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TheDTrain 08-31-05 12:31 PM

Need to gather up a repair kit for flats
 
I just got into cycling these past few weeks.

I haven't had a single flat yet, but a lot of you guys have. So I want to be prepared a gather up a repair kit in my wedge pack just in case.

I'm a little confused about a few things. Firstly, what exactly is a spare tube? Is it a spare tire? If so, how would it fit in a wedge pack?

I'll need a patch kit, I get the understanding of that. But what should I use to inflate the tire? Should I buy a minipump to attach to my frame or get CO2 cartidges.

How do CO2 cartidges work? Are they better than just air?

If anyone could clear things up for me or direct me to a site that has info, I would be grateful. Thanks.

hi565 08-31-05 12:36 PM


Originally Posted by TheDTrain
I just got into cycling these past few weeks.

I haven't had a single flat yet, but a lot of you guys have. So I want to be prepared a gather up a repair kit in my wedge pack just in case.

I'm a little confused about a few things. Firstly, what exactly is a spare tube? Is it a spare tire? If so, how would it fit in a wedge pack?

I'll need a patch kit, I get the understanding of that. But what should I use to inflate the tire? Should I buy a minipump to attach to my frame or get CO2 cartidges.

How do CO2 cartidges work? Are they better than just air?

If anyone could clear things up for me or direct me to a site that has info, I would be grateful. Thanks.

use the search function young skywalker...

demoncyclist 08-31-05 12:40 PM

The tube fits inside the tire. It holds the air. The tire doesn't seal against the rim like car tires do, so you need the tube. I personally don't like minipumps. They don't generate enough pressure to properly fill high pressure road tires, unless you have arms like Aahnold. Either get a full sized frame pump, or a CO2 inflator. You will also probably need tire levers. My preferences are either the Crank Bros. Speed Lever or if you can find one, a Quik Stik. Then download the instructions from www.parktool.com and practice before you find yourself on the side of the road with a flat.

Keith99 08-31-05 12:51 PM

A tube is a tube. Back when dinosaurs ruled the earth even cars had tubes, now almost all care tures are tubeless, and thus it seems people get confused.

Ok here are my comments and suggestions.

Get a frame pump or mini pump. If you want you can also get a co2 system. But if only one go with the pump. Most co2 systems are one cartridge one refill. Have one of those nightmare rides (or just one nightmare flat) and you are done if you only have a co2 system.

Other things to have. Tire 'irons' they are always plastic these days, and that is better. They are for getting the tires on and off the rims. It can be done without them, but they make life a lot easier. At least one spare tube, I suggest 2. A patch kit ALSO not instead. Why both patch kit and tubes? You can get a hole that can not be patched, too big, near the stem or even stem damage. Why a patch kit, same as why a pump. Have that ride with lots of bad luck you can patch again and again if needed. Why 2 tubes. Well I hate patching on the road. Also first time out it is fairly common to cause valve damage in replacing a tube, if the original tube was not patchable you are then screwed.

Use to search functions to find more. There is a maintenance section here. Should be lots there. My one BIG suggestion is change out a tube at home first. Learn what it takes to get the wheels off and all when it doesn't mean at best a ruined ride if you fail. (It is also a lot easier to do for the first time when you are fresh and relaxed). Worst case if you can not do it at home is a drive to the local shop and a few bucks to get it done. Most shops will be happy to teach you all you need to know on this one, there may be a small charge. (If a shop will not help you learn on this time to find a new shop).

I prefer to save up tubes with holes and patch 3 or 4 at a time. Once you open the glue on a patch kit it starts to dry out. I usually buy a second patch kit and put the unopened glue in with the first, always having an unopened glue tube on a ride. A patchkit with only dried out glue is pretty worthless.

Stubacca 08-31-05 12:58 PM


Originally Posted by Keith99
My one BIG suggestion is change out a tube at home first. Learn what it takes to get the wheels off and all when it doesn't mean at best a ruined ride if you fail. (It is also a lot easier to do for the first time when you are fresh and relaxed).

Great advice.

Practice changing a tube without the pressure of being on the side of the road. I'd even go as far as to say practice fixing a hole at home too - a thumbtack pushed into the tyre does a great job of giving you a hole to work with ;).

I prefer a good pump over CO2... Topeak Road Morph is great, will easily pump a tyre up to the 125psi that I run in the rear.

So, you need:

Under-seat pack
Tyre levers
Spare tube (x2)
Patch kit
Pump

TheDTrain 08-31-05 01:03 PM

Well if the tube is in the tire, won't the tire be punctured before the tubes gets touched? Therefore won't you need both a patch kit and a spare tube?

Also, what exactly IS a CO2 cartiledge? I never knew you could pump up a tire with just CO2?

Is there a site with pictures cuz I'm still confused.

Stubacca 08-31-05 01:10 PM


Originally Posted by TheDTrain
Well if the tube is in the tire, won't the tire be punctured before the tubes gets touched? Therefore won't you need both a patch kit and a spare tube?

Air in the tube, not the tyre. If something punctures the tyre but not the tube, nothing happens - you just keep riding, and will probably never know. If debris makes it though the tyre and punctures the tube, you have a flat.

You patch a tube, not a tyre. A spare tube and a patch kit is suggested. If you get a flat, put in the spare tube - it's typically much faster than patching a hole. If you get a second flat, then resort to the patches.

On very rare occasions you can encounter debris large enough to damage the tyre e.g. slice the sidewall open. It's not something that you carry a spare for - a dollar bill or an energy bar wrapper will typically work as a temporary boot so that you can inflate a tube inside and get yourself home, then replace the tyre. Very rare....


Also, what exactly IS a CO2 cartiledge? I never knew you could pump up a tire with just CO2?
Compressed CO2, like used in paintball guns etc.


Is there a site with pictures cuz I'm still confused.
http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=100

DocRay 08-31-05 03:24 PM


Originally Posted by Stubacca
Under-seat pack
Tyre levers
Spare tube (x2)
Patch kit
Pump

Too much and redundant. I use:

mini seat pack from Pedro's (fits under racing saddle)
plastic tyre levers (2)
self-adhesive patches
2 C02 cartridges and one filler

No point in 2 extra tubes and a patch kit. Patch 'till you get back home, the swap to new tubes. In three years, I've only had one flat.

Stubacca 08-31-05 03:34 PM


Originally Posted by DocRay
Too much and redundant. I use:

mini seat pack from Pedro's (fits under racing saddle)
plastic tyre levers (2)
self-adhesive patches
2 C02 cartridges and one filler

No point in 2 extra tubes and a patch kit. Patch 'till you get back home, the swap to new tubes. In three years, I've only had one flat.

Whatever works for you. I've had 3 flats in one ride.

Avalanche325 08-31-05 03:45 PM


Originally Posted by DocRay
No point in 2 extra tubes and a patch kit. Patch 'till you get back home, the swap to new tubes. In three years, I've only had one flat.

Lucky you. I got three flats in one day on a 50 mile ride.

I agree with 2 tubes and a patch kit. A really cheap, really small pump that you can get up to over 100psi is the Topeak Pocket Rocket. I got one for $8. No patch kit in the world will repair a broken valve.

DocRay 08-31-05 03:48 PM

I've never had more than one flat on a ride in 23 years. I must live a charmed life.

Stubacca 08-31-05 03:58 PM


Originally Posted by DocRay
I've never had more than one flat on a ride in 23 years. I must live a charmed life.

Lucky you. :D

I've only had one flat on the roadie this year (touch wood) and only 2 last year. Can't remember much further back :o. I don't mind the extra few grams of "redundancy" if it means I don't have to walk 30+ miles home or pay for an expensive taxi fare.

Keith99 08-31-05 04:05 PM


Originally Posted by DocRay
I've never had more than one flat on a ride in 23 years. I must live a charmed life.

I do not recall 2 ever having 2 independent flats on one ride in about 15 years myself.

BUT

I've picked up a piece of steel belt 3 different times. Only one of those times did I find it on the first try. One other time I found it the second flat less than 5 miles later, but it took over 5 minures at teh side of the road. One time I rode over 40 more miles after teh first flat and the tire seemed fine, but next morning flat again.

The one time I found it first time was on The Grand Tour, 200 mile ride in one day. About 30 miles from the end I flatted about 15 milutes before sunset but found the small piece of steel belt right away. Ironic part was that I was down to one spare tube because I'd given my number 2 spare to a rider who was on his 3rd flat less than 25 miles into the ride.

Also don't forget one sticker bush or the glass from one accident and you can have both tires flat, perhaps with multiple punctures.

And one should always finish a ride with a spare, you never know when you will meet someone attractive who has a flat.

Avalanche325 08-31-05 04:08 PM


Originally Posted by DocRay
I've never had more than one flat on a ride in 23 years. I must live a charmed life.

What kind of tires / tubes do you use?

On my three flat day, one was my fault for not getting a piece of glass out. I couldn't feel or see it when changing the tube. But when I pushed a small allen wrench through a tiny piece of glass came out.

OK Dtrain, This is a perfect lead-in to ask what kind of multi-tool you should carry.

DocRay 08-31-05 04:29 PM

I would carry one extra tube for a centaury ride, but I also choose my daily ride route based on how clean the roads are and avoid areas with construction sights or too much crud on the lanes.

Municipalities clean the roads up here regularly, I know this was not the case when I lived in the US.

As for the other reason to carry a spare, ...the riders around here are as ugly as I am...

Pobrecito 09-03-05 03:42 PM


Originally Posted by Avalanche325
Lucky you. I got three flats in one day on a 50 mile ride.

I agree with 2 tubes and a patch kit. A really cheap, really small pump that you can get up to over 100psi is the Topeak Pocket Rocket. I got one for $8. No patch kit in the world will repair a broken valve.


Suggested by my LBS, I also ride with 2 tubes & a patch kit. I had my first flat on a road bike a couple of months ago. The front tire flatted on a downhill. Luckily the tire remained on the rim but by the time I had stopped, the sidewall was cut and the tube looked like Swiss cheese. No patch kit would had been able to fix it. Without a spare, I would have been walking home instead of riding (not that I was crazy about riding on a trashed tire).


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