
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Old 06-16-24, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Maelochs
Get a recumbent.
Surely you jest.
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Old 06-17-24, 01:34 PM
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I don't understand the thread title....my understanding is that the state of desiring an N+1 is a constant state of mind, not something that can happen again and again!

Life is short, if you want another bike and can afford one, buy it! I need extremely tenuous self-justification to get a +1!!
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Old 06-17-24, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by bruce19
I have 5 road bikes.
Good man, that's the spirit!

I'm on 5 road bikes and currently building #6.

Or #7 if I include the tandem!
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Old 06-17-24, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Groasters
I don't understand the thread title....my understanding is that the state of desiring an N+1 is a constant state of mind, not something that can happen again and again!

Life is short, if you want another bike and can afford one, buy it! I need extremely tenuous self-justification to get a +1!!
There does come a point in your life that you realize you won't be able to ride forever, and that the next bike may not get enough use to make it worthwhile. While I've certainly gotten enough use out of my 19 year old Kuota Kredo, I may only get 3 or 4 years out of anything new. In the meantime I was riding yesterday and chatted with someone riding a Canyon that I'm looking at. Some other guy comes speeding past and I said "let's catch him!" He just couldn't do it while I just cranked it out. It isn't always the bike. My bike is good enough and wouldn't hold anybody back. Sure, mechanical shifting, rim brakes. It doesn't have the latest headset/stem/bar combos. Do those make you faster? Or disc brakes. Maybe the Di2/AXS is faster shifting, but my Chorus 10 is still snappy after I replaced the chain/cassette/pulleys.
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Old 06-17-24, 04:39 PM
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Old 06-17-24, 11:35 PM
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Originally Posted by zacster
. It doesn't have the latest headset/stem/bar combos. Do those make you faster?
Yes by about 0.1W. but more importantly they make you look faster. And have to resort to getting the LBS to change your cables as you just canít face it. Ours add a surcharge for my Madone cabling because itís such a pita.
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Old 06-18-24, 08:16 AM
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Originally Posted by choddo
Yes by about 0.1W. but more importantly they make you look faster. And have to resort to getting the LBS to change your cables as you just canít face it. Ours add a surcharge for my Madone cabling because itís such a pita.
I look faster when I'm going faster!
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