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Sewup users & traditional latex tube tubulars

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Sewup users & traditional latex tube tubulars

Old 06-12-24, 01:23 AM
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Sewup users & traditional latex tube tubulars

So I just bought my first racing bike a Gios Turino super record in blue of course .and it came with these old dry Hutchinson Tempo 2's . the wheels are lovely Mavic GEL 208's I live in NYC and want a nice ride . The tires on there now feel rather nice and supple but will have to be replaced due to age and a lump in the rear one. In a previous post it seems that " sew-ups " , or traditional latex, have a very nice ride I would like some recommendations and opinions and if anyone has an old pair of something that will fit my wheels . Any thoughts would be appreciated.
Thanks .
Just on my budgetary considerations are medium or a little above.

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Old 06-12-24, 04:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Alexthe
So I just bought my first racing bike a Gios Turino super record in blue of course .and it came with these old dry Hutchinson Tempo 2's . the wheels are lovely Mavic GEL 208's I live in NYC and want a nice ride . The tires on there now feel rather nice and supple but will have to be replaced due to age and a lump in the rear one. In a previous post it seems that " sew-ups " , or traditional latex, have a very nice ride I would like some recommendations and opinions and if anyone has an old pair of something that will fit my wheels . Any thoughts would be appreciated.
Thanks .
Just on my budgetary considerations are medium or a little above.
The name is Mavic GEL 280, not 208. (The 280 represents the nominal rim weight, although they apparently average about 295 gm.)

"Sew-ups" is the name used for all stitched-together tubular tires, regardless of the tube material.

I spent the years from 1964 to about 1990 riding tubulars. If I were still willing to put up with the disadvantages of tubulars to the extent of installing them on one of my bikes to ride every once in a while, I'd get new, high-end tires. (Contrary to what some claim, tubulars do not improve with age. That's according to the tubular tire manufacturers, as surveyed a few years ago by a Bicycling! magazine writer.)
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Old 06-12-24, 08:43 AM
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How much do you want to pay?
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Old 06-12-24, 01:03 PM
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Are you planning on racing your bike? I have been racing on tubulars on the road and track. I do not use them for training and general riding. Tubulars are expensive to buy and maintain. I train and ride on GP 5000 with latex tubes. That set up is smooth riding, fast and less expensive to maintain.
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Old 06-12-24, 10:16 PM
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We only ride sew-ups/tubulars now having done clinchers for 3-4 years. Now we are two old people singles, and tandem but 40 years doing this stuff with a fast kid that raced - and starting again (he says).
I used the clinchers for a while - not racing. Way back when I raced - it was tubulars. Riding coast to coast - it was tubulars.
Fast kid rides clincher/tubeless training, but tubulars racing. I think he also rides some huge tubulars 36mm on his regular bike.
I *think* you know you need different rims. The typical sewup/tubular discussion is generally around a racing / crit tubular and as that is the forum, I assume that is what you want to know about.
In all cases mounting and patching a tubular is going to be more difficult. In most cases you will not flat as much and you can find something higher performance and lower cost.
Much depends where (like the gutter or geography) you ride. None of us get flats much (maybe 1/5 of clinchers) so we just ride sew-ups because they are lighter and more robust per $ and weight and as an old guy, I still enjoy performance even though I'm slow.
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Old 06-13-24, 09:09 AM
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Doge ^^^^ Yeah but you have a low racing license number.

I love to ride on tubulars - fast, light, responsive and etc. I ride Tufo 125 19 mm, pumped to 160+ psi at the indoor, Siberian pine, wooden track. The Tufo 125 does not have an inner tube. It is just a casing. It is light and matches the rim of the wheels perfectly. Without an inner tube there are no hysteresis losses. These will not work on the road or outdoor track. They would wear out too quickly.
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Old 06-13-24, 09:29 AM
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Even cheap tubulars ride better than cheap clinchers. But nowadays, the best clinchers ride nicely.
Still, IMO, expensive sewups like offerings from Veloflex or Vittoria ($80-100ea) ride better than anything else out there.
Their tire life poses the biggest obstacle, because one might get only half the mileage of the best clinchers.
The "Totally Tubular" sub-forum thread covers this topic very well. Check it out.
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Old 06-13-24, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Hermes
Are you planning on racing your bike? I have been racing on tubulars on the road and track. I do not use them for training and general riding. Tubulars are expensive to buy and maintain. I train and ride on GP 5000 with latex tubes. That set up is smooth riding, fast and less expensive to maintain.
Same here. My road race bike (a ~2017 Venge) has 24c Specialized Turbo Cottons and latex tubes. Very suitable for the kind of criterium and road racing in our district (SCNCA).

Road racing and TT: Clincher with latex tube
Road training: Clincher with TPU tube. Will probably switch to tubeless and a bigger tire in the future (see the current tubeless thread for discussion)
Track: Tubular
MTB: tubeless of course
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Old 06-13-24, 10:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Hermes
Are you planning on racing your bike? I have been racing on tubulars on the road and track. I do not use them for training and general riding. Tubulars are expensive to buy and maintain. I train and ride on GP 5000 with latex tubes. That set up is smooth riding, fast and less expensive to maintain.
Appreciate the suggestion I will definitely consider it. No I am not planning to race the bicycle only for pleasure and some duties like food shopping so a good sized saddle bag and handlebar bag . So is the GP 5000 , not a tubular and will it fit my wheels ?
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Old 06-13-24, 10:47 PM
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Originally Posted by roadcrankr
Even cheap tubulars ride better than cheap clinchers. But nowadays, the best clinchers ride nicely.
Still, IMO, expensive sewups like offerings from Veloflex or Vittoria ($80-100ea) ride better than anything else out there.
Their tire life poses the biggest obstacle, because one might get only half the mileage of the best clinchers.
The "Totally Tubular" sub-forum thread covers this topic very well. Check it out.
Are Hutchinson Tempo 2's or something like this, still around?. I like the feel of them. I know tubulars expensive so would a cheaper one be a good idea? Or would they simply not last very long. Should I post in The Wanted section of this forum for anyone that may have a nice older pair in good condition that would fit my wheels of the same type of tire. Or are tubulars simply too impractical for my purposes I want to get the most { best feel } out of this bicycle that I can, it has great components and frame. Is there an alternative I should consider to the GP 5000 that looks very traditional. I definitely want the warmer looking gum wall tires.
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Old 06-13-24, 11:14 PM
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Perhaps just look at the market and see what a vast majority of performance cyclists are using to help you decide. Racing, performance riding and just normal enthusiasts have abandoned tubulars for good reason.

Since you already have a setup and you are curious you can buy a pair of premium tubular’s and give it a try for a while. But most likely you will need a set of clincher wheels if you plan on using your bike frequently.

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Old 06-14-24, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Alexthe
Appreciate the suggestion I will definitely consider it. No I am not planning to race the bicycle only for pleasure and some duties like food shopping so a good sized saddle bag and handlebar bag . So is the GP 5000 , not a tubular and will it fit my wheels ?
I do not understand this post. Tubular tires are glued onto tubular rims. A GP 5000 tire is a clincher tire that is secured to clincher rims. No, a GP 5000 tire or any clincher tire will not work on tubular rims.

Also, once tubular tires are correctly glued onto the rims, getting the tire off the rim may damage the tire. So the idea of buying a used tubular tire does not work very well. I would not sell a tubular tire that I removed from a rim to a third party.

The idea of using a bicycle with tubular tire for shopping where there is more road debris and chances for flats does not sound like a solid idea to me. YMMV.
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Old 06-14-24, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Hermes
I do not understand this post. Tubular tires are glued onto tubular rims. A GP 5000 tire is a clincher tire that is secured to clincher rims. No, a GP 5000 tire or any clincher tire will not work on tubular rims.

Also, once tubular tires are correctly glued onto the rims, getting the tire off the rim may damage the tire. So the idea of buying a used tubular tire does not work very well. I would not sell a tubular tire that I removed from a rim to a third party.

The idea of using a bicycle with tubular tire for shopping where there is more road debris and chances for flats does not sound like a solid idea to me. YMMV.
The wheels on the bicycle which I included in my starter thread Mavic GEL 280, hence the question of the GP 5000s appropriate because they sounded like clinchers to me. And I assumed you caught the mention of the wheels. I do not want to change these wheels they are lovely and original they are fine feeling I will be stuck with whatever tires I can get on them meaning tubulars if that is the case . And have to take my chances. There is an astonishing amount of differences and opinions and experiences dealing with these tub tires. I only weigh around 119 pounds. I will be getting a Carradice english saddle bag most probably, and the biggest one they make to carry the most .
I want to include this: ( look at the last paragraph ) this is from Richard's bicycle book , By Richard Ballantine . I know , . So What,.. it was written in 1972. People dealt with it back then. By the way this man loves racing bikes, he says just get a racing bike, and he's ( if still alive ) a New York , living in the East Village! He used to race against his friends on the New York subway trains, buses and cars, and beat them all, and you know what,.... I think he was riding tubulars!

Also "if anyone has an old pair of something that will fit my wheels ". I didn't mean used, I just meant old,or in good condition or new old stock.
Thanks

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Old 06-14-24, 10:03 PM
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Alexthe, what I recommend is a wider tubular, 28 mm or more. In my experience silk tubulars that are 28 mm wide offer a lovely ride, I'd still love to find some Clément Campionato del Mondo Setas (seta means silk), which I rode for years before they disappeared from the market. To replace them I am now using FMB tubular, also silk and 28 mm. If you don't want to spend that much, look at Veloflex cotton tubulars.
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Old 06-14-24, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
Alexthe, what I recommend is a wider tubular, 28 mm or more. In my experience silk tubulars that are 28 mm wide offer a lovely ride, I'd still love to find some Clément Campionato del Mondo Setas (seta means silk), which I rode for years before they disappeared from the market. To replace them I am now using FMB tubular, also silk and 28 mm. If you don't want to spend that much, look at Veloflex cotton tubulars.
THANK's not going to change these Wheels !
Where do you buy them? Where can I look at them?
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Old 06-14-24, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Alexthe
THANK's not going to change these Wheels !
Where do you buy them? Where can I look at them?
you can get the FMB tires from Rene Herse (https://www.renehersecycles.com). I can't recall where i bought the Veloflex tires; probably ordered them through a local shop.
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Old 06-14-24, 10:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Aubergine
you can get the FMB tires from Rene Herse (https://www.renehersecycles.com). I can't recall where i bought the Veloflex tires; probably ordered them through a local shop.
I love the Rene Herse everything too , but Champagne taste and a beer budget, leads me to "consider" the other's , but not necessarily purchase since I have to go with what I will like. send me a link of the gumwall version of Veloflex tires and I'll see if I can stomach it , if it isn't too much trouble. So how do the Veloflex compare? Is it close enough in your opinion.

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Old 06-15-24, 08:28 AM
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Moved to Road forum.
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Old 06-15-24, 08:41 AM
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We discovered you had a thread on the same subject matter in General. Only one thread open on a subject matter in the forums. Thread closed and refer to the open thread in General.

Why do YOU love tubulars tires and can they work in an urban environment?

Last edited by Homebrew01; 06-19-24 at 06:36 AM.
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